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Jacopo Carucci Da Pontormo

(1494 -  1556 ) Wikipedia® : Jacopo Carucci Da Pontormo
da PONTORMO Jacopo Carucci Saint Francis; The Penitent Saint Jerome

Sotheby's
Jan 27, 2011
Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of Jacopo Carucci Da Pontormo at auctions worldwide.
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Variants on Artist's name :

Carrucci Jacopo Pontormo

 

Artworks in Arcadja
59

Some works of Jacopo Carucci Da Pontormo

Extracted between 59 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Jacopo Carucci Da Pontormo - Featuring Portrait Of A Man

Jacopo Carucci Da Pontormo - Featuring Portrait Of A Man

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Lot number: 66
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Lot 66: JACOPO DA PONTORM Italian 1494-1557 Pastel Portrai Description: Pastel on paper. Featuring portrait of a man. Signed and attr. Jacopo da Pontorm (Italian, 1494-1557). 12 x 8.75 in. (30.5 x 22.2 cm). Pontormo, was an Italian Mannerist painter and portraitist from the Florentine School. His work represents a profound stylistic shift from the calm perspectival regularity that characterized the art of the Florentine Renaissance. He is famous for his use of twining poses, coupled with ambiguous perspective; his figures often seem to float in an uncertain environment, unhampered by the forces of gravity. PROVENANCE: Private estate (Perugia, Italy)
Jacopo Carucci Da Pontormo - Marcus Curtius Leaping Into The Abyss

Jacopo Carucci Da Pontormo - Marcus Curtius Leaping Into The Abyss

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Lot number: 75
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Description:
Jacopo Carucci, called Pontormo

PONTORMO NEAR EMPOLI 1494 - 1556 FLORENCE

MARCUS CURTIUS LEAPING INTO THE ABYSS

oil on panel

21 7/8 by 44 7/8 in.; 55.6 by 114 cm.

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Saleroom Notice

Provenance

Prof. Dr. Friedrich Wilhelm, Freiherr von Bissing, 1911;

Anonymous sale, Munich, Helbing, February 16-17, 1928, lot 355 (as Beccafumi);

Anonymous sale ("The Property of a Gentleman"), London, Sotheby's, July 10, 1974, lot 25 (as Pontormo);

Anonymous sale ("The Property of a Swiss Collector"), London, Sotheby's, July 6 1983, lot 33 (as Pontormo).

Exhibited

Florence, Palazzo Strozzi, Pontormo and Rosso Fiorentino, Diverging paths of Mannerism, 8 March - 20 July 2014, no. I.2.7 (as Pontormo).

Literature

H. Nasse, "Gemälde aus der Sammlung des Univ. Prof. Dr. Freih. v. Bissing," in Münchner Jahrbuch, 1911, p. 328;

P. Costamagna, Pontormo, Milan 1994, under rejected attributions, p. 303, cat. no. A71 (as probably by a student of Andrea del Sarto);

C. Falciani, "Spigolature sul Bronzino (e sul Pontormo)", in Paragone, 111, 2013, pp. 35-36, reproduced plate 32 (as Pontormo);

C. Falciani and A. Natali, Pontormo and Rosso Fiorentino, Diverging Paths of Mannerism, Florence 2014, p. 52-53, cat. no. I.2.7., reproduced p. 53 (as Pontormo).

Though known in earlier literature, it was in 2012 that Andrea De Marchi recognized the quality of this charming panel and tentatively suggested it to be a youthful work by Pontormo.

1

Carlo Falciani later upheld the attribution, and published the painting in 2013, dating it between 1513 and 1515 (see Literature). The painting was subsequently included in the exhibition, Pontormo and Rosso Fiorentino, Diverging Paths of Mannerism, held in Florence in the spring of last year, (see Literature and Exhibited). Falciani notes that the swift brushwork and seemingly hasty formulation of the panel medium, with its thinly applied layer gesso, is entirely in keeping with rushed preparations for an \“ephemeral occasion\” such as a Carnevale.

