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Juan De Espinosa

Spain (1628 -  1659 ) Wikipedia® : Juan De Espinosa
DE ESPINOSA Juan Still Life With Fruit, Sweets, Flowers And A Winecooler; Still Life With Fruit, Cauliflower, Bread And Vessels

Sotheby's
Dec 4, 2013
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Artworks in Arcadja
7

Some works of Juan De Espinosa

Extracted between 7 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Juan De Espinosa - Still Life With Fruit, Sweets, Flowers And A Winecooler; Still Life With Fruit, Cauliflower, Bread And Vessels

Juan De Espinosa - Still Life With Fruit, Sweets, Flowers And A Winecooler; Still Life With Fruit, Cauliflower, Bread And Vessels

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 12
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Don Francisco Sanz de Cortes, 1

st

Marquis of Villaverde (1623 – 1686), Zaragoza;

Thence by family descent until acquired by the present owner during the late 1990s.

12

PROPERTY FROM A SPANISH COLLECTION

Juan de Espinosa

MADRID CIRCA 1605/10 – 1671 ZARAGOZA

STILL LIFE WITH FRUIT, SWEETS, FLOWERS AND A WINECOOLER; STILL LIFE WITH FRUIT, CAULIFLOWER, BREAD AND VESSELS

Quantity: 2

inscribed on the reverse of each canvas lining: V.

a

V.

e

a pair, both oil on canvas

each: 79.2 by 162 cm.; 31 1/8 by 63 3/4 in.

GBP

Print Please notify me when the condition report is available
Juan De Espinosa - Still Life With Fruit

Juan De Espinosa - Still Life With Fruit

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 588
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Juan de Espinosa (documented 1628 – 1659)
Still Life with Fruit, Vegetables and Wild Fowl, oil on canvas, 88.5 x 65 cm, framed

Provenance:
Conti Marazzani Visconti Terzi, Piacenza;
Private European collection

Literature:
P. Cherry, Arte y Naturaleza. El Bodegon Espanol en el Siglo de Oro, Aranjuez 1999, p. 214, no. 147 (as attributed to Juan de Espinosa) A perspectiva das coisas. A Natureza-Morta na Europa, ed. by P. Cherry, exhibition catalogue, Museu Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon 2010, p. 212,
fig. 121 (as Juan de Espinosa)

We are grateful to Peter Cherry, who published the present painting in 1999 as \“attributed to Juan de Espinosa\“ , but who has subsequently confirmed the work as a fully autograph work by Juan de Espinosa, following the examination of the present painting in the original.

Juan de Espinosa specialized in the genre of bodegones and the present work appears to be a complex composition that was most probably commissioned by a sophisticated patron. The compositional elements appear interrelated and in all probability were combined to form a symbolic representation of the cycle of life.
The lower left of the painting shows several vegetables including a cucumber, an allusion to the male, and aubergines, which seem to allude to the female. The aubergine in the foreground is reminiscent of the head of a snake sticking out its forked tongue. The snake has always symbolised deception and the spirit of evil. From the union of man and woman springs new life, and youth, in its freshness and vigour, displays itself in the painting\’\’\’\’s upper section, in the form of a bowl of fruit filled with apples, plums, and grapes. On the right a cabbage flanked by two birds are united in an embrace. This kiss appears as the painting\’\’\’\’s focus, as if to symbolise that death terminates earthly life but offers the chance of immortal love. The cycle of life continues.

Little is known about the life and career of Juan de Espinosa. He was first documented in 1628, on the occasion of his wedding. This was when Antonio Ponce (1608 – after 1662), his painter colleague, also married, so that it can be assumed that the two were of approximately the same age and that Juan de Espinosa was already active as a painter at the time. In the collection of Francisco Merchant de la Cerda fifteen paintings by Espinosa are mentioned in the 1662 inventory of the collection; also listed are twenty-one still lifes by Juan van der Hamen and two by Juan Fernandez, called El Labrador. The great number of still lifes by Espinosa in this collection is an important indicator of the high reputation he enjoyed. (P. Cherry, Arte y Naturaleza. El Bodegon Espanol en el Siglo de Oro, Aranjuez 1999, p. 102).

Espinosa is frequently confused with two artists of the same name; one of them, the artist\’\’\’\’s senior, was active in Madrid and Toledo as a painter of bodegones, whereas the other was the considerably younger court painter named Juan Bautista de Espinosa (see P. Cherry, op. cit., p. 209).

The dominant motif in Espinosa\’\’\’\’s still lifes are pieces of fruit, primarily grapes, which he rendered with great mastery and which seem to glow from within. The detailed representation of fruit and the employment of contre-jour in order to make the vine tendrils stand out against the light are stylistically reminiscent of works by Juan Fernández, called El Labrador. Espinosa probably responded to an increased demand for bodegones by El Labrador in Madrid, where it was difficult to obtain the latter\’\’\’\’s works as the artist rarely visited the town. Espinosa\’\’\’\’s special glazing technique seems to have enabled him to depict the transparency of grapes in a unique manner. They are characterized by an unmistakable radiance and crystalline brilliance in which they differ from the subdued chiaroscuro and tenderness of the more richly nuanced surfaces of the grapes in El Labrador\’\’\’\’s works. A further element that frequently appears in Espinosa\’\’\’\’s still lifes are dead birds. The depiction of a dead bird on a stone slab in the painting Still Life with Grapes, Fruit and an Earthenware Jug from the Naseiro Collection (op. cit., plate LV) may even be an ironic illusion to the story of grapes associated with Zeuxis. According to Plini,in the 5th Century BC, Zeuxis painted grapes in a wall painting so deceptively realistically that birds nibbled at them. With the dead birds Espinosa may also be alluding to the genre of the bodegones as \“naturaleza muerta\” (\“dead nature\”).

The present painting confirms that Juan de Espinosa was an artist whose works distinguish themselves by visual ingenuity and originality as well as painterly quality. The Spanish still lifes dating from this period show that the Spanish artists not only possessed skills of visual representation, but also reveal a great talent for composition together with a pronounced spatial awareness.
Juan De Espinosa - A Triptych

Juan De Espinosa - A Triptych

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 135
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
oil on panel
PROVENANCE

PROVENANCE

Thought to have been acquired by the present owner's family
about fifty years ago.

LITERATURE AND REFERENCES

C.R. Post,
A History of Spanish Painting
, 2nd Ed., New
York 1976, vol. XIII, pp. 198-99, reproduced fig. 78.

CATALOGUE NOTE

These three panels originally formed the central sections of the
bottom register of the retable for the chapel of St. Caprasius or
Cabras in the churchof San Miguel in Tarazona in western Aragon.
The retable is documented as being completed on 3 October 1533. St.
Caprasius was the martyred bishop saint of Agen in France.
Juan De Espinosa - Bodegón

Juan De Espinosa - Bodegón

Original
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Lot number: 573
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
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