Cookies help Arcadja providing its services: browsing the portal you accept their use.
I cookies aiutano Arcadja a fornire i suoi servizi: navigando nel portale ne accettate l'utilizzo.
Cookies disclosure/Informativa cookies

  • Art Auctions, Ventes aux Encheres Art, Kunstauctionen, Subastas Arte, Leilões de Arte, Аукционы искусства, Aste
  • Research
  • Services
  • Enrollment
    • Enrollment
  • Arcadja
  • Search author
  • Login

Ian Fairweather

(1891 -  1974 ) Wikipedia® : Ian Fairweather
FAIRWEATHER Ian Self-portrait

Deutscher and Hackett
Aug 29, 2018
Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of Ian Fairweather at auctions worldwide.
Go to the complete price list of works Follow the artist with our email alert
Along with Ian Fairweather, our clients also searched for the following authors:
Donald Friend, Lloyd Frederic Rees, Arthur James Murch, Hans Heysen, Albert Henry Fullwood, John Peter Russell, Brett Whiteley
Artworks in Arcadja
89

Some works of Ian Fairweather

Extracted between 89 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Ian Fairweather - Fascismo

Ian Fairweather - Fascismo

Original 1963
Estimate:

Price:

Net Price
Lot number: 44
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Ian Fairweather Fascismo 1963 synthetic polymer paint and gouache on cardboard on hardboard 106.0 x 70.5 cm G. Elsworthy, Sydney Private collection, Sydney Christie's, Sydney, 23 September 1985, lot 595 Private collection, Brisbane Private collection, Sydney Menzies, Melbourne, 20 June 2012, lot 36 Company collection, Melbourne Menzies, Melbourne, 24 September 2015, lot 44 Company collection, Victoria
Ian Fairweather - Self-portrait

Ian Fairweather - Self-portrait

Original 1950
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 8
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Description: IAN FAIRWEATHER, (1891 – 1974), SELF-PORTRAIT, c.1950, gouache on paper on board SIGNED: inscribed with title lower right: \‘Self Portrait\’ label attached verso: National Gallery of Australia, Canberra DIMENSIONS: 53.0 x 83.5 cm PROVENANCE: Macquarie Galleries, Sydney Alan and Nola Geddes, Sydney Estate of Nola Geddes, Sydney EXHIBITED: Easter Exhibition, Macquarie Galleries, Sydney, 2 – 14 April 1969, cat. 10 LITERATURE: Bail, M., Ian Fairweather, Bay Books, Sydney and London, 1981, cat. 91, fig. 48, pp. 107 (illus.), 238 Eagle, M., \‘The Painter and the Raft\’ in Bail, M., et. al., Fairweather, Art & Australia Books in association with Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 1994, pp. 27 (illus.), 29 Bail, M., Fairweather, Murdoch Books, Sydney and London, 2009, p. 94 ESSAY: Ian Fairweather has been described as \‘the least parochial of Australian painters, an artist of exceptional force and originality\’1 and he is undeniably one of the most singular artists to have worked in Australia during the twentieth century. Although he is claimed as an Australian and spent many years of his life here – famously living in a shack on Bribie Island, where he produced some of his most highly regarded work between 1953 and his death in 1974 – Fairweather was born in Scotland and undertook his formal art education at London\’s Slade