2

Ordered by the Medici, these celebratory pageants were grand affairs with processions of elaborately decorated floats and sumptuous costumes.

The young Pontormo, was involved in the decoration of floats for the Carnevale of 1513, held in Florence and his paintings were based on designs by Andrea del Sarto. Most compelling in terms of the attribution is the beautiful preparatory drawing revealed in infrared reflectograms beneath the paint surface which are indisputably by Pontormo's own hand (fig. 1). The fluid, confident designs are entirely typical of the artist, with billowing outlines to the limbs and broad, rounded thighs. As Falciani indicates, this graphic style is comparable with two sheets by Pontormo, one in a French private collection and the other in the Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence (inv. no. GDSU. 662 F verso).
3
The two drawing were preparations for the artist's fresco in the Basilica della Santissima Annunziata, Florence, which dates between 1513 and 1515, contemporaneous with the present painting.
4

In the Carnevale of 1513, five of the seven floats in the procession were dedicated to prominent figures of Ancient Rome.
5
These Roman themes were aptly suited to celebrations held by the Medici, promoting the paradigm of moral heroism, military boldness and a patriotic loyalty to the Republic.
6
This valiantly selfless paradigm is epitomized in the story of Marcus Curtius. According to Livy\’\’s History of Rome, an earthquake of great seismic force had opened an immeasurable crevasse in the ground at the Forum at Rome. Unable to fill its incalculable depth, the citizens of Rome sought the counsel of soothsayers who declared they must sacrifice to the abyss the greatest treasure of the Roman People:

\“Thereupon Marcus Curtius, a young soldier of great prowess, rebuked them, so the story runs, for questioning whether any blessing were more Roman than arms and valor. A hush ensued as he turned to the temples of the immortal gods which rise above the Forum, and to the Capitol, and stretching forth his hands, now to heaven, now to the yawning chasm and to the gods below, he devoted himself to death. After which, mounted on a horse caparisoned with all possible splendor, he plunged fully armed into the gulf.\”
7

1. Oral communication upon firsthand inspection. 2. C. Falciani, 2014, under Literature. 3. J. Cox-Rearick, "Aggiunte al 'corpus' dei disegni del Pontormo: 1981-1994", in R.P. Ciardi and A. Natali, Pontormo e Rosso: atti del convegno di Empoli e Volterra progetto Appiani di Piombino, Florence 1996, p. 65, reproduced figs. 1-2. 4. C. Falciani, 2014, op. cit. 5. Ibid. 6. Ibid. 7. Livy, History of Rome, VII:6, B.O. Foster ed., vol. III, Cambridge Mass. 1924, p. 375.

Fig. 1
Fig. 2
Jacopo Carucci Da Pontormo - Portrait Of Cosimo I De' Medici (1519-74), Half-length, In A Black Slashed Doublet And A Plumed Hat, Holding A Book

Jacopo Carucci Da Pontormo - Portrait Of Cosimo I De' Medici (1519-74), Half-length, In A Black Slashed Doublet And A Plumed Hat, Holding A Book

Original
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Lot number: 166
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Description:
Jacopo Carucci, called Jacopo Pontormo (Pontormo, near Empoli 1494-1556 Florence)

Portrait of Cosimo I de' Medici (1519-74), half-length, in a black slashed doublet and a plumed hat, holding a book

