Herri Met De Bles

Netherlands (14851560 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Herri Met De Bles
BLES Herri met de An Extensive Landscape With The Banishment Of Hagar

Christie's /Apr 19, 2007
73,524.01 - 110,286.01
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Variants on Artist's name :

Met De Bles Herri

Herri Met De Bles, Il Civetta

 

Artworks in Arcadja
42

Some works of Herri Met De Bles

Extracted between 42 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Herri Met De Bles - The Journey To Emmaus

Herri Met De Bles - The Journey To Emmaus

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Lot number: 206
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206 Herri met de Bles BOUVINES CIRCA 1510 - AFTER 1550 ANTWERP (?) THE JOURNEY TO EMMAUS signed lower center with the owl device oil on panel 12 5/8 by 20 in.; 32 by 50.6 cm. Estimate 80,000 - 120,000 USD Print Please notify me when the condition report is available
Herri Met De Bles - The Penitent Mary Magdalen In A Cave Of La Sainte-baume

Herri Met De Bles - The Penitent Mary Magdalen In A Cave Of La Sainte-baume

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Lot number: 25
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Herri met de Bles (Dinant c. 1510-after 1550 Antwerp) The Penitent Mary Magdalen in a cave of La Sainte-Baume oil on panel, laid down on panel 22.5 x 29 cm. Dr. Alfons Jaffé, Berlin and Leiden; Seized by the 'Diensstelle Mühlmann' following the Occupation of The Netherlands, after May 1940; Acquired for the 'Sonderauftrag Linz' (No. 1835); Recovered by the Western Allies, Munich Central Collecting Point, 10 July 1945 (MCCP no. 3613); Transferred to the Stichting Nederlands Kunstbezit, The Netherlands, 15 February 1946 (Inv. no. G43) Restituted to Dr. Alfons Jaffé, Oxford, February 1948. Hans A. Wetzlar, Amsterdam, by 1952. with Kunsthandel P. de Boer, Amsterdam, by 1955. Private Collection, U.S.A.Rwith J. Kraus, Paris/London, by 1980. with K. Waterman, Amsterdam, by 1981, where acquired by the present owner. M.J. Friedländer, Collection Dr. H. Wetzlar, Amsterdam, 1952, p. 9, no. 8. E. Buijsen, 'Notes on two new views of "La Sainte-Baume" by Henri met de Bles', in The Rutgers Art Review, 1986, VII, pp. 55-61, fig. 2, as Attributed to Henri met de Bles. M.J. Friedländer, Early Netherlandish Painting, XIII, Leiden, 1975, no. 100. Berlin, Galerie Dr. Gottschewski Dr. Schaäfer, Das Flämische Landschaftsbild des 16. und 17. Jahrhunderts, 6-30 November 1927, p. 10, no. 9. Amsterdam and Munich (Bayerisches Hof), K. & V. Waterman, Niederländische Meisterwerke des 17. Jahrhunderts, 18 April-1 May 1981, p. 72. Surprisingly little is known about the life of Herri met de Bles. He is generally identified as the "Herry de Patinir" who was registered as a master of the Antwerp Guild of Saint Luke in 1535, and who may have been the nephew of Joachim Patinir. Unquestionably, these two artists were at the forefront of the newly-emerging genre of landscape painting in the southern Netherlands, and following Joachim Patinir's death in 1524, Herri became the genre's leading and most prolific practitioner. While the two painters worked in similar styles, Herri met de Bles eschewed Patinir's structured, planar compositions in favor of more chaotic, spectacular constructions. Herri's mountains rise more naturally from the plains below and his background landscapes are much more atmospheric; subtle cool blues and blue-whites often veil the distant prospect, contrasting with the warm greens of the foliage in the foreground. Herri's mountains are usually painted in soft tones ranging from pinks to brownish purples, while his pictures teem with the myriad details of life. Herri met de Bles appears to have enjoyed considerable fame in Italy, where he was known as "Civetta" due to the little owl that frequently appears in his paintings. It is important to note, however, that not all of Herri's paintings contain an owl, nor does the mere presence of an owl indicate his authorship of a given landscape. In 1986, Edwin