School of Fine Art. With a restless spirit, he travelled extensively – from London, to Canada, China, Bali, Australia, the Philippines, India and beyond – \‘always the outsider, the nostalgic nomad with a dreamlike memory of distant places and experience\’.2 Following the purchase of Seated Figure, 1948 by the Art Gallery of New South Wales and his first solo exhibition at the Macquarie Galleries, Sydney, both in 1949, Fairweather visited Townsville in far north Queensland for several months before hitch-hiking to Darwin, arriving there in mid-April 1950. Domestic comforts were never a priority and after initially taking up residence in a concrete mixer and an abandoned railway truck, he later moved into the Karu, a boat wreck on Dinah Beach at Frances Bay. Known among the locals as \‘Rear Admiral\’, Fairweather lived there for the next two years and, although there was room for his paintings to be hung as he worked, water would pour down the walls when it rained forcing him to remove them \‘and sit on them like a hen\’.3 Painted in Darwin, Self-Portrait, c.1950 is one of a small group of related works which \‘read like direct expressions of the artist\’s subconscious\’4 at the time. Fairweather suffered from feelings of self-pity during these years as well as paranoia about his paintings which were often damaged upon arrival at his Sydney gallery – the result of his working environment and haphazard approach to the use of materials and technique rather than anything suspicious. The now infamous culmination of his precarious emotional and psychological state in Darwin was the ill-fated raft journey on which he aimed to sail to Timor, but instead, saw him washed up hallucinating and exhausted on the beach at Roti, an island between the Savu and Timor Seas. Painted on a large sheet of paper, this work employs Fairweather\’s fluid and calligraphic line to describe a group of standing figures gathered around another who is seated and playing a piano. This subject appears again in the later work, Palm Sunday, 1951 (Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane) but in its immediate, edgy treatment, the spaces between the figures filled in with expressively applied fields of black and white gouache, Self-Portrait has more in common with the plainly titled Hell, 1950 (Ian Potter Museum of Art, University of Melbourne), the claustrophobia of which clearly spells out the emotional temperament of its maker. Rather than depicting himself, Fairweather has produced what Murray Bail interprets as an inverse self-portrait in this work,5 the convivial crowd gathered together in the joyous collective act of making music the opposite of his isolated and increasingly desolate state. 1. Bail, M., Ian Fairweather, Bay Books, Sydney, 1981, p. 220 2. Bail, M., \‘The Nostalgic Nomad\’, Hemisphere, Canberra, vol. 27, no. 1, 1982, p. 54 3. See Bail, 1981, op. cit., pp. 94 & 100 4. Eagle, M., \‘The Painter and the Raft\’, Bail, M., et. al., Fairweather, Art & Australia Books in association with Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 1994, p. 29 5. Conversation with Chris Deutscher, 24 July 2018 KIRSTY GRANT
Ian Fairweather -  Lit Bateau (the Raft At Night)