oil (or oil and tempera) on panel

39½ x 30¼ in. (100.6 x 77 cm.)
Riccardo Romolo Riccardi (1558-1612), before 1612, Florence, and thence by descent until at least 1814. Charles T.D. Crews, London; (+), Christie's, London, 2 July 1915, lot 144, as Bronzino, where acquired by the following. with Pawsey & Payne, London. Sir Thomas Merton, Winforton House, Hereford (according to Witt Library Mount). with F.A. Drey, London. Lord Burton, England. with Wildenstein & Co., New York, by 1952, from whom acquired in 1980 by the present owner.
THE AGE OF VASARI The Age of Vasari is a useful if broad catch phrase for the period in Italian art from c. 1520-1580, when the so called Mannerist style, as developed in Florence and Rome in painting, sculpture, and architecture, was diffused throughout Italy and all Europe. Vasari, born in Arezzo in Tuscany, was himself a leading Mannerist painter, but is best known for his great biographical work, the Lives of the Artists, in which he chronicles the careers of Italian masters past and present in unprecedented depth, anticipating modern art history. According to Vasari, the arts in Italy had evolved to perfection in the work of Michelangelo, and the High Renaissance of the early Cinquecento, dominated by Raphael and Leonardo as well as Michelangelo, still seems from today's perspective to have achieved exemplary harmony in an Italy otherwise beset by political strife and foreign incursions. Indeed Raphael's fresco of The School of Athens in the Vatican (1509-1510; fig. 1), though the philosophers are Greek, evokes in monumental form the stability of a long-vanished Roman imperium that had lasted well over a millennium. But just as the Roman Empire was undermined by internal disruption, so the High Renaissance point of balance was not destined to last. Indeed the seeds of change were already present in one of its greatest achievements, the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel (fig. 2). Here the energetic and complex body language and the bright aggressive color contrasts adumbrate the more restless style of the next generation where sophisticated artifice and virtuosity were prized over naturalism, and abstruse compositions and subject matter were preferred to narrative clarity. In Rome, all the arts were dominated by the juggernaut figure of Michelangelo. To imitate him was not condemned as uncreative eclecticism but honored as appropriate homage to an unsurpassable exemplar. In Michelangelo's Last Judgment, completed in 1541, the whole company, both damned and elect, seem weighed down by the gross physicality of the human condition. We live in a world of sin and can only be saved by divine fiat. The helplessness of man in the face of the Almighty is a somewhat Protestant concept from a Roman point of view, so the Last Judgment, also criticized for indecorous nudity, excited unease as well as reverence and awe. In Florence, the other principle fount of the Mannerist style, Michelangelo's unsettling influence was also pervasive and in a masterpiece of the first generation of Florentine Mannerism, Pontormo's Deposition (fig. 3) of 1528, the Christ immediately recalls Michelangelo's canonical sculpture of the Pietà in Saint Peter's. The balletic grace of the figures, the pale surreal colors and the trance-like but very dead Christ with leaden eyelids and lips, conjure up a dreamlike atmosphere from which the anthropo-centric certainties of Renaissance humanism have been banished in favor of something approaching the transcendental Christianity of Byzantium and Hagia Sofia. In the Deposition by Rosso (fig. 4), the other great master of this generation of Mannerism in Florence, there is by contrast something devilish and infernal in the vicious angular poses, the razor-sharp draperies, and the aggressive Michelangelesque