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Helen Frankenthaler

(1928 -  2011 ) Wikipedia® : Helen Frankenthaler
FRANKENTHALER Helen Guadalupe

Christie's /Nov 1, 2016
10,983.98 - 16,475.97
19,273.75

Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of Helen Frankenthaler at auctions worldwide.
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Artworks in Arcadja
924

Some works of Helen Frankenthaler

Extracted between 924 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Helen Frankenthaler - Frankenthaler

Helen Frankenthaler - Frankenthaler

Original 1974
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Lot number: 122
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PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT AMERICAN CORPORATE COLLECTION Helen Frankenthaler 1928 - 2011 signed acrylic on canvas 41 by 175 1/2 in. 104.1 by 445.8 cm. Executed in 1974. Provenance André Emmerich Gallery Inc., New York Mr. and Mrs. Robert Peter Miller, New York Acquired from the above by 1989 Exhibited Zurich, Galerie André Emmerich, Helen Frankenthaler, Neue Bilder, June - August 1974 Washington, D.C., Corcoran Gallery of Art; Seattle Art Museum; Houston, Museum of Fine Arts, Helen Frankenthaler: Paintings 1969-1974, April - November 1975, cat. no. 33, n.p., illustrated Literature John Elderfield, Frankenthaler, New York 1989, pp. 252-253, illustrated in color Catalogue Note "Frankenthaler is a daring painter. She is willing to risk the big gesture, to employ huge formats so that her essentially intimate revelations may be more fully explored and delineated...She is willing to declare erotic and sentimental preoccupations full-scale and with conviction. She has the ability to let a painting be beautiful, or graceful, or sullen and perfunctory, if these qualities are part of the force and clarity of the occasion." Frank O'Hara in John Elderfield, Frankenthaler, New York 1989, p. 184 Under April Mood by Helen Frankenthaler beautifully captures the emotional power and painterly exuberance that has garnered the artist critical acclaim. Of an impressive scale, the present work is an arresting example of Frankenthaler’’’’’’’’s 1970s Color Field canvases. Its expansive, saturated hues at once confront the viewer with a feeling of spontaneity and measured control. Painted in 1974, Under April Mood comes after a series of momentous changes in Frankenthaler’’’’’’’’s life. In 1970, she closed her 83rd street studio after a decade of working there, and in 1971 divorced from Abstract Expressionist painter, Robert Motherwell, after thirteen years of marriage. Despite these emotionally trying events, she was also riding a wave of professional successes. In 1969, she was celebrated in an impressive retrospective at the Whitney Museum in New York. Then, in 1972, she was the subject of a major monograph by Barbara Rose. Channeling the tumultuous emotions of this period into her work, Frankenthaler’’’’’’’’s canvases of the early and mid-1970s have a particularly bold and expressive nature. Rose praised the artist, saying: "In her life as in her art, Frankenthaler has said that she is interested primarily in growth and development…. Her paintings are not merely beautiful. They are statements of great intensity and significance about what it is to stay alive, to face crisis and survive, to accept maturity with grace and even joy" (Barbara Rose, Frankenthaler, New York 1972, p. 105-106). The horizontality and division of bold saturated hues in Under April Mood evoke a luscious springtime landscape, without resorting to figuration. The verdant green and cerulean blue along the bottom are complemented by the earthly tones of ruby and peach that dominate the central composition and conjure a spring sunrise, altogether resulting in a poetic and dynamic exploration of how color and form can expose the unlimited space between imagination and memory. Despite whatever associations and emotions Under April Mood might kindle, the abstract nature of the painting leaves it open to ambiguity and infinite potential meaning. Frankenthaler’’’’’’’’s signature form of abstraction, first employed in 1952 in her ground-breaking Mountains and Sea, was achieved by diluting her paint, allowing it to completely soak into the fibers of the raw unprimed canvas. The thinned-paint literally fused with its fibrous support, drawing focus to the canvas as an integral part of the art itself, and representing an abrupt departure from the materiality of paint central in the work of the Abstract Expressionists, in particular, Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, and Richard Pousette-Dart. The effect she is able to achieve is color that is rich yet luminous, and forms that are voluminous without being heavy. Her innovation changed the course of art history and influenced generations of artists, beginning with Kenneth Noland, Morris Louis and Jules Olitski. Powerful, poetic and enacted on a grand scale, Under April Mood is Frankenthaler’’’’’’’’s resounding answer to the transcendent canvases that Rothko, Newman and Pollock introduced into the corpus of 20th century abstract painting in the late 1940s, and which came to define the American abstract vernacular. Moving beyond her predecessors achievements, Frankenthaler carved a niche within this canon, deeply singular and personal to her experience yet inclusive of our own. E. A. Carmean Jr. eloquently expressed this sense in the introduction to the catalogue for Frankenthaler’’’’’’’’s retrospective in 1989, writing, “One has the feeling that her pictures are an environment into which we look, and, in a similar way, that it is an environment, a place, where she has been” (E. A. Carmean in Exh. Cat., New York, Museum of Modern Art (and travelling), Helen Frankenthaler: A Paintings Retrospective, 1989, p. 8). Fig. 1 Helen Frankenthaler in her New York studio, 1975 Photo: © Alexander Liberman, Courtesy of The Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles (accession number 2000.R.19) © J. Paul Getty Trust Artwork © 2016 Helen Frankenthaler / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Helen Frankenthaler - Zarathustra

