Christophe Fratin

(18001864 ) - Sculptures
FRATIN Christophe Two Eagles Battling A Lynx

Sotheby's /Dec 5, 2008
315,831.03 - 473,746.55
Not Sold

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Artworks in Arcadja
156

Some works of Christophe Fratin

Extracted between 156 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Christophe Fratin - Aimable

Christophe Fratin - Aimable

Original
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Lot number: 26
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Description:
RACING AND ANIMALIER BRONZES FROM A UK COLLECTION Christophe Fratin FRENCH 1790 - 1864 AIMABLE signed: FRATIN, and entitled: AIMABLE bronze, dark brown patina, on a veined green marble base bronze: 28 by 40 by 17cm., 11 by 15¾ by 6¾in. base: 3.5cm., 1 3/8 in. Overall the condition of the bronze is very good with minor dirt and wear to the surface consistent with age with particular dust to the crevices. There are minor spats of paint to the surface. There is some minor greening to the proper left side of the rib cage. The condition of the modern base is very good with a reattached chip to one of the corners.
Christophe Fratin - Two Eagles Battling A Lynx

Christophe Fratin - Two Eagles Battling A Lynx

Original 1850
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Gross Price
Lot number: 104
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Description:
LOT 104 PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE AMERICAN COLLECTION CHRISTOPHE FRATIN FRENCH 1800-1864 TWO EAGLES BATTLING A LYNX signed Fratin, inscribed Vetheuil and the base dated 1850 bronze, dark brown patina height 76 1/4 in.; width 75 in.; height of pedestal 47 3/4 in. 193.5 cm; 190 cm; 121.5 cm
Christophe Fratin - Tigresse Portant Une Proie (tigress With An Antelope)

Christophe Fratin - Tigresse Portant Une Proie (tigress With An Antelope)

Original
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Lot number: 31
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Description:
LOT 31 CHRISTOPHE FRATIN FRENCH, 1790 - 1864 TIGRESSE PORTANT UNE PROIE (TIGRESS WITH AN ANTELOPE) 3,000—5,000 GBP measurements measurements note 25 by 42.5cm., 9¾ by 16¾in. signed: FRATIN bronze, rich brown patina CATALOGUE NOTE RELATED LITERATURE M. Poletti and A. Richarme, Fratin. Objets décoratifs & Sculptures romantiques, Paris, 2000, p. 55, no. 76
Christophe Fratin - Two Eagles Battling A Lynx

