Cookies help Arcadja providing its services: browsing the portal you accept their use.
I cookies aiutano Arcadja a fornire i suoi servizi: navigando nel portale ne accettate l'utilizzo.
Cookies disclosure/Informativa cookies

  • Art Auctions, Ventes aux Encheres Art, Kunstauctionen, Subastas Arte, Leilões de Arte, Аукционы искусства, Aste
  • Research
  • Services
  • Enrollment
    • Enrollment
  • Arcadja
  • Search author
  • Login

Paul Cezanne

France (Aix-en-provence 1839 -  Aix-en-provence 1906 ) Wikipedia® : Paul Cezanne
CEZANNE Paul Les Baigneurs (grande Planche) (druick I; Venturi 1157)

Sotheby's
Mar 27, 2018
Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of Paul Cezanne at auctions worldwide.
Go to the complete price list of works Follow the artist with our email alert

 

Variants on Artist's name :

Cezanne

Cézanne Paul

 

Artworks in Arcadja
951

Some works of Paul Cezanne

Extracted between 951 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Paul Cezanne - Etudes De Personnages (recto); Sainte-antoine (verso)

Paul Cezanne - Etudes De Personnages (recto); Sainte-antoine (verso)

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 124
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Paul Cézanne (1839-1906) Etudes de personnages (recto); Sainte-Antoine (verso) Paul Cézanne (1839-1906) Etudes de personnages (recto); Sainte-Antoine (verso) pencil on paper (recto); watercolor and pencil on paper (verso) 4 ¾ x 8 ¼ in. (12.3 x 21 cm.) Drawn circa 1860-1865 (recto); Executed in 1873-1875 (verso) Provenance Paul Cézanne fils, Paris. Huguette Berès, Paris. Mr. and Mrs. Morton Rosenfeld, New York. Acquired from the above by the late owner, 1956.
Paul Cezanne - Satyres Et Nymphes

