Carlos Francisco

(19131968 ) - Artworks
FRANCISCO Carlos Untitled

Leon Gallery /Sep 13, 2014
5,128.55 - 6,667.12
43,940.16

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Artworks in Arcadja
13

Some works of Carlos Francisco

Extracted between 13 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Carlos Francisco - Muslim Betrothal

Carlos Francisco - Muslim Betrothal

Original 1958
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Lot number: 1026
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Carlos Villaluz Francisco 1912-1969 MUSLIM BETROTHAL Signed and dated '58 Oil on canvas 109.5 by 176 cm,; 43 by 69 1/4 in. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Acquired directly from the Artist Private Canadian Collection Literature Virginia Ty-Navarro, Paul B. Zafaralla, Sonia P. Ner, Crispina M. Reyes, Carlos V Francisco, The Man and Genius of Philippine Art, Ayala Museum, University of Michigan, 1985, pp. 45 - 46 Patrick D Flores, The Life and Art of Botong Francisco, Vibal Foundation, Inc., 2010, p. 18, colorplate Catalogue Note Carlos Villaluz Francisco, ubiquitously known as Botong, is considered the national artist of the Philippines, responsible for revolutionizing the landscape of art in the nation. As an artist who delved deeply into the literature and minutiae of Filipino history, he is renowned for having transformed its scholarly narratives into glorious visual chronicles. Botong was born in 1912 to a modest household in Angono, Rizal, which is now hailed as the art capital of the country. Having discovered his flair for drawing at a young age, he trained at the University of Philippines School of Fine Arts. Sotheby’’s is privileged to present an iconic painting by this artist, one that reveals his quintessential adulation for native customs and cultural traditions, an appeal that incessantly stimulated him to create fresh imagery. The expansive oil painting, Muslim Betrothal, illustrates an engagement ceremony practiced by the Tausug tribe in the Philippines. The painting comprises a young couple accepting blessings from an imam as they kneel upon a platform of bamboo. Humble scaffoldings shelter the seated wedding guests and vigorous nude dancers who gather to celebrate the momentous occasion. Receding in the distance are blue mountains, which provide an element of relief to otherwise heaving composition. The convoluted structure of the work is akin to that of The Great City of Tenochtitlan, a rigorously assembled mural by Diego Rivera. Rivera juxtaposes tight-knit figures in the foreground with a sprawling, horizontal landscape behind, playing with tensions and releases when arranging his picture plane. There is a flatness and stiffness to both works because entities and figures in the distance, only slightly smaller compared to those in the foreground, are amassed on top of the composition. It is no surprise that Botong idolized this Mexican counterpart, following in his footsteps and indeed revitalizing the art of mural painting in his own nation, a technique to which he remained loyal for three decades. Much like Diego Rivera’’s encyclopedic rendition of the happenings at an Aztec marketplace, Botong’’s Muslim Betrothal serves to educate the viewer. As the work leads the eye horizontally across the canvas, it brings to notice a plethora of diminutive details that provide insights into the rituals prevalent within this betrothal observance; a man on the left side clutches a conch, a pig reposes in slumber and gongs ornament the scene towards the right. It is patent that Botong is a well-informed artist, who depicts truthful, microcosmic moments that together make up the holistic life story of his nation. Unlike the more senior painter Fernando Amorsolo, who rendered romanticized, pastoral scenes of the Filipino countryside, Botong preferred to elucidate the realities of his homeland with all its candid intricacies. Together with his contemporaries Galo Ocampo and Victorio Edades, Botong was considered as part of the Tirumvirate. Exposing more authentic accounts of Filipino identity, these