Ian Fairweather - Lit Bateau (the Raft At Night)

Original 1957
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 22
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Description: IAN FAIRWEATHER, (1891 – 1974), LIT BATEAU (THE RAFT AT NIGHT), 1957 , gouache on cardboard SIGNED: inscribed with title lower left: Lit Bateau signed with artist\’s monogram lower right: IF DIMENSIONS: 73.0 x 92.5 cm PROVENANCE: Lina Bryans Collection, Melbourne Thence by descent Private collection, Melbourne EXHIBITED: Ian Fairweather, Macquarie Galleries, Sydney, 20 November – 2 December 1957, cat. 16 Ian Fairweather, Museum of Modern Art of Australia, Melbourne, 19 – 29 August 1958, cat. 5 Fairweather: a retrospective exhibition, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 3 June – 4 July 1965; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 21 July – 22 August 1965; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 9 September – 10 October 1965; National Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, 26 October – 21 November 1965; Western Australian Art Gallery, Perth, 9 December 1965 – 16 January 1966; Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart, 10 February – 13 March 1966, cat. 87 Landfall: The Captain James Cook Bi-Centenary Exhibition of Australian Art, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 7 April – 30 June 1970, without cat. numbers Ian Fairweather 1891-1974, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 25 September – 6 November 1991, cat. 21 (A centenary commemoration in the Australian Art Project Gallery) Fairweather (Retrospective), Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 1 October – 27 November 1994; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 19 December – 19 February 1995; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 22 March – 7 May 1995, cat. 29 LITERATURE: Bail, M., Fairweather, Murdoch Books, Sydney, revised edition 2009, pl. 82, cat. 143, pp. 104, 106 (illus.), 143, 255 Bail, M., et al., Fairweather, An Art and Australia Book, Craftsman House, Sydney in association with the Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 1994, pl. 29, p. 33, p. 101 (illus.) ESSAY: Under the cover of darkness on 29 April 1952, Ian Fairweather left Darwin Harbour on a raft with the aim of sailing to Timor which, as he later told an interviewer, \‘(was) the next best thing to Bali where I had done the best painting of my life\’.1 According to the Times correspondent, \‘he built a triangular raft with three old aircraft fuel tanks which he found in a dump, and the minute sail was fashioned from three panels of old parachute canopy. The raft was stocked with some tinned food, eight gallons of water, a blanket, and a change of clothing, and he set out on a trade wind.\’2 Fairweather had researched the journey and studied the tides and, inspired in part by Thor Heyerdahl\’s legendary Kon-Tiki expedition, calculated that he would reach his destination within ten days.3 Sixteen days later however, \‘after hallucinating, and being given up for dead, wearing only one shoe, he collapsed on the sand in the moonlight … at Roti, the last dot on the map west of Indonesian Timor\’4 before the vast Indian Ocean. Peripatetic by nature, Fairweather was an inveterate and adventurous traveller, but the raft journey was risky at best, if not outright suicidal. Interrogated in Indonesia, he made it to Timor briefly before being sent to Bali, deported to Singapore and then (as a British citizen) shipped back to London where his passport was confiscated until he repaid the cost of his fare. In mid-1953 he returned to Australia and later that year settled on Bribie Island, off the coast of Queensland, where, for the rest of his life he would live and work in a pair of thatched huts and produce the finest paintings of his career. Lit Bateau (The Raft at Night), 1957 is one of a group of only five works – all made in 1957 – that refer to the notorious raft journey. Both this work and Lights, Darwin Harbour, 1957 (private collection, Sydne
Ian Fairweather - Painting Vi