Buijsen identified the majestic rock formation that dominates the present panel as a representation of La Sainte-Baume, where according to legend Mary Magdalene lived for thirty years in penance for the sins that she committed before her conversion (op. cit.). This vista was a favored subject in the southern Netherlands (see R. Kock, 'La Sainte-Baume in Flemish Landscape Painting of the 16th Century', in Gazette des Beaux-Arts, LXVI, 1965, pp. 273-282), and was often paired with representations of the Magdalene in ecstasy, as in the present example. According to legend, after Christ's Passion, Mary Magdalene travelled to France via Marseilles, eventually retreating to a grotto in the wilderness near Aix-en-Provence. Each day, angels would carry her up into heaven, where she was greeted and nourished by the chanting of the celestial hosts. During the Middle Ages, La Sainte-Baume and the Magdalene's grave in St. Maximin - a village near the mountain where it was believed that she died and was buried - both became popular pilgrimage sites, particularly for Flemish travelers. As Buijsen observed, the present painting relates to a Mountain landscape with La Sainte-Baume and the Ecstasy of Mary Magdalene in the Kunsthaus, Zurich, that was probably painted by a member of Joachim Patinir's workshop after a lost prototype by the master himself (Ruzicka-Stiftung, no. 24; see E. Buijsen, op. cit., fig. 3). The most detailed and accurate view of the holy site appears in the background of a wing with the Ecstasy of Mary Magdalene from a triptych attributed to the Master of 1518 in the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium, Brussels. This earlier view appears to have been based on firsthand observation, and may have been the primary source for representations of La Sainte-Baume in the southern Netherlands. Notably, although the views by Patinir and Met de Bles do not correspond exactly with the topography of the actual site, key identifying elements are retained, such as the winding path leading to the plateau, the steep mountainside, the small chapel of St. Pilon at the mountaintop, and the vertical "chimney-like" rock formations on the left side of the mountain. While in reality, La Sainte-Baume is part of a larger mountain range, Patinir and Met de Bles chose to represent it in isolation, rising sharply against the horizon. Herri met de Bles presumably knew Patinir's version, as many details correspond almost exactly, such as the winding path, the wooden footbridge in the foreground, the shed in the middle ground and the buildings on the plateau. Of course, the presence of the Magdalene recumbent in the grotto in the foreground of the present panel would assist the contemporary viewer in identifying the view in the background as La Sainte-Baume. Moreover, as Buijsen observed, the smaller figures that populate the painting may also correspond to events in the life of Mary Magdalene (op. cit., p. 60). Specifically, the old, bearded pilgrim who is led toward the bridge in the foreground by a boy dressed in red, refers to an anecdote from the Golden Legend that describes how a blind man embarked on a pilgrimage to see the Magdalene's relics at Vzelay, where they had been transferred during the time of Charlemagne. When his guide informed him that the church could be seen in the distance, the old man cried out "O holy Mary Magdalene, if only I could sometime be worthy to see your church!" Immediately, his vision was miraculously restored to him. Luc Serck has confirmed the attribution to Herri met de Bles upon firsthand inspection of the panel, noting in particular the characteristic treatment of the delicate foliage in the foreground as well as typical appearance of the underdrawing, which is now visible beneath the pigments of the mountain (written communication, dated 14 March 2011, in the possession of the owner).
Herri Met De Bles - A Siege At Thérouanne, With An Army Led By Charles V Encamped Below The City

Herri Met De Bles - A Siege At Thérouanne, With An Army Led By Charles V Encamped Below The City

