Cookies help Arcadja providing its services: browsing the portal you accept their use.
I cookies aiutano Arcadja a fornire i suoi servizi: navigando nel portale ne accettate l'utilizzo.
Cookies disclosure/Informativa cookies

  • Art Auctions, Ventes aux Encheres Art, Kunstauctionen, Subastas Arte, Leilões de Arte, Аукционы искусства, Aste
  • Research
  • Services
  • Enrollment
    • Enrollment
  • Arcadja
  • Search author
  • Login

Juan Domingo Davila

(1946 )
DAVILA Juan Domingo Portrait Of Enriqueta Gallardo

Menzies Art Brands
Mar 20, 2014
Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of Juan Domingo Davila at auctions worldwide.
Go to the complete price list of works Follow the artist with our email alert
Artworks in Arcadja
12

Some works of Juan Domingo Davila

Extracted between 12 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Juan Domingo Davila - Nothing

Juan Domingo Davila - Nothing

Original 1987
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 22
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
JUAN DAVILA , born 1946, Chilean/Australian, NOTHING, 1987 , oil on canvas, fourteen panels SIGNED: signed, dated and inscribed with title verso: "NOTHING" / JUAN DAVILA 1987 DIMENSIONS: 241.0 x 251.0 cm PROVENANCE: Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne Holmes à Court Collection, Perth Company collection, Sydney Deutscher~Menzies, Sydney, 10 March 2003, lot 12 Gene and Brian Sherman collection, Sydney EXHIBITED: The Australian Bicentennial Perspecta, Art Gallery New South Wales, Sydney, 14 October - 29 November 1987; Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, 5 - 17 April 1988; Wurttembergische Kurstverein, Stuttgart, Germany, March - April 1989 Juan Davila, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, 9 September - 12 November 2006; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 30 November 2006 - 4 February 2007 LITERATURE: Brett, G., and Benjamin, R., Juan Davila, The Miegunyah Press, Melbourne in association with Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, 2006, pl. 35, pp. 54, 112 (illus.), 253 ESSAY: Juan Davila lives and works in Melbourne SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 2015 Green Room. Juan Davila, Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane 2013 Melbourne Now, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 2007 Andy and Oz: Parallel Visions, The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, USA 2007 Documenta 12, Kassel, Germany 2006 Juan Davila Retrospective, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne and Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney 2002 Juan Davila: Works 1988 - 2002, Australian National University Drill Hall Gallery, Canberra 2002 Fieldwork, Australian Art 1968 - 2002, National Gallery of Victoria SELECTED LITERATURE Briggs, K., Juan Davila : the moral meaning of wilderness, ANU Drill Hall Gallery, Canberra, 2010 Brett, G., and Benjamin, R., Juan Davila, The Miegunyah Press, Melbourne in association with Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, 2006 Juan Davila : works 1988-2002, ANU Drill Hall Gallery, Canberra, 2002 SELECTED COLLECTIONS Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth National Gallery of Australia, Canberra National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Heide Museum of Modern Art, Victoria Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA Museo Extremeño e Iberoamericano de Arte Contemporáneo, Spain Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane REPRESENTED BY Kalli Rolfe Contemporary Art, Melbourne
Juan Domingo Davila - Monogram

Juan Domingo Davila - Monogram

Original 1989
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Lot number: 68
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
JUAN DAVILA, born 1946, MONOGRAM, 1989, oil and collage on canvas
(117 views)

Juan Davila (1946)

Starting bid:

AUD70,000
(0 bids)

Your max bid:

The Invaluable Live! SecureBid™ feature ensures you never overpay. Without disclosing your limit to anyone, SecureBid™ places your bids automatically, up to one increment higher than the last in-room bid or preset reserve, until we have reached your maximum bid.
Close

Leave Bid

(Enter more than AUD70,000)

Watch this lot
(1 watching)

Watch this lot and you\\’\\’\\’\\’ll receive a reminder email a day before the auction starts.