colors which evoke the dismal agony of earthly grief rather than the otherworldly promise of redemption in the Pontormo. In the group of paintings on offer, the influence of Rosso is clearly apparent in the confrontational and angular Madonna and Child by Carlo Portelli and that of Pontormo in the balletic grace of Mirabello Cavalori's Entombment. In the latter, form dominates content in a typical display of Mannerist complexity, and the subject matter is swamped by the graceful drift of the figures. The same sort of effect can be seen in a fresco by Bronzino, Pontormo's pupil, of the Martyrdom of St. Lawrence (fig. 5) in the eponymous church in Florence where the saint on the grill is overwhelmed by the other figures in a riot of athletic visual gymnastics. At the height of the age of Vasari, in the mid-16th century, Rome was fully theocratic under a papacy enriched by tribute from all over Europe and the New World. In Florence, the rule of the Medici was less oligarchic than in times past and firmly autocratic under the Grand Duke Cosimo, who came to power in 1537. The Medici had risen to prominence through the wool trade and banking, and gilded the lily by magnificent patronage of the arts. They had their ups and downs, including periods of exile, but by the end of the 16th century, were secure in the European political pantheon, furnishing four popes and two Queens of France. The court of Cosimo was conspicuously splendid but he could never have survived without the backing of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor and predominant power in Italy. His glittering court will be forever identified with the cold elegance of Bronzino's portraits, which are raised to greatness by a hint of the tensions burgeoning beneath the polished carapace of 16th-century high life. Bronzino rated as a portrait specialist but his master Pontormo painted portraits on a more occasional basis. His portrait of Cosimo shortly after his accession forms a remarkable contrast with his Getty Halberdier (fig. 6), thought by some to represent an idealized, adolescent Cosimo, rigged out in the smartest para-military gear, romantically defending his native city. The work here on offer shows him in sober civilian guise but with a sense of mastery appropriate to his aristocratic role and the claims of the Medici to primacy. As with Velasquez's early portraits of Spanish royalty, he has no need of showy costume to demonstrate his authority. Few people would rate Vasari himself on the same level as Pontormo, Rosso, or Bronzino, and he never painted anything so attractive as the luscious tapestry-like fresco decorations by his friend Francesco Salviati. As an architect he is more original, and his Uffizi, designed as government offices, anticipates the 20th-century office block in its dry, modular style. However, as the Pietà in the present group shows, he is often a more expressive artist than his somewhat academic reputation suggests. Vasari was a highly influential artistic impresario and in 1570-1572 he helped design a key Mannerist project, the studiolo of Francesco dei Medici (Cosimo's successor) in the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence. This cycle of small paintings, inspired by Francesco's collections of minerals and curiosities, is the epitome of Mannerist elitism in its ultra-sophisticated refinement and abstruse pseudo-scientific subject matter. Unfortunately, for the Council of Trent, established in 1545 to reform the church in the face of the Protestant challenge, the studiolo set a bad example. An art of greater clarity was called for, especially in religious paintings, where the message and stories of the scripture could be more accessible to the layman. Inevitably the Tridentine mandate achieved mixed results. Religious art