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Lot number: 4
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Herri met de Bles (Bouvines, active c. 1510) A siege at Thérouanne, with an army led by Charles V encamped below the city signed with the artist's owl device (lower right) oil on panel 46½ x 71¼ in. (118.1 x 181 cm.) with identifying(?) inscriptions 'HERTOGHE·VAN·WLLE·BERGEG' (lower right, on a tent), 'BISCOP·VANTVRNAXX[I?]GRA[F?]' (centre left, on a tent), 'NOMEN[...]' (lower left, on the tabard of a commander) and 'MOROSVSDEVISSE' (centre, on a tent) Pre-Lot Text The Property of a European Princely Family Provenance Karl August Lingner (1861-1916), entrepreneur and philanthropist, circa 1880, and by inheritance to the present owners. Literature P. Martens, 'La puissance de l'artillerie de Charles Quint au milieu du XVIe siècle: le sìege de Thérouanne en 1553', in N. Faucherre and N. Prouteau, eds., Artillerie et fortifications 1200-1550 (Actes du Colloque international à Pathenay (Deux-Sèvres), 1-3 décembre 2006), Rennes, illustrated (forthcoming). P. Martens, 'The sieges of Thérouanne: a woodcut by Cornelis Anthonisz. and its reuse in other prints and paintings', The Rijksmuseum Bulletin, illustrated (forthcoming). Lot Notes Despite the fame that Herri met de Bles's pictures enjoyed in his lifetime, little is known about his life and confusion still exists as to the precise location of his birth and even the correct formulation of his name. It has been suggested that he was the 'Herri de Patenir' who was recorded in the Antwerp artists' guild in 1535, and that he was possibly a nephew of Joachim Patinir. Very few pictures by de Bles and his studio bear dates and the absence of biographical data frustrates any attempt to determine a detailed chronological order to his oeuvre. Additionally, the sheer number of pictures in de Bles's oeuvre suggest that deviations, both in form and execution, are due to the intervention of one or more collaborators, even though it is evident that they worked very closely under his supervision. The present painting is exceptional within the artist's corpus. Its sheer size makes it not only his largest known composition, but also one of the largest panels for the genre in the mid-sixteenth century. Moreover, the subject matter is unlike anything previously attributed to de Bles; whilst most of his landscapes contain religious themes, the subject of this picture seems to be purely historical. However, the panel, replete with myriad details of sixteenth century camp life, is entirely consistent with other paintings such as The Conversion of Saint Paul on the Road to Damascus (sold Christie's, New York, 25 January 2002, lot 47) in both its viewpoint and narrative detail. Unlike Patinir, de Bles's mountains rise more naturally from the plains below and his background landscapes are much more atmospheric; subtle cool blues and blue-whites veil the distant prospect, contrasting with the warm greens of the foliage in the foreground. The central rocky outcrop in the present painting also appears in his Landscape with the Sacrifice of Isaac (Cincinnati Art Museum) and Landscape with the Parable of the Good Shepherd (Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum). The subject of the present painting - while open for debate - takes as its source a woodcut of The Siege of Thérouanne (Hollstein XXX, no. 44; see fig. 1) signed with the monogram of Cornelis Anthonisz. (c. 1505-1553). Until recently, it had been assumed that the print depicted the Siege of Thérouanne by the Imperial forces of Charles V in 1553, the year of Anthonisz.'s death, which also would account for the fact that the print remained incomplete. However, both Dr. Peter Martens ('La destruction de Thérouanne et d'Hesdin par Charles Quint en 1553', in G. Bleick et al., La fortresse à l'épreuve du temps, Paris, 2007, pp. 63-117; and doctoral dissertation, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 2009, pp. 355-83 and figs. 5.1-33) and Mr. Jan van Helmont (private communication) have convincingly argued that the print actually depicts the earlier, less well-known siege of the city in 1537, thus giving that date as a terminus post quem for the present picture. Recent infrared reflectography reveals extensive underdrawing that seems to link the initial composition more closely to the print than the finished painting reflects. There are significant changes in design from the drawn to the painted stages, with a different layout of the various encampments as well as a repositioning of the distant ruined castle in the centre from a lower to a higher position (see fig. 2). There is also evidence of 'squaring up', used to transfer preliminary drawings or perhaps the design of the print to the primed panel. A painting of this size and with this much narrative must have been a specific commission, about which we can only speculate. However, the numerous topographical differences between the print and the painting suggest that rather than this being a contemporary depiction of the siege of Thérouanne, de Bles had chosen to portray an almost generic scene of an army besieging a town. For a painting that should be a historical document there is no identifying inscription; the central rocky outcrop is a fanciful addition to the topography; the depiction of Charles V on horseback just behind the cavalry contingent is imaginary, as he was not present at either the 1537 or the 1553 siege, and the numerous coats-of-arms (with the exception of the Imperial Eagle) and the identifying inscriptions on the tents all appear to be fictitious, while those in the print are real and relate to the protagonists who were present at the 1537 siege. Above the coat-of-arms on the white tent in the foreground sits an owl, which, from the sixteenth century onwards, has always been taken as the 'hallmark' or signature of works by Herri met de Bles. Gian Paolo Lomazzo (Trattato dell'arte de la Pittura..., Milan, 1584, pp. 475 and 689) refers to the painter as 'Henerico Blessio Boemo, Chiamato de la Civetta [little owl] principal pittore de paesi', while Karel van Mander (Het Schilder-boeck, Amsterdam, 1603/4, fol. 219v) calls him 'Den Meester van den uil' (the master of the owl), adding 'His works can often be found with the Emperor, in Italy and in other places; in Italy they are particularly sought after, for the man with the little owl is very widely famed'.
Herri Met De Bles - An Extensive Landscape With The Banishment Of Hagar