Paul Cezanne - Satyres Et Nymphes

Original 1867
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 392
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
SATYRES ET NYMPHES Paul Cézanne 1839 - 1906 Oil on canvas 9 1/2 by 12 in. 24.3 by 30.5 cm Paintedcirca1867. Provenance Ambroise Vollard, Paris Egisto Paolo Fabbri, Florence (acquired by 1921) Bignou Gallery, New York Stanley N. Barbee, New York (acquired at the above sale and sold: Parke Bernet Galleries, Inc., New York, April 20, 1944, lot 11) Private Collection, New Jersey (acquired at the above sale and sold: Parke Bernet Galleries, Inc., New York, January 19, 1950, lot 77) Private Collection, United States Aliette Olivar, France (and sold: Sotheby's, London, December 4, 1980, lot 515) Private Collection, London (acquired at the above sale and sold: Sotheby's, London, June 25, 2015, lot 341) Acquired at the above sale Exhibited Basel, Kunsthalle,Cézanne,1921, no. 38 New York, Bignou Gallery,Paul Cézanne,1936, no. 2 (titledNymphes et faunes) Detroit, Detroit Institute of Arts,Cézanne, 1937, n.n. Montreal, W. Scott & Sons,Paintings by French Masters, 1937, n.n. New York, Bignou Gallery,Cézanne and Renoir,1937, n.n. Bristol, Bristol Museum & Art Gallery,French Paintings of the 19th & 20th Centuries,1938, no. 8 New York, Bignou Gallery,A Selection of 19th & 20th Century French Painting,1939, no. 1 New York, Bignou Gallery,Paintings and Watercolors by Cézanne,1940, no. 3 New Haven, Connecticut, Yale University Art Gallery, 1945, n.n. Basel, Kunstmuseum,Paul Cézanne: Die Badenden,1989, no. 1, illustrated in the catalogue Literature Lionello Venturi,Cézanne, son art, son oeuvre, vol. I, Paris, 1936,no. 94, catalogued p. 87; vol. II, no. 94, illustrated pl.24 Alfonso Gatto & Sandra Orienti,L'Opera completa di Cézanne,Milan, 1970, no. 22, illustrated n.p. Gaëtan Picon & Sandra Orienti,Tout l'oeuvre peint de Cézanne, Paris, 1975, no. 22, illustrated p. 87 Sidney Geist,Interpreting Cézanne, Cambridge & London, 1988, n.n., illustrated p. 68 Mary TompkinsLewis,Cézanne's Early Imagery,Berkeley, 1989, fig. 94, illustrated p. 166 Mary Louise Krumrine,Paul Cézanne, The Bathers, Basel, 1989, no. 1, illustrated in color p. 40 John Rewald,The Paintings of Paul Cézanne: ACatalogue Raisonné, vol. I,London, 1996, no. 124, catalogued p. 110; vol. II, no. 124, illustrated p. 41 Nina M. Athanassoglou-Kallmyer,Cézanne and Provence, The Painter in His Culture, Chicago & London, 2003, fig. 5.8, illustrated p. 197 Francesca Bardazzi,Cézanne in Florence: Two Collectors and the 1910 Exhibition of Impressionism(exhibition catalogue),Milan, 2007, illustrated p. 258 Joseph J. Rishel,"Cézanne, Virgil, Poussin" inGauguin, Cézanne, Matisse: Visions of Arcadia, Philadelphia, 2012, fig. 156, illustrated p. 164 Walter Feilchenfeldt, Jayne Warman & David Nash,The Paintings of Paul Cézanne, an Online Catalogue Raisonné,www.cezannecatalogue.com,no. 592(accessed September 13,2017) Catalogue Note The present work is a rare surviving example in private hands of Cézanne\’s early, raw and fervent style before meeting Camille Pissarro in 1872. Cézanne\’s youth is beautifully documented in the letters written by his childhood friend and literary prodigy Émile Zola. The two boys were inseparable along with their third companion Baptistin Baille, together known as "les trois inséperables," and spent their childhood roaming the countryside, buried in books: "I was 16… we were three friends, three scamps still wearing out trousers on school benches…we had a need of fresh air, of sunshine, of paths lost at the bottom of ravines and of which we took possession as conquerors… Our loves at the time were above all the poets. We did not stroll alone, we had books in our pockets or in our game-bags. For a year Victor Hugo reigned over us an absolute monarch… Victor Hugo\’s dramas haunted us like magnificent visions… How often, after a long swim, the two or three of us performed whole acts on the bank of the little river" (Émile Zola in a 1856 letter, quoted in Nicholas Wadley,Cézanne and His Art, London, 1975, pp. 8-9). The opulent imagery of the sensory and literary lives of the young men form an important theme in Cézanne\’s early works as the artist delves into the luxuriant romantic elements of European culture. Cézanne\’s paintings of the 1860s are charged with generous energy and lavish imagination. The thick, black, velvety background of the present work creates a shallow space in which the frenetic action takes place, with the satyr contorted as he grips the bare body of a victimized nymph. The present work is reminiscent of another oil by Cézanne,L\’Enlèvement, dated to the same period, which was given as a gift to Zola and also exploring the theme of Greek mythology. The bare bodies in both works luminesce against the dark curtain behind them: disquietude and shadow reign supreme. Italian artist Egisto Fabbri is among the previous illustrious owners of this work. He wasa passionate man who fell in love with his muse and settled in Paris to live a Bohemian lifestyle with his fellow creatives.Before this point, the work was in the collection of Ambroise Vollard, one of the most important dealers of the twentieth century who offeredsignificant support to some of the most seminal artists of the period, amongthem Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Camille Pissarro, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh and Paul Cézanne. He championed the young artists before the world did, and his ownership of the present work speaks of its importance to the artist\’s oeuvre.Satyres et nymphes, among his other few works dating to before 1872, illustrates Cézanne\’s extraordinary instinctive talent for rendering narrative and atmosphere. It also sheds an intimate light on the experiences of a boy entranced by the sensual natural world and the romantic literature in which he happily immersed himself in the halcyon days of his youth.
Paul Cezanne - La Vie Des Champs