Ian Fairweather - Painting Vi

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 6
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Ian Fairweather (1891-1974) Painting VI signed lower left: 'Ian Fairweather' polyvinyl acetate paint and gouache on cardboard 65.5 x 100.0cm (25 13/16 x 39 3/8in). Footnotes PROVENANCE Macquarie Galleries, Sydney Sir Tristan Antico, Sydney Sotheby's, Fine Australian Painting, Melbourne, 19 April 1994, lot 82, as 'Composition 200' Niagara Galleries, Melbourne Private collection Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane (label attached verso) Niagara Galleries, Melbourne Private collection, Sydney, acquired from the above in 1998 EXHIBITED possibly, Macquarie Galleries, 1960, cat.6 Ian Fairweather and Emily Kngwarreye, Niagara Galleries, Melbourne, 1995 Melbourne Art Fair, Phillip Bacon Galleries, 1998 LITERATURE Murray Bail, Fairweather, Murdoch Books, Sydney, 2009, p. 164 In November 1959 Ian Fairweather wrote to his gallerist Treania Smith at the Macquarie Galleries to say he was sending her a package of twenty paintings that he supposed would 'have to come under the heading of abstracts'. Fairweather wrote, in his usual slightly self-deprecating way, that they were mostly about 'nothing in particular'. He added that he had painted most of them on sheets of the local newspaper, the Brisbane Courier Mail, because that was all he had to hand. Five months later he sent another bundle of sixteen works, twelve of which were medium-sized and four smaller works painted on thin sheets of cardboard, all to be shown in a solo show in July. What these combined bodies of work signified in fact was a radical departure for the artist, whose previous work, if not entirely representational, at least carried strong narrative themes and recognisable subject matter. Ian Fairweather had been exhibiting with the Macquarie Galleries in Sydney since 1948 but always from a distance, packing his paintings and drawings himself and posting them down to Sydney from wherever he was living at the time – Cairns, Townsville, and finally, Bribie Island. While he was absent from the art scene physically, his reputation grew and the word slowly spread amongst those collectors 'in the know'. In spite of his success, however, he remained plagued by restlessness and anxiety and in 1952 undertook a now infamous raft sea voyage that he was lucky to survive. In 1953 he returned to Bribie Island and built his first hut, a rough shack assembled from pieces of driftwood, timber and plywood. He worked well with the Macquarie Galleries which was then run by Treania Smith, Lucy Swanton and Mary Turner, a uniquely female team to which he seemed to respond. With their support came both an income and an appreciation previously absent from his life and though to the outside world his lifestyle may have seemed eccentric and ramshackle, by 1960 he achieved a stability and constancy that had previously eluded him. A small circle of friends (Lawrence and Edit Daws, Pamela Bell, Margaret Olley, Rudy Komon and several local families) often visited to play chess, go fishing or just enjoy a tipple of Scotch with the artist. His daily routine was settled and calm and for the next five or six years he would create his most significant works. In an interview with Hazel de Berg in 1963 Fairweather related how in the 1930s he had developed lead poisoning from oil paint (probably from lead white), especially on one particular finger, and henceforth began to use gouache 1. During the 1940s he experimented with various pigments, mixing them with soap and casein (a protein taken from dairy food) in an effort to make them more stable, though many since have proved to be problematic. By 1958 he had discovered that if he mixed dry pigments with PVA (polyvinyl acetate) house paint the combination was more robust. This material (which he persisted in calling 'gouache') had the added bonus of being conveniently available at the local Bribie Island hardware store, no small matter for an artist living in a remote location. The end result is a thinning down of the paint which allowed for semi-transparent layers of colour of gossamer lightness in palettes of soft greys, browns and creamy whites. Some works, such as here with Painting VI, contained a thin but forceful calligraphic line in black paint which was also reduced and simplified, producing a more fluid, less hectic effect. All the works were executed on thin cardboard fixed to a sturdier support of thicker cardboard, and were painted horizontally on a large table, a physically demanding work method that he would soon abandon. Fairweather's favourite subject was always the human form. Wherever he was in the world he liked to depict people in their various guises and incarnations, mostly performing their ceremonies, a long-lasting effect of being abandoned by his parents and eight siblings when still a small baby. This choice of subject matter is in itself enough to distinguish him in the history of Australian art and perhaps accounts for a reticence amongst some collectors who preferred representations of the Australian landscape as depicted by Boyd, Nolan and Williams. As Australia has matured as a culture, however, so has our appreciation of Fairweather's work. Last Supper, 1958, and The Pool, 1959, both in the collection of the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, demonstrate the influences of Asia and the calligraphic line with an almost claustrophobic airlessness, making the sudden move into abstraction all the more dramatic. While in the abstract works we can still recognize the familiar subject – the tangled arms, breasts and torsos – they are here radically simplified. Colour is used in blocks instead of the more complicated patterns that distinguish works (both earlier and later) and the palette is more subdued. Many of the abstracts – as here with Painting VI – are 'framed' with a painted grey border, a feature he perhaps took from the work of the American artist Mark Rothko although it is most often applied with more clarity and definition. With these abstract works, Fairweather claimed not to be painting any subject in particular. They were, he said, 'sort of soliloquies', the Unconscious given form. Although he only painted a small number, they are 'breakthrough' works that enabled him a few years later to paint the elegiac compositions that are now acknowledged as his masterpieces – Monastery, 1961, collection of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Monsoon, 1961-2, collection of the Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, Shalimar 1962, collection of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Epiphany, 1962, collection of the Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, and Turtle and Temple Gong, 1965, collection of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; they are a bridge from a highly complex style to a more fluid, rhythmic form and belong to a body of work that would come to define his importance in Australian art. 1. Ian Fairweather interviewed by Hazel de Berg in the Hazel de Berg collection [sound recording] 30 March 1963, nla.gov.au/nla.cat-vn164436 Murray Bail, Ian Fairweather, Bay Books, Rushcutters Bay, 1981 Nourma Abbott-Smith, Ian Fairweather: Profile of a Painter, University of Queensland Press, St Lucia, 1978
Ian Fairweather - Scooters