Helen Frankenthaler - Zarathustra

Original 1988
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Lot number: 110
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Helen Frankenthaler (1928-2011) Zarathustra signed 'Frankenthaler' (lower right); signed again and dated twice '1988 Frankenthaler '88' (on the reverse) acrylic on canvas 81 x 98 ¼ in. (205.7 x 249.6 cm.) Painted in 1988. A large-scale, magisterial work, Helen Frankenthaler’’’’’’’’s Zarathustra typifies the beauty, elegance and lyricism that are the signature qualities of this artist who founded the highly influential mid-twentieth century Color Field School of painting. The evocative title conjures up a mysterious figure, yet one which remains resolutely elusive. On the topic of assigning titles to her paintings, Frankenthaler remarked “I usually name them for an image that comes out of the pictures” (E.A. Carmean, Helen Frankenthaler: A Paintings Retrospective, exh. cat., Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, 1989 p. 38). Possibly the title here makes reference to a composition by Richard Strauss, as other works by the artist have made reference to the worlds of classical music, such as a 1987 painting named after the eighteenth century Italian composer Domenico Scarlatti. Delicate, glowing violet and green tonalities freely wash across the canvas surface, flowing, emerging and receding, the liquid nature of the paint at the moment when it was first applied still quite apparent in the finished work. The colors are wonderfully various, ranging from deep, fully saturated hues to colors that are almost transparent, giving off a glow close to luminous whiteness. Deeper blue, black, and brown tones set off the more ethereal hues. Color is the very heart of this work. Frankenthaler gave color a new independence, allowing it to float free, not tethered by representation or gesture. The artist once remarked, ''There is no 'always.’’’’’’’’ No formula. There are no rules. Let the picture lead you where it must go.'' (H. Frankenthaler, quoted in “Helen Frankenthaler, Back to the Future,” New York Times, April 27, 2003). Zarathustra, although it was accomplished in the medium of acrylic paint, expresses the aqueous qualities so characteristic of watercolor, an effect Frankenthaler deliberately sought. As with watercolor, the tonalities are darker here, lighter there, of varying opacity determined by the thickness of the paint. “She gained what watercolorists had always had—freedom to make her gesture live on the canvas with stunning directness” (E. Munro, Originals: American Women Artists, New York, 2000, p. 218). Translucence, luminosity, opacity, staining: qualities typically associated with watercolor, are all on brilliant display here. Setting these off, harder-edged shapes—rectangular blocks of color, seemingly applied with a brush rather than poured or washed across the surface—define the canvas’’’’’’’’ top and bottom margins, as well as its right boundary and left bottom corner. These more sharply defined forms seem to contain the flow of paint to the center of the work, where thin washes of color merge into one another. A restless innovator, “[o]ver more than half a century, Frankenthaler remained a fearless explorer in the studio, investigating a remarkable range of media. She adopted acrylic paint, on canvas and paper, early on, reveling in its intensity even when thinned” (K. Wilkin, "Helen Frankenthaler (1928–2011),” American Art, Vol. 26, No. 3, 2012, p. 103). Zarathustra balances volume and void, weight and weightlessness. Darker at its peripheries, the painting lightens toward its center. The colors merging yet brightening, the center of the painting expresses a luminous, open feeling, drawing the eye toward it. One can trace the horizontal and vertical movements of the paint, lending the work a wonderful feeling of combined stillness and movement. Frankenthaler’’’’’’’’s work projects a relaxed, spontaneous feeling even as it encompasses complex possibilities, from joyful to reflective. Art historian Barbara Rose observed that Frankenthaler had a gift for “the freedom, spontaneity, openness and complexity of an image, not exclusively of the studio or the mind, but explicitly and intimately tied to nature and human emotions” (B. Rose, quoted in “Helen Frankenthaler, Back to the Future,” The New York Times, April 27, 2003). Emerging out of Abstract Expressionism, Frankenthaler became one of the most significant painters of the second half of the twentieth-century, defining a new style characterized by a de-emphasis on brushstroke and gesture in favor of areas of unbroken surface made up of large flat areas of solid color. The goal was to make color itself the subject. Frankenthaler’’’’’’’’s poured paint technique produced ethereal washes of color, her paint not resting on top of the canvas but rather soaking into the very weave of the material, mingling with and becoming a part of it. Departing from the bold and fierce, slashing brushstrokes of Abstract Expressionism, Frankenthaler chose to emphasize the flat surface of the canvas itself (so evident in the solid washes of color that make up the present work) over the effort to use the surface to construct an illusion of depth, In doing so, she compelled the viewer to savor the very nature of paint on canvas. Her work became an essential bridge between Abstract Expressionism and Minimalism, offering a new way to define and use color to those artists who were to define the Minimalist movement of the sixties. Frankenthaler’’’’’’’’s work asks that the viewer focus their attention toward the very nature of paint on canvas. The surface of the canvas—and the play of colors across it—are Frankenthaler’’’’’’’’s true subject. “The feeling-tone her paintings have projected has been the serene and beautiful, achieved by the insightful control over the elements of form: floating areas of color; occasional fountains, spurts, jets of color thrown against bare canvas; hard-edge panels or curtains of bright flat non-naturalistic color” (E. Munro, Originals: American Women Artists, New York, 2000, p. 208).
Helen Frankenthaler - In The Wings