Paul Cezanne - La Vie Des Champs

Original 1876-1877
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Net Price
Lot number: 7
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Description: PAUL CÉZANNE (french 1839-1906) "LA VIE DES CHAMPS" Oil on canvas 10 7/8 x 13 7/8 in. (27.6 x 35.2cm) Executed in 1876-1877. provenance: Collection of Ambroise Vollard, Paris, France. Collection of Prince Antoine Bibesco, Paris, France. Hôtel Drouot, Paris, sale of June 27, 1931, lot 75. Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, New York. Parke-Bernet, New York, sale of January 6, 1949, lot 48. Galerie de l'Élysée, with Alex Maguy, Paris, France. Acquavella Galleries, New York, New York. Collection of Mrs. Elinor Dorrance Ingersoll. By descent in the family. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. exhibited: "Pictures, Drawings, and Sculptures of the French School of the Last 100 Years," Burlington Fine Arts Club, London, United Kingdom, 1922, no. 17 (exhibited as "Landscape"). "Paintings and Drawings by Paul Cézanne 1839-1906," Leicester Galleries, London, United Kingdom, June-July 1925, no. 18 (exhibited as "Paysage"). "Cézanne," Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 3-December 10, 1934, no. 7 (dated circa 1880). "Cézanne," Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais, Paris, France; Tate Gallery, London, United Kingdom and Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 30-September 1, 1996 (travelling exhibition, only exhibited in Philadelphia). literature: Ambroise Vollard, A Stockbook, no. 3314. Walter Sickert, "French Art of the Nineteenth Century," The Burlington Magazine for Connoisseurs, vol. 40, no. 231, p. 260-258, plate III, C. Lionello Venturi, Cézanne: Son Art, Son Oeuvre, Pierre Rosenberg, Paris, 1936, vol. 2, no. 251 (illustrated). Françoise Cachin, Isabelle Cahn and Walter Feilchenfeldt, Cézanne, an Exhibition Catalogue, Harry N. Abrams, New York, 1996, no. 43, p. 162-164 (illustrated). John Rewald, The Paintings of Paul Cézanne: A Catalogue Raisonné, Thames & Hudson, London, 1997, vol. 2, no. 282 (illustrated). Nina Athanassoglou-Kallmyer, Cézanne and Provence, The Painter in His Culture, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 2003, p. 204, fig. 5.18 (illustrated). Denis Coutagne, "The Jas de Bouffan Landscapes," Jas de Bouffan: Cézanne, Société Paul Cézanne, Hexagone, Aix-en-Provence, 2004, p. 98-139, fig. 86 (illustrated). Pavel Machotka, Cézanne: La Sensation à l'Oeuvre, The Eye and the Mind, Crès Editions, Marseille, 2008, vol. 1, fig. 78 and vol. 2, p. 73. Jean Colrat, Cézanne: Joindre les Mains Errantes de la Nature, Ph.D. Dissertation, Université d'Aix-Marseille, Presses de l'Université Paris-Sorbonne, Paris, 2013, p. 232, plate 110 (illustrated). W. Feilchenfeldt, J. Warman & D. Nash, The Paintings of Paul Cézanne, an online Catalogue Raisonné, no. 641 (illustrated). note: Reflecting on Paul Cézanne's career, Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) realized that few artists had a greater impact on the art of the 20th century, acknowledging "He was like the father of us all." In many respects, Cézanne was the first artist to explore abstraction in Western painting and in doing so, he paved the way for a new representation of perspective and space, free from any rule or hierarchy. Treating each aspect of his compositions with the same thoroughness, Cézanne left behind an important, yet complicated legacy: "the most difficult works of art [to access] and yet the most powerful [ones]," according to Philip Conisbee ("L'Atelier des Lauves" in Cézanne en Provence, exhibition catalogue, 2006, p. 257). Still, the artist remained misunderstood and criticized for a significant part of his life. It was not until 1895, when art dealer and gallery owner Ambroise Vollard (1866-1939) gave him his first solo exhibition, that he was able to redefine and demonstrate his true achievements. This was a major turning point for Cézanne's career and ultimately allowed him to secure a legacy as a modern master. Paul Cézanne was born in Aix-en-Provence in 1839. The eldest of three children, he grew up in a very well-to-do family, and largely lived up to his father's great expectations. In high school, he met Baptistin Baille (1841-1918) and Émile Zola (1840-1902), with whom he formed the Inséparables school group and created life-long friendships. Upon his father's request, Cézanne studied literature and law. However, he soon abandoned his legal career to study painting instead. Like Zola he ended up in Paris, the aspiration of most ambitious provincials. There, he lived comfortably thanks to the monthly allowance his