Maria Oakey Dewing

(18451928 ) - Artworks
DEWING Maria Oakey Carnations

Sotheby's /May 22, 2002
215,982.72 - 323,974.08
440,138.93

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Artworks in Arcadja
6

Some works of Maria Oakey Dewing

Extracted between 6 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Maria Oakey Dewing - Spring Flowers With Roses, Daffodils

Maria Oakey Dewing - Spring Flowers With Roses, Daffodils

Original 1923
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Lot number: 52
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Lot Description Maria Oakey Dewing (1845-1927) Spring Flowers with Roses, Daffodils and Larkspur signed and dated 'Maria Oakey Dewing 1923' (lower right) oil on canvas 24 x 14 in. (61 x 35.6 cm.) Lot Condition Report I confirm that I have read this Important Notice and agree to its terms. View Condition Report Provenance [With]Milch Galleries, New York. Private collection, New Jersey. By descent to the present owner. Saleroom Notice Please note the provenance should read: [With]Milch Galleries, New York. Private collection, New Jersey. By descent to the present owner. View Lot Notes › Maria Oakey Dewing, wife of artist Thomas Wilmer Dewing, was a contemporary of John La Farge and William Merrit Chase, who found her inspiration in the landscape and nature. After moving back to New York City from the countryside, she turned her attention from depictions of the garden to those of beautiful vases overflowing with fresh flowers. In a letter written by Dr. Susan A. Hobbs, she describes teh meaning behind Dewing's artistic choices. The vase holds flowers in all stages of life, from the tightly curled buds, to the open soft petals of flowers that have matured, perhaps a subtle nod to the transience of life. The six types of flowers found in the composition are those that Dewing grew in her garden in Maine before moving back to New York.
Maria Oakey Dewing - Rose Garden