three primary modernists marked a concerted departure from portrayals of idyllic, rustic images that prevailed during the American era. Though he chooses to depict a scene quite similar to that in the Renaissance painting The Marriage of Cupid and Psyche, Botong’’s work is palpably more sociologically driven. While Andrea Schiavone exemplifies a sublime and mythological union of the gods, Botong records study and research into the earthly marital rite of a minority population in the Philippines. Whereas Schiavone follows the foundations of Western linear perspective and employs a station point, Botong focuses on compartmentalizing his composition into taut and delineated groupings. There are multiple lined domes that border the couple: the curvature of their two bowed bodies, their cascading yet controlled draperies, and the overarching imam whose body language envelopes them. Similarly, the embracing couple in Gustav Klimt’’s The Kiss is also ensconced within a protective halo. Though both Klimt and Botong infuse a sense of rigidity by compressing their groupings and stacking various objects one above the other, they retain an element of lyricism in the details within these confinements and in their lurid color palette. The result creates the effect of a tapestry and recalls strict but fluid outlines found within the Art Nouveau movement. In the same vein Botong’’s figures lack the naturalism so prevalent in its Italian comparison. Cupid and Psyche both stand in the contrapposto position, each bending one knee slightly to create an asymmetrical balance and a relaxed yet dynamic rendition of natural movement. Concomitantly, the dancers in the backdrop of Muslim Betrothal move in a more dramatic manner and are captured in a histrionic tribhanga pose. Also embodied by the enticing maidens in the Gupta-period mural from the Ajanta caves in India, the tribhanga, or triple-bend, posture fashions an S-shaped curve to the body instigated by a flexion in the neck, waist and knee. Considered a sensual position originating from Indian classical dance, it is a more spirited and robust manner of illustrating movement, but one with less verisimilitude than that contrapposto stance. The sheer dynamism exuded from Botong’’s uninhibited, dancing nudes exemplifies the joy and vivacity of the festive occasion. It is apparent that this striking picture uncovers a discerning knowledge of history and exploration of myriad stylistic art forms. Botong would stare into his blank wall or canvas for long periods of time, armed with a profound comprehension of his subject matter, until he achieved a moment of epiphany. Thence, he would paint rapidly and fervently, with determined and confident strokes sans any hint of hesitation. These impeccable paintings provide a glimpse into the innovative mind of an artist who altered the art of a nation. Spanning subjects ranging from culture, art, education, economics and history to science, his works now stand as cultural icons in Filipino history. Since his masterworks are primarily immortalized on the walls of private homes, modern buildings and in the headquarters of large institutions, they rarely appear in the public market. Muslim Betrothal represents a stellar work painted by this pensive and mysterious man who dedicated his life to describing the true life experience of the Filipino people. Fig. 1 DIEGO RIVERA, The Great City of Tenochtitlan , 1945 © 2015 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D. F., / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Fig. 2 ANDREA SCHIAVONE (ANDREA MEDULIC OR MELDOLLA), Marriage of Cupid and Psyche , ca. 1550, Italian, Venetian, Oil on wood, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Fig. 3 A scene from the Mahajanaka Jataka, 6th – 7th century CE, Ajanta Caves, India Fig. 4 FERNANDO CUETO AMORSOLO, An Afternoon Bath , 1948, Sold at Sotheby’’’’s Hong Kong, October 7, 2012, lot 295 for USD 172,851 Fig. 5 GUSTAV KLIMT, The Kiss (Lovers) , 1908 – 1909 Österreichische Galerie Belvedere, Vienna See More See Less
Carlos Francisco - Magpupukot