father granted him. Rejected from the École des Beaux-Arts, he attended the Académie Suisse in 1862, where he studied and copied with great interest the works of contempories such as Eugène Delacroix (1798-1863) and Gustave Courbet (1819-1877), and the Old Masters like Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640) and Diego Velásquez (1599-1660). Cézanne's first oils are marked by a romantic touch and reveal a certain appeal for allegories. Inspired by his friend Camille Pissarro (1830-1903), he later developed an Impressionist technique, attempting to capture the ever-changing beauty of light through small dashes of color while working en plein air. As a result, he participated in the first Impressionist exhibition, organized by Nadar (1820-1910), in 1874. There, he displayed three paintings which proved radically shocking due to their style and subject. He ultimately decided not to exhibit alongside his fellow Impressionists again until 1877, the year "La Vie des Champs" was executed. Saddened by the lackluster interest in his works that year, Cézanne chose to break ties with the Parisian Impressionistic scene and returned to his native Provence for a while. He left his wife Hortense and his son Paul behind, and resumed life at 'Jas de Bouffan,' his parents' estate near Aix-en-Provence. The works produced in the South during this period are very diverse and quite difficult to date. Yet they share the same attention to light and to colorful brushwork for which Cézanne was known. "La Vie des Champs" was produced during a period when Cézanne still embraced the influence of the Impressionist movement, along with a number of his fellow artists, including his great mentor Camille Pissarro. However, in this particular work, Cézanne departs from the typical dark, more "couillard" (bulky) style of his earlier paintings, which often portrayed violent narratives (see "The Murder," painted in 1875 and now at the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool, United Kingdom). Instead, "La Vie des Champs" depicts a peaceful gathering of farmhands at rest in a lush field, with a stream and verdant hill in the background. The composition seems to have been carefully planned. It is anchored by the "statuesque" silhouette of the water bearing woman in the middle; she is truly the focus of the painting. Magnified by the jug on her head, she ultimately stretches up the entire painting toward the roof in the background. The present work improves on the watercolor sketch on which it is based (and which still remains in private hands). By extending the canvas - the watercolor lacks the second tree on the right - and by depicting the landscape in greater detail, Cézanne is able to accentuate the overall symmetry of the scene. For Cézanne, "the chief thing is the picture as a whole, the coherence of the composition" Danish art critic Merete Bodelsen (1907-1986) observed (quoted in John Rewald, The Paintings of Paul Cézanne: A Catalogue Raisonné, 1997, no. 301). The great trees spreading their branches in the foreground, the small human figures below them, the long sweep of the field stretching deep into the picture and counterbalanced by the steep mountain in the background, enable the viewer to immediately embrace the painting in its entirety. The expressive brushwork also participates in the sentiment of deep harmony. They appear somewhat random, yet vivid and compact at the same time. Directionally, the touches are very distinct: horizontal in the foreground, vertical in the background as the hill fills up the entire surface of the painting. Despite its typical Impressionist style, "La Vie des Champs" does not seem to have been directly painted sur le motif, i.e. outside. It is rather a carefully planned composition which Cézanne executed in the studio. "La Vie des Champs" actually belongs to a unique group of paintings dated to the mid-1870s. All manifest a different approach to anecdotal painting. According to Joseph J. Rishel, former curator of European Paintings and Sculptures at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, "modest in scale; they are perhaps best described as rural genre images. They have the timeless quality of visual fables." ( Cézanne, exhibition catalogue, 1996, p. 162). Indeed, the different figures look like actors about to perform "in a rustic operetta" ( Ibid). The entire composition itself is reminiscent of a stage set: the two trees frame the picture on both sides, as two curtains would frame a stage set. The boat, the villa and the wooded hill all appear like theater props. These elements provide a whimsical quality to the scene. Similarly to "La Moisson," executed