Maria Oakey Dewing - Rose Garden

Original 1901
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Gross Price
Lot number: 40
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signed maria oakey dewing and dated 1901, l.l. oil on canvas dr. susan hobbs, author of the forthcoming catalogue raisonné of the artist's work, has commented that the rose garden is probably maria dewing's finest work, especially with its unique stanford white designed frame. provenance mr. and mrs. whitelaw reid, new york (acquired directly from the artist) estate of mrs. whitelaw reid (sold: american art association-anderson galleries, new york, may 2, 1934, lot 305) mrs. j.w.s. reid (acquired at the above sale) t.r. baird, new york acquired by the present owner from the above, 1976 (sold: sotheby's, new york, may 24, 2000, lot 18, illustrated in color) acquired by the present owner at the above sale exhibited boston, massachusetts, copley society exhibition, 1902, no. 78 buffalo, new york, pan-american exhibition, 1901 (bronze medal) new york, national academy of design, ninety-eighth annual exhibition, 1923, no. 97 new york, milch galleries, 1923 tulsa, oklahoma, philbrook art center; new york, national academy of design, painters of the humble truth: american still life painting, september 1981-july 1982, no. 27, p. 147, illustrated p. 146, fig. 7.5 (detail) literature and references arthur edwin bye, pots and pans or studies in still-life painting, princeton, new jersey, 1921, p. 199 royal cortissoz, new york herald tribune, march 25, 1923 sadakichi hartmann, a history of american art, vol. 1, p. 249 jennifer a. martin, "the rediscovery of maria oakey dewing," the feminist art journal, summer 1976, p. 24 jennifer a. martin, "royal cortissoz and maria oakey dewing's 'rose garden'," the yale university library gazette 52, october 1977, pp. 84-88, illustrated jennifer a. martin, "portraits of flowers: the out-of-door still-life paintings of maria oakey dewing," american art review, vol. iv, no. 3, december 1977, pp. 114, 115, 118, illustrated in color p. 53 catalogue note maria oakey dewing was born in new york city in 1845. she grew up in a cultured environment and her interest in writing and painting was encouraged by her family. though she initially wanted to become a writer, she decided at age seventeen to devote herself to painting. she received her early training at the cooper union school of design for women in 1866 and later studied under john la farge, whose influence is particularly evident in her beautiful plein air paintings of flowers. by 1875, dewing had established herself as an artist and was one of the primary motivators behind the formation of the art student's league in new york. one of her classmates wrote of her role among her peers, "maria oakey...was looked upon as a distinguished student on account of her work being exhibited in the academy, and attracting so much attention for its broad, vigorous brushstroke, and rich, glowing color. she gave the impetus of her prestige to the new league" (as quoted in martin, "portraits of flowers: the out-of-door still-life paintings of maria oakey dewing," american art review, december 1977, pp. 52, 55). in 1881, maria oakey married thomas wilmer dewing, and her primary subject matter began to shift away from figure painting, for which her husband was established as one of the finest talents, toward gardens and flowers, painted spontaneously out of doors. from 1885 to 1903, the dewings spent their summers in cornish, new hampshire, where thomas cultivated a garden and both husband and wife devoted themselves to their work. jennifer martin writes, " there, at the home she called 'doveridge,' she executed many of the plein air flower paintings. the beauty of the new hampshire landscape stimulated her creativity, just as it motivated a host of artists and writers who flocked to cornish during those years. "...in her cornish garden she spent long hours studying the growth patterns, textures, and dispositions of the individual plants in order to nurture her 'garden thirsty soul.' she firmly believed that a painter of nature must bind himself to a 'long apprenticeship in the garden.' yet, for her, a flower painting was not to be a 'mere reproduction' of reality but 'picturemaking'... "her composition, which is similar in all of the pictures...contributes importantly to the sense of animation. the use of the highest lights in the foreground...not only emphasizes the immediacy of the composition, but also contributes to a feeling of depth. the sensation of depth is also implied by the overlapping of forms as in rose garden, where roses peek through the mass of green foliage, and by the rather less defined areas in the upper center...in such a two-dimensional surface where forms move out toward the frame, the viewer has an immediate sense of intimacy with growing life and, concurrently, a sense of awe. "...the originality of her paintings was noted by [arthur e.] bye who wrote: 'these remarkable works are absolutely unique. there is nothing like them in the field of flower painting,' and by royal cortissoz, authoritative critic for the new york herald tribune, who wrote after her death, 'the salient trait of maria oakey dewing, was the strain of originality that characterized her deep feeling for beauty--there was no mistaking her quality, her accent...she knew how to interpret the soul of a flower--but her principal aim was to make it a work of art...save for john la farge we have had no one who could work with flowers the magic that was hers" ("portraits of flowers: the out-of-door still-life paintings of maria oakey dewing," pp. 55, 114-16). though dewing's work was largely unknown in this century until martin began to write of her rediscovery in 1976, she was widely recognized and praised during her own lifetime. on the occasion of the exhibition of the present work at the national academy of design in 1923, mr. cortissoz wrote in the new york herald tribune, "mrs. dewing's 'rose garden' leads the paintings of flowers through the beauty of design it possesses, its delicacy in the detachment of white and pink blossoms against a background of heavenly green, and its distinguished style. it is painted in a singularly reticent and haunting key" (royal cortissoz and maria oakey dewing's 'rose garden,' the yale university library gazette, october 1977, p. 87).
Maria Oakey Dewing - Portrait Of Dr. Charles Carroll Lee

Maria Oakey Dewing - Portrait Of Dr. Charles Carroll Lee

Original 1914
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Lot number: 608
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Maria Oakey Dewing (American1845-1927) Portrait of Dr. Charles Carroll Lee Signed Maria Oakey Dewing and dated 1914 l.r.; alsoinscribed Painted by Maria Oakey Dewing/1914 onreverse Oil on canvas 14 x 12 in (35.6 x 30.5 cm) Estimate $5,000-10,000 Exhibited: Cornish Colony Gallery & Museum, Cornish, New Hampshire Note : Dr. Charles Carroll Lee was the great-nephew of Catharine CarrollHarper (Mrs. Robert Goodloe Harper- see lot 579) of Carroll County,MD. A former schoolmate and friend of John LaFarge from Mount St.Mary's, Dr. Lee collected European and American artwork andpresumably became acquainted with Maria Oakey Dewing through herconnection to John LaFarge and the Cornish Artist's Colony in NewHampshire. In 1947, Dr. Lee's son, Washington cardiologist Dr.Thomas Sim Lee, donated a part of his father's art collection toMount St. Mary's in his father's memory.
Maria Oakey Dewing - Carnations