Herri Met De Bles - An Extensive Landscape With The Banishment Of Hagar

Original 1535
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Lot number: 10
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Herri Met de Bles b. Bouvines c. 1510
An extensive landscape with the Banishment of Hagar
Add. Notes: Oil on panel 9¼ x 13 7/8 in. 23.5 x 35.4 cm. Provenance
Notes: Herri met de Bles is often discussed together with Joachim Patinir (c. 1480-1524), in part because they were the two earliest practitioners of landscape painting in the southern Netherlands and in part because a family connection between them has long been thought to exist. Certain characteristics are typical of both artists' works, among them expansive landscapes seen from a 'bird's eye' view, the use of small-scale figures to introduce narrative, and the inclusion of distinctive rock formations. As in Landscape with the banishment of Hagar, the majority of the picture space in such works is taken up with a landscape view encompassing hills, valleys, rivers, and distant mountains. The landscape is divided into zones, accented by shifts in the palette from the greens and browns of the foreground to the blues of the middleground and distance. The narrative often seems, if not incidental, not entirely central to the scene and the relationship between the figures and the landscape in this painting is a particularly dramatic example. Indeed, Abraham, Hagar, and Ishmael, who appear in the foreground left, are dwarfed by the landscape and, apart from the man's emphatic gesture, there is nothing that identifies them as anything other than travelers on a road. deviates in certain respects from the compositional formula that met de Bles most often used. In St. John the Baptist preaching (Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum) (fig. 1), for example, fantastic rock formations dominate the foreground on the left as a distant view opens up at the right. The landscape in the Goudstikker painting is less abruptly divided between foreground and background, transitioning more subtly between them and giving more space to the atmospheric village scenes in the middleground. Met de Bles' rock formations also tend to be more dramatic than the conical mountain in the background of this painting and are generally considered to be more fanciful than those of Patinir. Indeed, his works have been described as "border[ing] on the surreal" (Martin Royalton-Kisch, The Burlington Magazine, 2000, p. 717) and it is from this kind of landscape that, according to Friedländer, Pieter Bruegel the Elder saved Flemish painting through his direct study of nature. Despite a substantial amount of recent research on the artist, facts about met de Bles' life have remained elusive. None of his paintings are signed and the only secure date in his career is 1535 when a 'Herri de Patinir,' who is assumed to be Herri met de Bles (his Flemish nickname referring to a lock or 'blaze' of his hair), became a master in the Antwerp Guild of St. Luke. He frequently used the motif of an owl in place of a signature, which led to his Italian nickname, 'Civetta.' This name was recorded in Italian inventories of the sixteenth century leading to speculation that he worked in that country. Van Mander described his birthplace as Dinant but mentioned that his paintings were in great demand in Italy and Guarini claimed that he worked and lived in Ferrara. Guicciardini, however, associated Bles with Bouvignes and in 1541-2 a Henri Patenir is recorded as having paid tax on his garden in that city. Met de Bles' oeuvre of over 100 paintings is one of the largest in the sixteenth century, suggesting (as does the range of quality in his works) that he had a sizeable studio. The most concrete evidence on the artist has emerged recently from the dendrochronological studies of various panels in the exhibition at the Musie des Arts anciens du Namurois in 2000. While this small sampling did not help to place his works geographically, it dated a number of them to the 1530s and 1540s.
Provenance: with Pieter de Boer, Amsterdam, 1930. with K. Hermsen, New York/The Hague. with D. Hermsen, The Hague. with Jacques Goudstikker, Amsterdam, by 1931. Looted by the Nazi authorities, July 1940. Recovered by the Allies, 1945. in the custody of the Dutch Government. Restituted in February 2006 to the heir of Jacques Goudstikker.
Exhibited: Kunst uit de 16e-17e eeuw. Hasselt (ed.). Provinciaal Begjinhof. 13-27 November 1955, no. 3, illustrated. Leiden, Stedelijk Museum de Lakenhal, Tussen fantasie en werkelijkheid, 20 March-20 June 1992, pp. 68 and 133, no. 1, illustrated. Maastricht, Bonnefantenmuseum, on loan.
Literature: Exhibition catalogue, Catalogus van Schilderijen en Beeldhouwwerken, Maastricht, Limburgs Museum Bisdom Roermond, 1958, pp. 14-5, illustrated.
Herri Met De Bles - The Descent Into Limbo