Ian Fairweather - Scooters

Original 1950
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 24
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
IAN FAIRWEATHER, (1891 – 1974), SCOOTERS, 1950, gouache and watercolour on paper SIGNED: signed, dated and inscribed lower right: IF [in Chinese characters] / 1900 [in Chinese characters] 50 / Scooters DIMENSIONS: 58.5 x 72.5 cm PROVENANCE: Collection of Lina Bryans, Melbourne Thence by descent Private collection, Melbourne EXHIBITED: Fairweather: a Retrospective Exhibition, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 3 June – 4 July 1965; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 21 July – 22 August 1965; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 9 September – 10 October 1965; National Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, 26 October – 21 November 1965; Western Australian Art Gallery, Perth, 9 December 1965 – 16 January 1966; Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart, 10 February – 13 March 1966, cat. 85 Ian Fairweather 1891-1974, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 25 September – 6 November 1991, cat. 16 Fairweather, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 1 October – 27 November 1994; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 17 December 1994 – 19 February 1995, cat. 16 (label attached verso) The Drawings of Ian Fairweather, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 21 June – 24 August 1997; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 17 October – 7 December 1997; Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 7 February – 29 March 1998, cat. 23 (label attached verso) LITERATURE: Fisher, T., The Drawings of Ian Fairweather, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 1997, pp. 14, 20, pl. 7 (illus.) Bail, M., Fairweather, Murdoch Books, Sydney, revised edition, 2009, cat. 89, pp. 95, 251, pl. 72 (illus.) ESSAY: In the introduction to the catalogue for Ian Fairweather's nationally touring retrospective exhibition of 1965, curator Robert Smith wrote, ‘In his paintings Ian Fairweather has always been concerned with people – not as individuals, not as types, but as people: part of the vast unfolding tapestry of life’.1 In Scooters, 1950 line effortlessly captures and expresses movement as much through the figures of the young people as the scooters themselves. Murray Bail in his monograph on Fairweather refers to its ‘deliberate awkwardness’.2 It is an awkwardness, to my mind, that extends the feeling of movement and captures that feeling of momentary imbalance one may have when riding such wheeled vehicles – riding a bike or scooter is not always an elegant activity. This is allied to a feeling of freedom, colour free of form, line following its own circuitous fascinations, tapestry-like in its frontal, frieze-like and flattened patterning. There is a sense that the pigment is about to free itself from reality, the painting beautifully balanced between figuration and abstraction. As Fairweather said, ‘... I don't feel I am a complete abstractionist – I still like – perhaps mistakenly in this age of collectivism – to retain some relic of subjective reality’.3 The seeming simplicity of the work is arresting – a few gestures of line and colour and a work of fascination is created – a sure measure of Fairweather's masterly creativity. As fellow-artist and art critic James Gleeson wrote about Fairweather's art in general, ‘He can evoke a world of subtly fluctuating values with a palette almost entirely restricted to a range of earthy browns and greys that lie anywhere between black and white and are cooled or warmed with suggestions of blue or rose. With such limited means he conjures up organizations of colour that rival the lustre of a grey pearl’.4 After such fulfillment, should one dig deeper? Some see the figures of a girl (two girls?) and boy dramatically divided by a jagged fissure.5 Yet, their faces look too content for such perturbations. The outlining by black-edged, torn shapes gives emphasis to their figures. Moreover, while being an effective compositional device with an interlocking play between surface and the illusion of depth, it does remind that riding a scooter can be bumpy at times, for Fairweather's embrace is wide. 1. Smith, R., Fairweather: A Retrospective, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 1965, unpaginated 2. Bail, M., Fairweather, Murdoch Books, Sydney, revised edition, 2009, p. 94 3. The artist quoted in Bail, ibid., p. 140 4. Gleeson, J., 'Painting in Australia since 1945', Art and Australia, Ure Smith, Sydney, vol. 1, no. 1, May 1963, p. 7 5. Bail, op. cit., p. 94 DAVID THOMAS
Arcadja LogoServices
Subscription
Advertising
Sponsored Auctions
Subscription

Arcadja
Our Product
Follow Arcadja on Facebook
Follow Arcadja on Twitter
Follow Arcadja on Google+
Follow Arcadja on Pinterest
Follow Arcadja on Tumblr