Add to calendar

View bid increments

Bid Increments Table

From:

To:

Increment:

AUD0

AUD999

AUD50

AUD1,000

AUD1,999

AUD100

AUD2,000

AUD3,199

AUD200

AUD3,200

AUD3,799

AUD300

AUD3,800

AUD4,199

AUD200

AUD4,200

AUD4,799

AUD300

AUD4,800

AUD4,999

AUD200

AUD5,000

AUD9,999

AUD500

AUD10,000

AUD19,999

AUD1,000

AUD20,000

AUD31,999

AUD2,000

AUD32,000

AUD37,999

AUD3,000

AUD38,000

AUD41,999

AUD2,000

AUD42,000

AUD47,999

AUD3,000

AUD48,000

AUD49,999

AUD2,000

AUD50,000

AUD99,999

AUD5,000

AUD100,000

AUD199,999

AUD10,000

AUD200,000

AUD319,999

AUD20,000

AUD320,000

AUD379,999

AUD30,000

AUD380,000

AUD419,999

AUD20,000

AUD420,000

AUD479,999

AUD30,000

AUD480,000

AUD499,999

AUD20,000

AUD500,000

AUD999,999

AUD50,000

AUD1,000,000+

AUD100,000

Request info

Register to bid

Description:

JUAN DAVILA, born 1946, MONOGRAM, 1989, oil and collage on canvas
SIGNED:

signed, dated and inscribed verso: ‘MONOGRAM’ - JUAN DAVILA 1989
DIMENSIONS:

280.0 - 280.0 cm
LITERATURE:

Brett, B. and Benjamin, R., Juan Davila, The Miegunyah Press, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, 2006, p. 132 (illus.)
PROVENANCE:

Kalli Rolfe Contemporary Art, Melbourne

Private collection, Melbourne

Juan Davila, Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne, 1989

Juan Davila, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, - September - 12 November 2006; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 30 November 2006 - 4 February 2007
ESSAY
\\‘We seem to have lost the capacity to relate to any other culture or being but the Western one…. Social issues, disturbance, difference, misery, madness and strangeness are silenced by emphasising in the other only that which resembles us, or by distancing the other and its desire as alien, thus erasing the capacity of anyone to address or challenge us…\\’\\’\\’\\’1
With his unswerving belief in the role of the artist as \\‘provocateur\\’\\’\\’\\’, for over four decades now Chilean-born artist, Juan Davila has consistently interrogated prevailing cultural, social and sexual identities to create an art that is as uncomfortable at times as it is compelling. Whether critiquing the Australian political system, the greed of late-capitalism, the oppression exerted by Western art history or the treatment of marginalised people in both Chile and Australia, his work is strident and confrontational, yet strangely seductive and always unforgettable – bestowing a lingering sense of disquiet and inevitably disturbing our world view.
Throughout his rich and varied oeuvre, one of Davila\\’\\’\\’\\’s signature techniques has been his \\‘cultural quotation style\\’\\’\\’\\’ which juxtaposes allusions and references to other artists alongside the visual landscape of the street (comic strips, tarot cards, pornography, political cartoons etc). While this challenge to the \\‘high-low\\’\\’\\’\\’ divide is reminiscent of the Western avant-garde as espoused by Dada and Pop Art, importantly the strategy also evokes the hybrid modernism of his native Latin America which typically incorporates indigenous, colonial and external influences. Betraying contradictory qualities of refinement and tackiness, mimicry and invention, celebration and condemnation, Monogram, 1989 encapsulates the fragmentary implications of this \\‘collage\\’\\’\\’\\’ approach, invariably employed by the artist to promote uncomfortable ambiguity and create subtle shifts in perception.
Overwhelming both in their scale and myriad cast of art world identities, Davila\\’\\’\\’\\’s elaborate tableaux from 1989 (including Retablo, Hybrid and The Barricade) are undeniably considered among the most powerful of his career – and certainly, Monogram is no exception. A direct parody of the \\‘combine\\’\\’\\’\\’ painting of the same name by Robert Rauschenberg in which the American artist juxtaposes the taxidermied head of a goat (here Davila employs a kangaroo instead), indeed Monogram illustrates well Davila\\’\\’\\’\\’s use of mimicry as a strategy of reinvention through the recombination of cultural forms. In the same vein for example, Davila comically conflates Brack\\’\\’\\’\\’s signature ballroom dancers with his feted portrait of Fred Williams in the collection of the Art Gallery of South Australia; performance artist Mike Parr appears with his head anamorphically distorted; and fellow South-American social realist, Antonio Berni, is referenced in the figure of Juanita Laguna (a fictional character from his collaged narratives condemning the poverty engendered by neocolonialism in Argentina) – to list but a few of the many allusions to the \\‘art economy\\’\\’\\’\\’ incorporated by Davila as ciphers to be decoded. Moreover, the dismantling of pictorial unity that occurs through the collision of so-called \\‘high art\\’\\’\\’\\’ with mundane imagery here (Australian memorabilia from literature and advertising, kitchen linen reproductions etc) not only forces the viewer to question the hierarchies applied to images, but serves to undermine the power historically accorded to the artist as the originator of art\\’\\’\\’\\’s fixed meanings, and ultimately, to de-stabilise the Western tradition as the dominant cultural narrative.
Highly respected for his resonant social voice, Davila has exhibited widely throughout Australia, South America, North America and Europe since the 1970s. His work was included in the 1982 and 1984 Biennales of Sydney and the 1998 Bienal de São Paulo, Brazil, and featured prominently in Documenta 12, Kassel, Germany, in 2007. In 2006, a major retrospective exhibition was held at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney and National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, while other notable recent achievements include The Moral Meaning of Wilderness, Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne, 2011 and the non-acquisitive Benalla Nude Art Prize which he was awarded in 2014. Today his work is held in all major public collections throughout Australia, as well as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and Museo Extremeno e Iberoamericano de Arte Contemporaneo, Madrid.
1. Davila, J., \\‘A Brief Commentary by the Artist\\’\\’\\’\\’ in Juan Davila: Works 1988-2002, The Australian National University Drill Hall Gallery, Canberra, 26 September – 3 November 2002, p. 13
VERONICA ANGELATOS
Juan Domingo Davila - Carmen Gallardo

Juan Domingo Davila - Carmen Gallardo

Original 2005
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Net Price
Lot number: 115
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Description:

Carmen Gallardo

gouache and synthetic polymer paint on paper and perspex

signed and dated lower right: Juan Davila 2005

signed and dated lower right: Juan Davila 2005
(c) Juan Davila. Licensed by Kalli Rolfe Contemporary Art
Kalli Rolfe Contemporary, Melbourne|Private collection, Melbourne
85.0 x 126.0 cm
JUAN DAVILA
gouache and synthetic polymer paint on paper and perspex
2005
Juan Domingo Davila - Portrait Of Enriqueta Gallardo

Juan Domingo Davila - Portrait Of Enriqueta Gallardo

Original 1999
Estimate:

Price:

Net Price
Lot number: 32
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
JUAN DAVILA
born 1946
Portrait of Enriqueta Gallardo (Buckley's Return) 1999 oil, gold leaf and mixed media on canvas laid on board 238.0 x 300.5 cm (framed) signed and dated lower left: J Davila 1999 signed, dated and inscribed verso: "PORTRAIT OF ENRIQUETA GALLARDO"/ JUAN DAViLA 1999/ JUAN DAViLA 1999
Provenance: Greenaway Art Gallery, Adelaide, 2000 Private collection, Adelaide
Exhibited: Juan Davila, Greenaway Art Gallery, Adelaide, February - March 2000
Reference: Walker, W., 'Brushed-up issues', The Advertiser, Adelaide, 21 February 2000, p.28 (illus.)
Portrait of Enriqueta Gallardo (Buckley\’\’s Return) 1999 is one of a seminal group of six large-scale paintings first exhibited at Greenaway Art Gallery, Adelaide, in 2000. The works, all of which satirized then-Prime Minister John Howard, made some powerful statements surrounding the Howard Government\‘s policies. Paying particular attention to his perceived view of the government\’\’ s antiquated treatment of aboriginal people, along with its tough stance on immigration - notably the treatment of immigrants at the Woomera detention centers in South Australia – Davila\’\’s paintings of the period demonstrate an enduring poignancy some fifteen years on.
Chilean-born Davila was a key exponent of Australian Postmodernism along with Imants Tillers, Gordon Bennett and Tim Johnson. Perhaps the most significant movement in contemporary art since the eighties, it developed a new visual language with a focus on the Postmodernist concepts of the death of the author and the world as a global village. Appropriating images, styles and motifs from other artists as well as high culture and the every-day, the Postmodernists de-contextualized pre-existing imagery in order to redefine their own perspectives:
'...Davila's primary artistic method was appropriation: he borrowed images from high art, the mass media, science fiction, homosexual pornography and the cultures of Latin America. His painting was virulent because he copied his models with violent intent, corrupting their original meanings. Davila's works were linked to modernism because this idea of copying - as the means of possessing and altering an original so that it could never be seen in the same way again - was common amongst modernist artists such as Picasso in the early 20th century. Both Davila and Tillers were highly conscious of their positions at the margins of world art. Whereas Tillers' politics remained grounded in the discourse of art, Davila's paintings were edged with a hostility and anger produced by the radical politics of his Chilean origins and coloured by his representation of homosexual desire'.1
Portrait of Enriqueta Gallardo (Buckley\’\’s Return) 1999 is a valuable and insightful example of Davila\’\’s Postmodernism, offering a visual amalgamation of multiple and complex historical, political and social references. Here, all fingers point to John Howard with his pants down, the remnants of a scratched out \‘sorry\’\’ hang in the air. A figure behind bars is scribbled out, their identity concealed. The pseudo plaque\’\’s inscription \‘Buckley\’\’s Return\’\’ refers to William Buckley, a convict who lived for thirty-two years amongst the Aborigines in the early nineteenth century. Considered by some as \‘the hero of the wild\’\’, he subsequently worked as a government guide and conciliator between white and indigenous Australians. The portrait of Enriqueta Gallardo, standing tall with handbag and spear, is multitudinous in its origins and meaning. Obvious references include Latin American culture, Russell Drysdale\’\’ s Drover\’\’s Wife, Arthur Boyd\’\’s \‘half-caste bride\’\’ and notions of multiculturalism and transgenderism. Davila clearly demonstrates that identity, gender and history are not fixed or constant, rather are in a constant state of change.
Davila is a passionate advocate of the need for art to debate and his paintings often test our tolerance for the absurd and the profane, pushing us to question our moral bearings on civil and political issues. It is perhaps for this reason that Davila's Hysterical Tears series of paintings from the early 1980s; The Fable of Australian Painting, 1983 (Collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney) and Stupid as a Painter (Collection of Kerry Stokes, Perth), are just some examples of works that have become icons of Australian art.
Footnotes
1 Green, C., Peripheral Vision - Contemporary Australian Art 1970-1994, Sydney, 1995, p. 73
Tracy Le Cornu BA
Juan Domingo Davila -  Untitled

Juan Domingo Davila - Untitled

Original 1994
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Lot number: 94
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Untitled (Conquistador) 1994 JUAN DAVILA born 1946, Untitled (Conquistador) 1994 oil on canvas on board, 69.5 x 49.5 cm signed and dated lower right: Davila 94. signed and dated verso: JUAN DAVILA 1994. , , Kalli Rolfe Contemporary Art, Melbourne Private collection, Sydney
Arcadja LogoServices
Subscription
Advertising
Sponsored Auctions
Subscription

Arcadja
Our Product
Follow Arcadja on Facebook
Follow Arcadja on Twitter
Follow Arcadja on Google+
Follow Arcadja on Pinterest
Follow Arcadja on Tumblr