Cookies help Arcadja providing its services: browsing the portal you accept their use.
I cookies aiutano Arcadja a fornire i suoi servizi: navigando nel portale ne accettate l'utilizzo.
Cookies disclosure/Informativa cookies

  • Art Auctions, Ventes aux Encheres Art, Kunstauctionen, Subastas Arte, Leilões de Arte, Аукционы искусства, Aste
  • Research
  • Services
  • Enrollment
    • Enrollment
  • Arcadja
  • Search author
  • Login

John Coburn

Australia (1925 -  2006 ) Wikipedia® : John Coburn
COBURN John Tree Of Life Vi

Deutscher and Hackett
Apr 18, 2018
Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of John Coburn at auctions worldwide.
Go to the complete price list of works Follow the artist with our email alert
Along with John Coburn, our clients also searched for the following authors:
Donald Friend, Lloyd Frederic Rees, Arthur James Murch, Thomas Gleghorn, Hans Heysen, Brett Whiteley, Charles Blackman
Artworks in Arcadja
594

Some works of John Coburn

Extracted between 594 works in the catalog of Arcadja
John Coburn - Tree Of Life Vi

John Coburn - Tree Of Life Vi

Original 1975
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Lot number: 62
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Description: JOHN COBURN, (1925 – 2006), TREE OF LIFE VI, 1975, synthetic polymer paint on canvas SIGNED: signed lower right: Coburn signed, dated and inscribed with title verso: TREE OF LIFE VI / JOHN COBURN / SYDNEY 1975 DIMENSIONS: 152.0 x 152.5 cm PROVENANCE: John Marsden AM, Sydney Thence by descent Private collection, Sydney EXHIBITED: Central Mandala – The Private Collection of John Marsden, Campbelltown City Bicentennial Art Gallery, New South Wales, 15 March – 14 April 1996 On long-term loan to the Campbelltown Arts Centre, New South Wales from 2012 ESSAY: Throughout the 1970s the overarching theme of John Coburn\’s work was his religious faith. In fact given the colour and exuberance of his works from this period, they could be considered to be amongst his most vibrant and theatrical works. The paintings are often highlighted with gold or silver paint which imbues them with a precious quality and in some ways, endows the paintings with a sense of the holy. The works are often symmetric in composition, reflecting the art and architecture of Christian places of worship. As well as his faith, Coburn drew upon nature for his inspiration. Tree of Life, 1975, is a quintessential example of the artist\’s celebration of his beliefs, incorporating stylised ecumenical symbolism as the central subject of the work. Within this painting the artist merges two forces; the artist as creator and a higher force as the creator of all things. Alan Rozen sums this up simply, \‘He is constantly aware of the abstraction of a feeling for beauty and achieves his aims by a union of this feeling and beliefs in religion and nature. This then presents a twofold approach by Coburn to his work: first, he wants to produce something that is beautiful and pleasing to look at and, secondly, on a more profound level, he wants to relate his religion to nature, and nature to his religious beliefs.\’1 While abstract painting in Sydney from the mid-1970s on, had very much been a lyrical affair, Coburn\’s direct application of opaque paint and his personal repertoire of forms became the staple of the artist\’s mature style. His broad primordial forms, with their slabs of secondary colour, must have come as a cool antidote to the wristy arabesques of the likes of Passmore, Olsen, Johnson and Whiteley. Robert Hughes made this prescient observation in a review of an early Coburn exhibition at the Macquarie Galleries in Sydney, \‘Coburn is unlike any other significant Australian non-figurative painter in that his works are deadpan, unmarked by the evidence of struggle which gives other abstracts their peculiar intensity … It may all look effortless and inevitable, as though the problems of painting had given way to those of assembling a jigsaw puzzle. His intuition does not, it seems, unfold itself during the final creative act; everything is thought out beforehand\’.2 What he may have lacked in lyricism he compensated for through his astute instinct for colour and design. John Coburn\’s popularity has endured and continues to grow steadily as the years pass. Through his many solo exhibitions, important commissions and prestigious awards he has well and truly cemented his place in the canon of Australian painting. 1 Rozen, A., The Art of John Coburn, Ure Smith, Sydney, 1979, p. 10 2 Hughes, R., \‘Coburn Jigsaws\’, Nation, Sydney, 19 November 1960 HENRY MULHOLLAND
John Coburn -  Singing The Blues Ii

John Coburn - Singing The Blues Ii

Original 2000
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Net Price
Lot number: 36
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Singing the Blues II 2000 JOHN COBURN (1925-2006), Singing the Blues II 2000 oil on canvas, 149.5 x 130.0 cm signed lower right: Coburn bears date and inscription verso: JOHN COBURN/ 'SINGING THE BLUES II'/ 2000 , , Eva Breuer Art Dealer, Sydney, 2000 Private collection, New South Wales John Coburn: Jazz, Eva Breuer Art Dealer, Sydney, September - October 2000
John Coburn -  Tableland