became easier to read but much of it was pedantic and formulaic. The chief culprit here was Federico Zuccaro, the doyen of late Mannerism in Italy. Zuccaro redeemed himself by his brilliance as a draftsman but it remains a mystery why he and his followers failed to translate the incisive virtuosity of their drawings into the more formal medium of painting and fresco. A more successful response to Tridentine ideals is represented in the present group by Alessandro Allori's Noli me tangere. Allori was Bronzino's adopted nephew but here he has outgrown his Mannerist origins in favor of a much more realistic style, which is easier to read. Typical of this new emphasis is the costume of the Magdalen, which is not generalized like Christ's but based on contemporary fashion. On close inspection, Christ's right arm is unusually long and his hands, like the Magdalen's, exceptionally large. This adroit exaggeration, in an age where rhetoric still mattered, gives gesture a leading role in a way that was soon to be spectacularly exploited by Caravaggio in his Supper at Emmaus in London (fig. 7). In this very fine late work, Allori has embraced the realism of the early Baroque in a foretaste of 17th-century Baroque classicism. PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF BARBARA PIASECKA JOHNSON PROCEEDS TO BENEFIT THE BARBARA PIASECKA JOHNSON FOUNDATION
MS., Archivio di Stato, Florence, Carte Riccardi, fil. 258, n. 1. MS., Archivio di Stato, Florence, Carte Riccardi, fil. 278, c. 15. B. Berenson, I Pittori italiani del rinascimento, Milan 1948, p. 272, no. 133, reproduced. H. Keutner, "Zu einigen Bildnissen des frühen Florentiner Manierismus," Mitteilungen des Kunsthistorischen Instituts in Florenz, VIII, 1959, p. 152. G. Rosenthal, 'Bacchiacca and his friends. Comments on the exhibition', The Baltimore Museum of Art News, XXIV, no. 2, 1961, pp. 14-15, 58, no. 56. B. Berenson, Italian Pictures of the Renaissance. Florentine School, London, 1963, I, p. 181. K.W. Forster, 'Probleme um Pontormos Porträtmalerei (I)', Pantheon, XXII, 1964, p. 380, as by workshop of Bronzino, datable to c. 1540-41. L. Berti, Pontormo, Florence 1964, p. 101. R.B. Simon, Bronzino's Portraits of Cosimo I de' Medici, Ph.D., Columbia University, 1982, pp. 181-187, 343, as close to Pontormo. P. Costamagna and A. Fabre, Les portraits florentins du début du XVI siècle à l'avènement de Cosimo I: catalogue raisonné d'Albertinelli à Pontormo, II, Paris 1986, pp. 384-388, no. 98. J. Cox-Rearick, 'The Influence of Pontormo's Portrait', in Christie's sale catalogue, New York, 31 May 1989. L. Berti, 'L' Alabardiere del Pontormo, Critica d'Arte, LVI, 1990, p. 46, as workshop of Bronzino. P. Costamagna, Pontormo, Milan 1994, pp. 242-244, no. 79. A. Forlani Tempesti and A. Giovannetti, Pontormo, Florence, 1994, p. 142, no. 48, repeats earlier attributions. E. Cropper, L'Officina della Maniera, exhibition catalogue, Florence, Uffizi, 1996, p. 380, no. 142. E. Cropper, Pontormo. Portrait of a Halberdier, Los Angeles 1997, pp. 100-105, no. 52. A. Pinelli, La bellezza impure: Arte e politica nell'Italia del Rinascimento, Rome 2004, p. 129. F. Russell, 'A Portrait of a Young Man in Black by Pontormo', The Burlington Magazine, CL, October 2008, p. 676.
Burlington House, 1888. Houston, Allied Arts Association, Masterpieces of Painting through Six Centuries, 16-27 November 1952. Baltimore, Museum of Art, Bacchiacca and His Friends: Florentine Paintings and Drawings of the Sixteenth Century, 10 January-19 February, 1961, no. 56. Cleveland, The Cleveland Museum of Art, Style, Truth, and The Portrait, 1 October-10 November 1963, no. 2. Florence, Uffizi, L'officina della maniera, 18 September 1996-6 January 1997, no. 380.
Jacopo Carucci Da Pontormo - The Madonna And Child With The Infant Saint John The Baptist