around the same time, and which can be analyzed as our work's compositional and stylistic twin, the landscape, specifically the house ("mas") on the top of the hill, links this setting to Provence. The farm workers are reminiscent of Camille Pissarro's, and the hilltop house in the background is typical of the South. Yet the scene is not specifically associated with any of the small villages around Aix-en-Provence. Cézanne intended the painting to be an imaginary scene, not a landscape study. As Vincent Van Gogh (1853-1890) immediately understood while looking at "La Moisson," "La Vie des Champs" is a vision of Provence; it suggests all its characteristic aspect on the canvas without referring to a specific place. An admirer of Latin poetry since his youth, Cézanne conceived his native Provence to be a replica of Virgil's dreamy Arcadia, the fairytale-like country that he described in his poem "Eclogues." Much like Arcadia, Provence appeared to Cézanne as a luxuriant land with bountiful groves and meadows, alluring blue skies and a perennial summer. "La Vie des Champs" portrays this idea of a luscious and generous South. With its dazzling style and bright colors, the painting stands out as a composite of pastoral theme, bucolic landscape and realistic image of honest workers, all depicted engaged in their seasonal labor in the fields. It differs immensely from more contemporary compositions such as Van Gogh's harvest scenes in the Arles region, which incorporate factories and trains in the background. Instead, the present work is inspired from the art of the past. While many have analyzed the red dress of "La Vie des Champs'" water bearer as an homage to Camille Corot's or Eugène Delacroix's bold style, Cézanne in fact derived the motif from Nicolas Poussin's (1594-1665) masterpiece of "Eliézer et Rebecca", which shows two women with clay jugs on their heads. Both captured in an antique style, they offer a glimpse into Cézanne's true inspiration. This reference to Nicolas Poussin is not the least surprising since Cézanne always revered the Old Master, confessing he wished to "do Poussin again after nature." (quoted in John Canaday, Mainstreams of Modern Art, 1959, p. 340.) Through the prism of Poussin's paintings, Cézanne credited Provence with a noble and immortal quality, making it the premise behind a new classicism based on nature. In doing so, he imitated an old rhetorical trope of Provençale literary culture, which was being revived by contemporary southern writers who embraced the emerging ideas of regionalism. In a letter to his parents dated 1874, which he probably wrote from Paris, Cézanne indicated how important his native region was to him: "It would make me extremely happy to work in the Midi, where the scenery offers so many opportunities for my painting" (quoted in Nina Athanassoglou-Kallmyer, Cézanne and Provence: The Painter in His Culture, 2003, p. 8). In the present work, Cézanne demonstrates his love for his homeland. A testimony to the artist's origins, it summarizes all of Provence's ethereal beauty and melancholy on one canvas. Provence is represented as the dreamlike land of a golden age come true in the modern age. With the present work, Cézanne made his prophecy come true: "I'd like to combine melancholy and sunshine... There's a sadness in Provence which no one has expressed (…) You really need to see and feel your subject very clearly, and then If I express myself with distinction and power, there's my Poussin, there's my classicism." (quoted in Joachim Gasquet, Cézanne: A Memoir with Conversation, 1991, p. 211). "La Vie des Champs" has a long and distinguished provenance. First owned by the legendary art dealer, Ambroise Vollard, it was sold to the wealthy Romanian aristocrat, Antoine Bibesco - one of the first critics to expose the British public to works of Henri Matisse (1869-1954) and Cézanne. Following its sale at Drouot in 1931, "La Vie des Champs" departed for the United States, only to return to France once. It passed through the hands of many of the greatest galleries of the past century including the Pierre Matisse Gallery and the Galerie de l'Élysée. Dorrance H. Hamilton inherited the painting from her mother, Elinor Dorrance Ingersoll, who acquired it from Acquavella Galleries, a gallery recognized as the doorstep for important Impressionist canvases arriving in the United States. The painting was exhibited twice at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, once in 1934 and later in 1996, on the occasion of the centenary of the artist's fine solo exhibition in Paris.
Paul Cezanne - Les Baigneurs (grande Planche) (druick I; Venturi 1157)