John Coburn - Tableland

Original 1960
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 28
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Description: JOHN COBURN, (1925 – 2006), TABLELAND, 1960, oil on composition board SIGNED: signed lower right: Coburn. signed, dated and inscribed with title verso: JOHN COBURN \“TABLELAND\” … / 11/688 OLD STH HD RD ROSE BAY 9/60 DIMENSIONS: 91.5 x 122.0 cm PROVENANCE: Peter Laverty, Sydney, acquired directly from the artist in 1960 (label attached verso) Thence by descent Private collection, Sydney LITERATURE: Klepac, L., John Coburn: The Spirit of Colour, The Beagle Press, Sydney, 2003, pl. 33, pp. 57 (illus.), 213 ESSAY: 1960 was an important year for John Coburn; he won the prestigious Blake Prize for religious art, enabling the artist to buy his first house, which importantly came with a garage that of course was quickly converted into his studio. It was also the year he held his third solo exhibition in Sydney at the Macquarie Galleries, which attracted enthusiastic responses including that of the budding art critic Robert Hughes: \‘Coburn is unlike any other significant Australian non-figurative painter in that his work is deadpan, unmarked by the evidence of struggle which gives other abstracts their peculiar intensity. He pushes his greens and pinks and rusty browns around the canvas until they fall, almost with audible click, into place. It may all look effortless and inevitable, as though the problems of painting had given way to those of assembling a jigsaw puzzle. His intuition does not, it seems, unfold itself during the final creative act; everything is thought out beforehand … … Mr Coburn is an ideographic painter, and like others of his kind he works in a rigid range of symbols, in conformity with the traditions of ideographic art, with as little personal flourish as possible … the essence of Mr Coburn\’s vision is its dedicated, sustained search for a visual equivalent to the underlying order of nature – whatever it is that binds rocks, earth, fruit, sun, sky, flowers and people into an immense whole. He has a great deal to say; he proceeds slowly, and his work records the blind alleys as well as the steps forward, but this near-religious ambition gives it an impressive inner coherence\’.1 Hughes begins with an interesting observation because, at the time, abstract painting in Sydney was very much a lyrical affair. Many painters presented their abstract works as \‘landscapes\’ and therefore organic colour and curves were staple features. Coburn\’s broad primordial forms, with their slabs of secondary colour, must have come as a cool antidote to the wristy arabesques of the likes of Passmore and Olsen. As though compensating for the lack of lyricism in the work, the artist adds foreign matter such as sand to the paint in order to add complexity to the surface. The resulting richly textured surface serves to enhance the otherwise austere forms which make up much of the work. In Tableland, 1960, the moon or sun hangs high in the sky and anchors the work as \‘a landscape\’. This circular form also acts as a counterpoint to the angular planes, as well as giving a domestic scale to the shapes which make up the painting. These forms rise on two sturdy vertical trunks which support the notion of a tableland within the landscape, the floating forms nudging the images gently in the direction of the later works for which the artist is best known. John Coburn\’s popularity has endured and continued to grow steadily over many years, and through his many solo exhibitions, important commissions and prestigious awards he has well and truly cemented his place in the canon of Australian painting. 1. Hughes, R., \‘Coburn Jigsaws\’, Nation, Sydney, 19 November 1960 HENRY MULHOLLAND
John Coburn - Flame Tree; Garden Of Desire; Summer Garden; Wasteland

John Coburn - Flame Tree; Garden Of Desire; Summer Garden; Wasteland

Original 1976
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 43
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Lot Details Lot 43 John Coburn (1925-2006) FLAME TREE; GARDEN OF DESIRE; SUMMER GARDEN; WASTELAND Four color screenprints, 1976, on wove paper, signed, dated, titled and numbered 3/40, 47/50, 27/40 and 3/40, respectively, in pencil, with full margins. (4) Largest 27 3/8 x 42 1/2 inches; 695 x 1080 mm. C Dorothy Lewis 2013 Irrevocable Trust
John Coburn - Beast

John Coburn - Beast

Original 1985
Estimate:

Price:

Net Price
Lot number: 109
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
John Coburn Beast 1985 oil and gold leaf on canvas on board 60.5 x 76.0 cm signed lower right: Coburn signed, dated and inscribed verso: JOHN COBURN/ "BEAST"/ (OIL) 1985 Provenance: Collection of Phyl and Albert Stirling, Sydney Estate of the above Lawson-Menzies, Sydney, 23 February 2012, lot 5 (as Untitled (Black and Gold)) Private collection, Sydney
Arcadja LogoServices
Subscription
Advertising
Sponsored Auctions
Subscription

Arcadja
Our Product
Follow Arcadja on Facebook
Follow Arcadja on Twitter
Follow Arcadja on Google+
Follow Arcadja on Pinterest
Follow Arcadja on Tumblr