Maria Oakey Dewing - Carnations

Original 1901
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Gross Price
Lot number: 37
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Description:
signed signed maria oakey dewing and dated 1901, u.r.; also titled, signed and dated carnations/painted by maria oakey dewing/1901 on the reverse prior to lining oil on canvas the dr. susan hobbs writes, "known for the 'haunting and irresistible beauty' of her flower paintings, as the new york times described them in 1914, maria oakey dewing rendered this work called carnations as a vivid study in complementary hues of reds and blue green.(1) crimson carnations stand in stunning contrast to the vibrant turquoise of an exotic patterned fabric. the ornate richness of this floral backdrop forms a fascinating counterpoint to the spare bouquet in a japanese vase. "the finesse with which maria oakey dewing defined the play of light over form and texture suggests her deep veneration for the works of vermeer. she admired the way that the dutch artist used atmosphere to bathe objects so that it 'reveals and obscures.'(2) similarly, in the shadowed folds she depicted in this painting, maria oakey dewing allowed light to show where the pattern is lost and then found again, lending depth and visual interest to the background behind the still life. even the vase itself is softly defined, its edges melting into the surrounding atmosphere. this complexity extends to the rich reflections of the mahogany table top as well. but, the primary focus is upon the thinly and delicately painted carnations rendered in oakey dewing's unmistakable fashion, with just a touch of white impasto as highlights to bring them forward to the viewer. "the artist showcased this work as carnations in a satsuma vase at her 1907 one woman exhibition at the pennsylvania academy of the fine arts. in a written description in her family papers, she called the picture, 'my finest achievement in painting.' it was in fact, one of two very similar canvases--the other owned by famous artist william m. chase--who liked to refer to her 'inimitable flowers.' in her own description of the work, she continued, '[critic royal] cortissoz says it is "consumate [sic]" "like all my still lifes"-so he thinks.'(3) "the painting demonstrates her interest in asian art and the impact that it had on her subtle, yet provocative designs. she admired the abstractions of japanese art, a quality we see here in the slightly off center, barely diagonal composition, the love of simplicity, and the spare arrangement of just a few artfully displayed carnations.(4) just such a vase with carnations appears in a painting called a reading by her husband, thomas dewing. a reporter once claimed that she helped paint the flowers in his works, which might explain the similarity of this painting to the almost identical centerpiece found in the work of her spouse.(5) "maria oakey dewing was noted for her rare ability to fuse keen botanical observation with a deep reverence for the flowers that she painted. she captured their essence, surrounded them with atmosphere and suggested the mystery of nature. 'a japanese would understand the point of view of maria oakey dewing' wrote a turn of the century writer on still life painting as he praised the singularity of this remarkable and unusual artist.(6) royal cortissoz agreed, announcing that she possessed a 'place apart in american painting.'"(7) this painting will be included in dr. susan hobbs' forthcoming catalogue raisonné of the artist's work. (1) review, the new york times, march 18, 1914, p. 10:7 (2) maria oakey dewing, "flower painters and what the flower offers to art," art and progress, vol. 6, june 1915, p. 260 (3) inscribed paper, thomas wilmer dewing and maria oakey dewing papers, archives of american art (4) maria oakey dewing "flower painters and what the flower offers to art," p. 258 (5) polly king, "women decorative painters," art interchange, 34, may 1895, p. 124 (6) edwin arthur bye, pots and pans, or studies in still life painting, princeton, new jersey, 1921, p. 19 (7) "little art shows of the spring," new york tribune, march 17, 1914, p. 9 provenance: thomas wilmer dewing (the artist's husband), 1927 elizabeth dewing kaup (their daughter), 1938 acquired by the present owner's family from the above, circa 1960 exhibited: buffalo, new york, pan-american exposition, 1901, no. 634 (awarded a bronze medal) philadelphia, pennsylvania, the pennsylvania academy of the fine arts, seventy-second annual exhibition, 1903, no. 83 philadelphia, pennsylvania, the pennsylvania academy of the fine arts, an exhibition of paintings by maria oakey dewing, march 1907, no. 9 (as carnations in a satsuma vase) buffalo, new york, albright art gallery, ninth annual exhibition of selected paintings by american artists, may-august 1914, no. 38 new york, arden galleries, december 1925 literature: file photograph, frick art reference library, new york dictionary of american biography, vol. 3, p. 273 (as carnations in a satsuma vase) jennifer a. martin, "the rediscovery of maria oakey dewing," the feminist art journal, summer 1976, illustrated p. 26 (as carnations in a vase) jennifer a. martin, "portraits of flowers: the out-of-door still-life paintings of maria oakey dewing," american art review, vol. iv, no. 3, december 1977, illustrated in color p. 48 (as carnations in a vase)
Maria Oakey Dewing - Poppies And Italian Mignonette