Christophe Fratin - Two Eagles Battling A Lynx

Original 1850
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 203
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Description:
Measurements 75 by 74 in. (on a 48 in. green marble base) alternate measurements 190.5 by 188 cm signed: Fratin inscribed Vetheuil and dated 1850 (on thebase) bronze, dark brown patina PROVENANCE Colonel Sir Watkin Williams-Wynn, 6th Baronet, Wynnstay Hall,Wrexham, and by descent With Anthony Roth Fine Arts, Ltd. London CATALOGUE NOTE Christophe Fratin was at the height of both his creativity andhis international success when he sculpted the magnificent TwoEagles Battling a Lynx in 1850. Although conservative jurieshad regularly excluded Fratin's work from the Paris Salonthroughout the turbulent 1840s, powerful support from the press andimportant commissions from prominent patrons in Paris and Londonand as far away as Saint Petersburg enabled the artist to continuewith the beautifully crafted scenes of animals in combat that madeFratin's reputation. Just a year after Two Eagles Battling aLynx was completed, Fratin was awarded a medal at the CrystalPalace Exhibition in London in 1851 (the first truly comprehensiveworld's fair) for another life size group of eagles. Thecommendation from the Fine Arts jury accompanying the medaldescribed Fratin as "the most celebrated sculptor of animals inFrance at the present day." Two Eagles Battling a Lynx presents a pair of majesticbirds protecting their nest from a marauding wild cat -- the singlefeather in the predator's mouth suggests the lynx has alreadyattacked one of their young. Fratin's imaginative composition,which balances the outswept wings of the eagle descending upon thelynx with the upraised wings of its mate, speaks to both the energyand the elegance that the artist's admirers found in even his mostviolent scenes of natural combat. His attention to unusual animaldetails such as the lynx's distinctive whiskers and deeply cuppedears was an important aspect of Fratin's success, as was hisemphasis on complex textural contrasts of feathers, horny beaks,and rocky aeries. But it was in the development of the lower eaglewho has twisted underneath the lynx to protect the nest with itsown body that Fratin's particular genius emerges, giving his animalgroup a heroism and an emotional impact that could challenge any ofthe figural sculptures of the mid-nineteenth-century. Fratin was the son of a shoe-maker and sometime taxidermist inMetz on the eastern edge of France and he came onto the Paris sceneat the landmark Salon of 1831, the exhibition that launched theRomantic movement with groundbreaking compositions by Delacroix andDelaroche as well as major works by the landscape artists who wouldform the heart of the century's Realist movement. Together with theslightly older sculptor Antoine Barye (who showed his first animalmodels at the same Salon), Fratin quickly established the importantplace of animalier sculpture at the heart of thenaturalistic revolution that so effectively undermined theconservative French art establishment. Initially, Fratin's role wasas a junior artist to Barye, supplying secondary animal figures forthe elaborate surtout du table commissioned by the Ducd'Orléans during the mid-1830s to feature several of Barye'shunting scenes. But with Fratin's 1839 Salon bronze of An Eagleand Vulture Disputing their Prey , he established himself as aformidable rival to Barye and as an indisputable master of thesubject matter of animals in combat. Throughout the next decade,Fratin's monumental animal groups and single figures of eleganthorses or powerful dogs were sought after by more liberal membersof the French aristocracy as well as by collectors all over Europe.Finally, with the establishment of a more liberal government inFrance under the Second Empire in 1851, Fratin began to receiveofficial state commissions for his larger groups. Two Eagles Battling a Lynx is apparently a singular cast;no other example of this composition is known. But Two EaglesBattling a Lynx belongs firmly to Fratin's interests of the1850s, when pairs of eagles were among the artist's most soughtafter compositions. An 1847 newspaper article documents acommission from the Tsar for two groups of eagles (now lost) whileTwo Eagles Fighting over a Goat , also dated 1850 and perhapsthe piece honored at the Crystal Palace Exhibition, was acquired byan American industrialist who donated the group to New York'sCentral Park in 1863 (where it stands near 69th street). TheCentral Park group (fig. ) and a related composition of EaglesFighting over a Deer (Metz, Botanical Garden) increase thedynamism of the overall work by spreading the birds outhorizontally, they lack the striking monumentality that Fratinachieved in Two Eagles Battling a Lynx by interlocking hispair of powerful two eagles in a single moment of attack. Over his lifetime, Fratin's sculptural oeuvre rangedwidely. He established a large repertoire of smaller scalecompositions that were issued in multiple editions (the CentralPark eagle group was slightly rearranged for a smaller cast) andtoday Fratin is best known for small elegant groups of horses,battling lions, and humorous scenes of bears imitating humanfoibles (see lot ). In addition to free-standing table sculpture,Fratin also developed a beautiful line of small bas reliefs ofsingle animals, and even a range of animal heads, suitable fortopping walking sticks! During his lifetime, Fratin's rivalry withBarye was the stuff of the popular press and Fratin himself wasrecorded by celebrated caricaturists. That today Barye is so muchbetter known is in part due to the superb collections of Barye'ssmaller bronzes preserved in French and American museums measuredagainst the corresponding loss of so many of Fratin's large piecesmelted down during the wars of the twentieth century: of elevenlarge compositions commissioned by the King of Prussia, only fourcan be traced today; and Fratin's Cheval attaqué par un lion erected in the Place Montrouge in Paris in 1853 disappeared duringthe 1940s occupation. Two Eagles Battling a Lynx was acquired by Sir WatkinWilliams-Wynn, the sixth Baronet of Wynnstay and the lord of animmense family estate spanning sections of Denbigh in Wales, andShropshire and Cheshire in western England. Sir WatkinWilliams-Wynn inherited his title and the family seat, WynnstayHall in Wrexham in 1840 and he devoted considerable effort over hislong life to improving the grounds and to renewing his family'spatronage of the Ruabon Hunt and foxhounds. The Wynnstay Hallgrounds include a landmark garden created in the 18th century byCapability Brown, and during the 1850s and 1860s Sir WatkinWilliams-Wynn acquired several large pieces of contemporarysculpture to decorate both the house and further gardens. Fratin'sTwo Eagles Battling a Lynx remained at Wynnstay untilsometime after the death of the 7th Baronet in 1944, when theestate was broken up and much of its furnishings and art soldoff. This catalogue entry was written by Alexandra Murphy.
Christophe Fratin - Model Of A Horse And Foal

Christophe Fratin - Model Of A Horse And Foal

Original
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Lot number: 91
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Description:
Raised on a naturalistically cast rectangularbase, stamped FRATIN, 41 wide, 37cm high (16" wide, 14.5" high) Footnote: Born in Metz Fratin was the son of a taxidermist. His understandingof the anatomy of animals probably came from his time helping hisfather in his taxidermy business. Fratin studied under Pioche inMetz and then moved to Paris where he studied under the painter andsculptor Gericault. Fratin exhibited widely at the Paris Salon andat the Great Exhibition in London.
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