Jacopo Carucci Da Pontormo - The Madonna And Child With The Infant Saint John The Baptist

Original
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Lot number: 24
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Description:
Jacopo Carucci, called Pontormo (Pontormo 1494-1556 Florence)
The Madonna and Child with the Infant Saint John the Baptist
oil on panel
29½ x 23½ in. (74.9 x 59.6 cm.)
Possibly the estate of Pontormo; inherited by Andrea d'Antonio Chiazzella and sold by him for 15 scudi to Alessandro Allori; bought Piero Salviati, Florence, circa 1556, for 35 scudi and kept in the Villa Baroncelli (now Poggio Imperiale); remained in the estate of Salviati where it is recorded in inventories of 1559 and 1564; thence entered the Medici collections; thence given in 1565 to Paolo Giordano Orsini on the occasion of his marriage to Cosimo I's daughter Isabella de' Medici.
Probably Hamilton Gibbs Wilde (1827-1884).
Private collection, Boston (until 1991).
Mark Borghi collection, New York.
with Whitfield Fine Art, London (Old Masters in a Modern Light, 2009, pp. 20-29).
Private collection, USA.
THE PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN
G. Vasari, Le Vite de' più eccellenti pittori, scultori et architettori, 1568, VI, p. 288 (see note).
P. Costamagna, Pontormo, Milan, 1994, pp. 20-21, 266-267, 326.
E. Cropper, in L'officina della maniera, Florence, 1996, pp. 20, 288-289.
A. Forlani Tempesti, exhibition review in Antichità viva, XXXV, no. 4, 1996, p. 62.
J. Cox-Rearick, review of 'Pontormo' in The Burlington Magazine, CXXXIX, no. 1127, February 1997, p. 127.
E. Pilliod, Pontormo Bronzino Allori, New Haven, 2001, p. 259.
J. Cox-Rearick and P. Costamagna, 'A Bronzino discovery', Apollo, CLIX, no. 506, April 2004, p. 16.
Boston, Boston Art Club Exhibition, April 1879 (lent by Hamilton Wilde).
Florence, Gallerie degli Uffizi, L'officina della maniera. Varietà e fierezza nell'arte pubblica fiorentina del Cinquecento fra le due repubbliche 1494-1530, 1996-1997, pp. 288-289, no. 100.
Thought to be lost, this Madonna resurfaced in 1994 in a private collection in Boston, where it was discovered by Janet Cox-Rearick and attributed to Pontormo. It was then identified by Philippe Costamagna as the painting found in Pontormo's studio after his death (1556) and described by Vasari in his Life: 'After his death there were found in his house many drawings, cartoons, and models in clay, all very beautiful, and a painting of Our Lady executed by him excellently well as far as we can see, to all appearances done many years before' ('Furono dopo la costui morte trovati in casa sua molti disegni, cartoni, modelli di terra bellissimi; ed un quadro di Nostra Donna stato da lui molto ben condotto, per quello che si vide, e con bella maniera, molti anni innanzi; G. Vasari, loc. cit.). While this statement concerning a painting of 'Our Lady', is not an unmistakable reference to the present, more complex composition of a Madonna with the Infant Child and St John the Baptist, Vasari's description is, nevertheless, of a picture of Pontormo's early years ('molti anni innanzi'), which can be said of the present work; Costamagna dates it around 1513 (because of the 'shape of the eyes, and the hands and the way the bodies are drawn, all so typical of the artist'). A further strong argument corroborating the possible identification of the present work with the Madonna, described in the artist's studio by Vasari, is its condition. Despite some losses, some old restorations and some old repaint, notably in the dark background, the overall impression is that of an unfinished work; a state to which the biographer may have been referring with the words 'as far as we can see' ('per quello che si vide').

Accepting Costamagna's suggestion regarding its provenance, this Madonna was then inherited by Andrea d'Antonio Chiazzella, a weaver and relative of Pontormo, and sold by him to Alessandro Allori, 'son' of Bronzino, pupil of Pontormo. The picture was subsequently acquired by Piero Salviati, patron of Andrea del Sarto, in about 1556 for 35 scudi. It then remained in Florence for some time where it is listed in Salviati's inventory of 1599: 'in the south room a picture of Our Lady by the hand of Pontormo, as they say, with a green taffeta cover'. It reappeared in the twentieth century in a private collection in Massachusetts, described as having been in the collection of Hamilton Gibbs Wilde the previous century.

As an early work it can be compared to compositions of similar style dating to Pontormo's early years, such as the Saint Catherine in the Uffizi, Florence, or the Martyr Saint in the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Dijon. However, it is with the works of Andrea del Sarto, master, model and source of inspiration for the young artist in Florence, that this Madonna finds its best comparison. Costamagna compares it to Del Sarto's Charity in the Chiostro dello Scalzo, Florence, and to the small Madonna in the Galleria Borghese, Rome, which Antonio Natali suggests might even be by Pontormo rather than by Del Sarto.