Herri Met De Bles - The Descent Into Limbo

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Lot number: 20
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Herri met de Bles, il Civetta (b. Bouvines c. 1510) The Descent into Limbo signed with the artist's device of an owl (centre right) oil on panel 8 3/8 x 13¼ in. (21.3 x 33.7 cm.) THE PROPERTY OF A LADY (lots 19-21) Provenance with Julius Bohler, Munich, 1966. Lot Notes The basic composition is known in five versions: the presentwork; that in a private collection (recorded in the files of theRKD, no. 59982); that sold in these Rooms, 9 December 1988, lot 59,as Follower of Jan Mandijn (formerly attributed in 1962 by Dr.Walther Bernt to Gillis Mostaert); that sold in these Rooms, 23July 1982, lot 35, as Attributed to Jan Mandyn; and another sold inthese Rooms, 5 February 1988, lot 135, as Follower of HieronymusBosch. Judging from photographs, the first two paintings wouldappear to be of noticeably higher quality than the latterthree. There are differences between all five pictures. The mostimportant, however, are all between the present work and all fourothers: this is the only example to include a sunlit depiction ofPurgatory (or The Last Judgement?) in the background, to omit thescenes of a soul being forced to sign a document in the lower right(beneath the monstrous head) and of tortured souls by an infernallake in the foreground. Given the singular nature of the presentwork, it would seem reasonable to hypothesize that the latter threeworks are contemporary copies of the second picture, whilst thepresent example is by a separate artist. On that basis, it is particularly interesting to note the inclusionin this picture alone of the owl in the tree, upper right. Althoughthe depiction of an owl has often been cited as the equivalent of asignature for Herri met de Bles, and was cited as such by VanMander, it has long been recognised that this cannot always berelied upon. Instead, as suggested by Friedländer, it should beused by way of confirmation rather than original proof (EarlyNetherlandish Painting, XIII, Leiden and Brussels, 1975, p. 24).That the present work differs from all other versions, thatstylistically the unique background landscape is so close to Herrimet de Bles, and that it is furthermore the only version to includethe owl indicates that the symbol's inclusion here can be taken assuch a confirmation.
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