Carlos Francisco - Magpupukot

Original 1957
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Lot number: 36
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CARLOS V. FRANCISCO (The Philippines 1913-1969) Magpupukot (Pulling in the net) signed and dated 'CARLOS V. FRANCISCO 57' (lower right) oil on canvas 36 x 54 4/5 in. (91.5 x 139.5 cm.) Received fine arts training in the School of Fine Arts,University of Philippines. Pioneered group of Modern artists calledThirteen Moderns in 1938. After the second world war, Franciscolectured at the University of Santo Tomas, whilst concurrentlytaking on scriptwriting and costume designing jobs. Became one ofthe Modern Triumvirate with artists Victorio Edades and GaloOcampo, stimulating the Modernist movement in the Philippines. Wonthe grand prize in the inaugural National Art Exhibition of the ArtAssociation of the Philippines in 1948. First significant mural onthe historic beginnings of the country starting from the firstFilipinos was completed in 1953 for the International Fair, Manila.Most famous masterpiece was probably the commissioned mural on theFilipino struggle for freedom located at the Bulwagang Katipunan ofthe Manila City Hall. Received the Republic Cultural Heritage Awardin 1964. Declared Philippines National Artist posthumously in1973. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist. Private collection, Manila. Literature Virginia Ty-Navarro and Paul C. Zafaralla, Carlos V. Francisco:the man and genius of Philippines art, Ayala Museum, Makati,Philippines, 1985. Exhibited Botong: Alay at Alaala, Cultural Centre of the Philippines,Philippines 17 November 1989 - 25 January 1990. Lot Notes Carlos V. Francisco, better known as Botong, was responsible forrevolutionising the fine arts landscape of the Philippines. Hedeparted from the prevailing style of the Amorsolo academic andlaunched the modernist movement with his fellow founders of theModern Triumvirate, Victorio Edades and Galo Ocampo. Their realistdepictions were divergent to the idealised romantic norms then.Magpupukot (Pulling in the net) is an excellent example of hisrealist renderings. Painting the lives of the fishing community was one of Botong'sfavourite subjects. Angono, his hometown where he was based, was afishing village. There were enough sources of inspiration readilyavailable to him. He was especially affected by communal life andtheir resident values and customs. The scene in Magpupukot (Pullingin the net) is a hearty depiction of fishermen reeling in the netsto avail the catch of the day. Botong filled the entire canvasmaking the spatial composition crowded and busy with details,stretching the visual to each end of the canvas. The clear fluidlines lead the eyes to every expression, taut muscle and sinewyfibre of the fishermen. The artist's empathy for the fishermen andpassion to accurately represent can be seen and felt by strokesswept by the paintbrush and the coloured energy of the scene. Thesolid execution of the bold and brilliant colours echos theendurance, vigour and infectious dynamism of the work. One canalmost feel the weight of the net. With a keen appreciation of folkvalues, the artist created great synergy between the vivid coloursand kinetic rhythms of the fishermen, almost literally moving thework to life, symbolising the intoxicating energy of the pioneerswho contributed to the wealth of the current nation. Botong is renowned for his large scale mural paintings which weredrawn from the very same source as the ones for Magpupukot (Pullingin the net) - the people. The customs and traditions held close tothe hearts of the Filipino people have become a vehicle for him andmade accessible his style to create a refreshing new imagery. Thisaffinity with historicity interested him to research on theFilipino legacy and also became apt material for him to draw from.Because his inspirations lie with the people, his works werevaluable in their nationalistic inclinations. Botong's magnificentmurals have become an icon of Filipino art history. His visualenactments celebrate the artistic roots of his culture, his imagesimpressed by the ardent dedication and colour of the Filipinopeople. This work was shown in a retrospective exhibition for the artist,Botong: Alay at Alaala, at the Cultural Center of the Philippinesin 17 November 1989 - 25 January 1990.
Carlos Francisco - Bayanihan

Carlos Francisco - Bayanihan

Original
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Gross Price
Lot number: 68
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Carlos �Botong� Francisco (1912-1969) Bayanihan charcoal on paper 13 1/2� x 19 1/2� (34 cm x 50 cm) This piece is accompanied by a certificate issued by Rod Paras - Perez confirming the authenticity of this lot
Carlos Francisco - Untitled

Carlos Francisco - Untitled

Original 1965
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Gross Price
Lot number: 84
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Carlos �Botong� Francisco (1912-1969) Untitled ca.1965 molave H:33 1/2� x L:18 1/2� x W:23 (85 cm x 47 cm x 58 cm) Aquired directly from the artist by the present owner
Carlos Francisco - First Mass At Limasawa (study)

Carlos Francisco - First Mass At Limasawa (study)

Original 1965
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Net Price
Lot number: 42
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Carlos "Botong" Francisco First Mass at Limasawa (study) signed and dated (lower left) 1965 watercolor 13" x 25" 33 cm x 63.5 cm PROPERTY FROM THE ESTEFANIA ALDABA-LIM COLLECTION
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