Elisabeth Cropper, in the Florence exhibition catalogue L'officina della maniera, 1996-1997, relates the present picture to the large, imposing panel with The Holy Family with Saints (known as the Pucci Madonna) in the Florentine church of San Michele Visdomini, painted by Pontormo for the funerary chapel of Francesco di Giovanni di Antonio Pucci in 1518 (fig. 1). At this date Rosso and Pontormo had become the most prominent artists working in Florence, following the death of Fra Bartolomeo in October 1517 and the departure of Andrea del Sarto for France the following year. Not only does this panel share the same handling of the figures and the draperies, but the naked body of the Infant Child is also set in an almost identical posture with right leg bent, left one stretched, and with exactly the same twist of the head. Indeed so similar are the figures, that Pontormo's spectacular black chalk preparatory drawings for the head and figure of the Child in the Pucci altarpiece (figs. 2-4; Uffizi, Florence) might equally well have been used to prepare the figure of Christ and the head of Saint John the Baptist in this picture. The care and preparation Pontormo evidently took in executing the Pucci altarpiece, made clear by the wealth of associated preparatory studies, is echoed by the equally fastidious approach he took to the present Madonna. Despite its relatively small scale, indicating its function as a work of private devotion, it is every bit as carefully drawn as the larger panel, as can be seen in the underdrawing, executed with a thick brush and black oil paint, now visible to the naked eye through the upper layers of translucent paint. It stands as testimony to Pontormo's quest for artistic perfection as described by Vasari: 'He troubled his brain, which was a pity, destroying and redoing today what he had done yesterday'

A copy of this painting, formerly in the Florentine collection of Gino Capponi and now in the Villa of Varramista (Montopoli Valdarno) has been attributed by Costamagna to Pontormo's pupil Jacone (see Costamagna, Pontormo, Milan 1994, pp. 325-326, no. A 128).
Jacopo Carucci Da Pontormo - Saint Francis; The Penitent Saint Jerome