Helen Frankenthaler - In The Wings

Original 1987
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Lot number: 19
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Sale 2431 Lot 19 HELEN FRANKENTHALER In the Wings. Color sugar-lift etching, soft-ground etching, aquatint, etching and lithograph on light blue HMP hand made paper, 1987. 343x540 mm; 13 1/2x21 1/4 inches, full margins. Artist's proof, aside from the edition of 50. Signed, dated and inscribed "AP 8/12" in pencil, lower left. Printed and published by Tyler Graphics Ltd., Mount Kisco. A superb impression with strong colors. Harrison 135
Helen Frankenthaler - Guadalupe

Helen Frankenthaler - Guadalupe

Original 1989
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Lot number: 291
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HELEN FRANKENTHALER (1928-2011) Guadalupe Mixografía® in colors, on handmade paper, 1989, signed and dated in pencil, numbered 42/74 (there were also 16 artist’’’’’’’’s proofs), published by Mixografía, Los Angeles, the full sheet, apparently adhered in places to a canvas support, not examined out of the frame Sheet: 69 x 45 in. (1753 x 1143 mm.)
Helen Frankenthaler - Solar Imp

Helen Frankenthaler - Solar Imp

Original 2001
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Lot number: 12
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Description:
Helen Frankenthaler, “Solar Imp,” Screenprint, 2001 Screenprint in colors on wove paper USA, 2001 Helen Frankenthaler (b.1928 - d.2011) - American Abstract Expressionist painter From an edition of 126 with 18 AP Signed by the artist in pencil on lower left and lower right, recto. Numbered “122/126” in pencil on lower left, recto. Printed by Brand X Editions, New York Co-published by the Lincoln Center, and List Poster and Print Program, New York. Sheet dimensions: 39 ¼ x 30 in (99.7 x 76.2 cm) Framed dimensions: 44 ½ x 35 ½ x ¾ in (113.03 x 90.17 x 1.91 cm) Excellent condition. Helen Frankenthaler (American, b.1928 - d.2011)Originally studying under Rufino Tamayo, second-generation Abstract Expressionist Helen Frankenthaler became active in the New York School of the 1950s. Influenced by Arshile Gorky, Willem de Kooning and Jackson Pollock, Frankenthaler gained fame with her ‘soak-stain’’’’’’’’ technique – applying thin washes of paint onto raw, unprimed canvas. Her iconic "Mountains and Sea" (1952) was an important work for Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland and other Color Field painters of the 1960s. Her works often evoked elements of landscape or figuration in the shaping of their forms, almost always improvised from start to finish. In addition to paintings, Frankenthaler was also attracted to printmaking – woodcuts, especially – with hers counting among the greatest contemporary works of that medium. Her work is represented in the permanent collections of many institutions worldwide, including the Art Institute of Chicago; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Centre Pompidou, Paris; The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Condition ReportIn overall excellent condition. Unexamined outside of frame.
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