Maria Oakey Dewing - Poppies And Italian Mignonette

Original 1891
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Gross Price
Lot number: 10
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Description:
maria oakey dewing (1845-1927) poppies and italian mignonette signed maria oakey dewing and dated 1891, l.r. oil on canvas 23 by 17 in. (58.4 by 43.2 cm.); framed: 38 by 31 1/2 in. (96.5 by 80 cm.) painted in cornish, new hampshire, poppies and italian mignonette is a striking example of the floral paintings that earned maria oakey dewing her reputation as a unique talent in the field of flower painting. in 1881, maria married the artist thomas wilmer dewing, and her primary subject matter shifted away from figure painting, for which her husband was widely recognized, toward gardens and flowers painted spontaneously, en plein air. from 1885 to 1903 the dewings spent the summer months in cornish, where as members of the local artists' colony they devoted themselves to painting. karen e. hass writes, "among the summer residents, the dewings had one of the most extensive gardens, modeled, like those of most of their neighbors, on the english-style cottage gardens that were then enjoying a popular revival. abundantly planted and informally laid out, the dewings' flower beds were filled with old-fashioned blooms, such as hollyhocks, roses, lilies, irises, foxgloves, peonies and poppies. during their years in cornish, maria developed into an avid amateur botanist and plein air painter, and came to believe that any artist wishing to paint from nature must first commit himself to 'a long apprenticeship in the garden.' she prided herself on her careful observation of plants and her ability to capture their individual growing habits, claiming: 'when i paint flowers, i paint more than i see. i paint what i know is there. for example, i know how the poppy bursts its calyx, so that when i paint poppies they are true to nature'" (addison gallery of american art: 65 years, p. 356). poppies and italian mignonette was originally owned by charles lang freer, a devoted patron of thomas' work, who commissioned the artist to design the interiors of his home in detroit and supported his travels in europe. freer visited the dewings in cornish on a number of occasions and also helped thomas build a second studio there. the present work and bed of poppies (addison gallery, phillips academy, andover, massachusetts) are maria's only paintings of poppies, which grew abundantly in the dewing's cornish garden. addressing edwin c. shaw, the original owner of bed of poppies, dewing wrote about the present work "i never painted any other poppies but one picture that was owned by mr. freer. it is smaller than yours and i painted it at cornish ... those freer poppies grew in a large bed mixed with tall white mignonette that grows wild in italy and was tamed to the garden here by a nurseryman named childs. i never saw it anywhere else than in our cornish garden" (jennifer a. martin, american art review, p. 118). stanford white was also among the regular visitors to cornish and he formed a closed relationship with the dewings over the many summers they spent together. in addition to the country houses upon which he built his reputation, white designed unique frames for both maria and thomas' paintings; the present work retains its original stanford white frame. maria oakey dewing's paintings were widely recognized and highly praised during her lifetime. according to jennifer a. martin, "the originality of her paintings was noted by [arthur e.] bye who wrote: 'these remarkable works are absolutely unique. there is nothing like them in the field of flower painting,' and by [royal] cortissoz, authoritative critic for the new york herald tribune, who wrote after her death, 'the salient trait of maria oakey dewing, was the strain of originality that characterized her deep feeling for beauty-there was no mistaking her quality, her accent ... she knew how to interpret the soul of a flower-but her principal aim was to make it a work of art ... save for la farge we have had no one who could work with flowers the magic that was hers'" (martin, pp. 115-6). provenance: charles lang freer, detroit, michigan (gift from the artist) mrs. morton lown (his niece), 1917 by descent to the present owner exhibited: philadelphia, pennsylvania, pennsylvania academy of the fine arts, 1907 literature: dictionary of american biography new york public library, clipping file archives of american art, edwin c. shaw papers, roll 1124, frame 646 maria oakey dewing, "flower painters and what the flower offers to art," art and progress, june 1915, illustrated arthur edwin bye, pots and pans or studies in still-life painting, princeton, new jersey, 1921, p. 199 frank mather, american spirit in art, new haven, connecticut, 1927, vol. 12, illustrated jennifer a. martin, "portraits of flowers: the out-of-door still-life paintings of maria oakey dewing," american art review, vol. iv, no. 3, december 1977, p. 118 addison gallery of american art: 65 years, addison gallery, phillips academy, andover, massachusetts, 1996, p. 356
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