Jacopo Carucci Da Pontormo - Saint Francis; The Penitent Saint Jerome

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 127
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
LOT 127
JACOPO CARUCCI, CALLED PONTORMO
PONTORMO NEAR EMPOLI 1494 - 1556 FLORENCE
SAINT FRANCIS; THE PENITENT SAINT JEROME
a pair, both oil on panel
400,000—600,000 USD
the former: 11 1/4 by 4 3/4 in.; 28.5 by 12 cm. the latter: 11 3/8by 4 3/4 cm.; 29 by 12 cm.
Major George Frederick Myddleton Cornwallis-West (1874-1951);Anonymous sale, London, Christie's, 19 January 1954, lot 138 asBeccafumi where offered with two other panels representing aMadonna and Mary Magdalene , and a Saint John theEvangelist ;With Julius H. Weitzner, New York, by January 1955;Count Leonardo Vitetti (1895–1973), Rome, as Pontormo;Anonymous sale ('The Property of a Lady'), London, Sotheby's, 16May 1984, lot 60 as circle of Pontormo, for £3,500, where offeredwith the two aforementioned panels;With Piero Corsini, New York, by 1986, as School of RossoFiorentino;Private collection, New York.
Pennsylvania State University; Joseph and Margaret MuscarelleMuseum of Art, Williamsburg; Springfield Museum of Fine Art;Italian Renaissance Art. Selections from the Piero CorsiniGallery , 1987, cat. no. 13 (as School of Rosso Fiorentino);London, Whitfield Fine Art, Old Masters in a ModernLight , 22 June–17 July 2009 (as Pontormo);Monaco, Maison d'Art, Important Old Masters in a New Light ,2–18 September 2009 (as Pontormo).
B. Wollesen-Wisch, Italian Renaissance Art. Selectionsfrom the Piero Corsini Gallery , exh. cat., Florence 1986, pp.38-39 (as School of Rosso Fiorentino);P. Costamagna
Pontormo , Milan 1994, p. 38, p. 137under note no. 2, reproduced p. 134 (where published as attributedto Pontormo);J. Cox-Rearick, The Burlington Magazine , 139,no. 1127, February 1997, p. 127 (where listed as probably not byPontormo);Old Masters in a Modern Light, exh. cat., London, WhitfieldFine Art, 2009, pp. 30-33 (as Pontormo);Important Old Masters in a New Light , exh. cat., Monaco,Maison d'Art, 2009, pp. 28-31 (as Pontormo).
These two small panels are early works by the leading exponentof Florentine Mannerism, Jacopo Carucci, better known after hisnative town of Pontormo. In his 1994 monograph Dr PhilippeCostamagna (see Literature ) links the panels, which he datesto the years 1517-18, to Pontormo's celebrated and stylisticallygroundbreaking Pucci altarpiece in the church of San MicheleVisdomini in Florence, which is dated 1518. Considered by Vasari tobe Pontormo's masterpiece, the altarpiece broke with the classicismof the early years of the sixteenth century and marked a shift tothe more self-conscious and emotionally-charged style known asMannerism. The altarpiece was commissioned by Francesco di GiovanniPucci (1437-1518), gonfaloniere of the Florentine Republicand a fervent Medici supporter who dedicated the altarpiece to hisnamesake, Saint Francis. In a similar spirit, the names of theother saints in the composition relate to members of Francesco'sfamily: the figure of John the Evangelist is linked to Francesco'sfather Giovanni, while the figure of Saint James commemorates hisson Giacomo who had died in 1515.Costamagna, who since the publication of his monograph hasconfirmed a full attribution to Pontormo, points out that the rapidbrushwork of the panels is stylistically similar to some of thefigures of the artist's Stories of Joseph in the NationalGallery in London, commissioned in 1515 on the occasion of thewedding of Pierfrancesco Borgherini and Margherita Acciaiuoli.Certain features, particularly the modelling of the hands andbodies, and the wispy strands of Saint Jerome's beard reflectPontormo's experiments at the time with the description of smallfigures in large surroundings, particularly in the Joseph panels. Unsurprisingly, the panels also find affinity withpreparatory drawings for the Pucci altarpiece. Though reversed, thepose of the Saint Francis is
These two small panels are early works by the leading exponentof Florentine Mannerism, Jacopo Carucci, better known after hisnative town of Pontormo. In his 1994 monograph Dr PhilippeCostamagna (see Literature ) links the panels, which he datesto the years 1517-18, to Pontormo's celebrated and stylisticallygroundbreaking Pucci altarpiece in the church of San MicheleVisdomini in Florence, which is dated 1518. Considered by Vasari tobe Pontormo's masterpiece, the altarpiece broke with the classicismof the early years of the sixteenth century and marked a shift tothe more self-conscious and emotionally-charged style known asMannerism. The altarpiece was commissioned by Francesco di GiovanniPucci (1437-1518), gonfaloniere of the Florentine Republicand a fervent Medici supporter who dedicated the altarpiece to hisnamesake, Saint Francis. In a similar spirit, the names of theother saints in the composition relate to members of Francesco'sfamily: the figure of John the Evangelist is linked to Francesco'sfather Giovanni, while the figure of Saint James commemorates hisson Giacomo who had died in 1515.Costamagna, who since the publication of his monograph hasconfirmed a full attribution to Pontormo, points out that the rapidbrushwork of the panels is stylistically similar to some of thefigures of the artist's Stories of Joseph in the NationalGallery in London, commissioned in 1515 on the occasion of thewedding of Pierfrancesco Borgherini and Margherita Acciaiuoli.Certain features, particularly the modelling of the hands andbodies, and the wispy strands of Saint Jerome's beard reflectPontormo's experiments at the time with the description of smallfigures in large surroundings, particularly in the Joseph panels. Unsurprisingly, the panels also find affinity withpreparatory drawings for the Pucci altarpiece. Though reversed, thepose of the Saint Francis is closely linked to the figure in thealtarpiece, for which a drawing can be found in the J. Paul GettyMuseum (see fig. 1).As mentioned by Costamagna and as witnessed by the auctioncatalogues of 1954 and 1984 (see Provenance ), the two panelswere for the last century or so misattributed and framed with twoother small panels by another hand representing a Madonna andMagdalene , and a Saint John the Evangelist clearly takenfrom another altarpiece. Despite these incorrect attributions,Pontormo's name has been associated with the panels for some timenow: Costamagna mentions that photographs of the panels with thename of Pontormo inscribed in Berenson's hand on the verso can befound in the late scholar's archives in Villa I Tatti nearFlorence.
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