Paul Cezanne - Les Baigneurs (grande Planche) (druick I; Venturi 1157)

Original 1896-98
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 71
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Paul Cézanne LES BAIGNEURS (GRANDE PLANCHE) (DRUICK I; VENTURI 1157) 1839 - 1906 Lithograph printed in colours, 1896-8, Druick's third (final) state, after the removal of the lithographic inscription, from the edition of approximately 100 impressions, printed by Auguste Clot, published by Ambroise Vollard, Paris, on MBM laid paper, framed image: 410 by 510mm 16 1/8 by 20in sheet: 480 by 570mm 17 7/8 by 22 1/2 in
Paul Cezanne - Maisons Près D'un Pont, La Montagne Sainte-victoire

Paul Cezanne - Maisons Près D'un Pont, La Montagne Sainte-victoire

Original 1885
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 54
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Paul Cézanne (1839-1906) Maisons près d'un pont, la Montagne Sainte-Victoire aquarelle et graphite sur papier 36 x 54.8 cm. Exécuté vers 1885 watercolour and pencil on paper 14 ¼ x 21 5/8 in. Executed circa 1885. Cette œuvre sera incluse au catalogue raisonné en ligne de l'Œuvre de Paul Cézanne, dont la section "œuvres sur papier" est en cours de préparation, sous la direction de Walter Feilchenfeldt, David Nash et Jayne Warman. Provenance Paul Guillaume, Paris. Walter Halvorsen, Oslo (acquis auprès de celui-ci, en 1916). Huguette Bérès, Paris (acquis auprès de celui-ci). Puis par descendance au propriétaire actuel. Pre-Lot Text Ancienne collection Huguette Bérès C'est un honneur pour Christie\’s de proposer en vente une sélection de tableaux et d'œuvres sur papier provenant de l\’ancienne collection Huguette Berès. «A renowned connoisseur dealer» selon la phrase de Souren Melikian, le grand critique du New York Times. Elle fut une collectionneuse d\’une rare audace, libérée de toute convention. Huguette Berès a été célébrée tout au long de sa carrière pour son goût précis, élégant et très juste. Située 25 quai Voltaire, la Galerie Berès a vu le jour en 1951. Pendant les soixante années qui suivirent, la galerie Huguette Bérès se concentra essentiellement sur les estampes Japonaises gravées sur bois dites du mouvement Ukiyo-e et la peinture des avant-gardes de l\’art français de la fin du XIXe et du début XXe siècle et plus particulièrement les œuvres sur papier. Aux quatre œuvres sur papier et au paravent de Bonnard figurant dans ce catalogue s\’ajoute une sélection de neuf tableaux qui seront présentés lors de la vente d\’Art Impressionniste et Moderne le 23 mars prochain à Paris. Cet ensemble, couronné par le tableau d\’Edouard Vuillard, Madame Vuillard épluchant des légumes (lot 258 de la vente du 23 mars), illustre parfaitement la passion d\’Huguette Berès pour l\’art français au tournant du XXe siècle. Peint en 1895, cette huile est considérée comme un merveilleux exemple du style intimiste typique de l\’artiste, décrit par Jean Clair comme une «apothéose de la lumière du jour avant la tyrannie de l\’électricité» (J. Clair, Autoportrait au visage absent, Paris, 2008, p. 36). La lumière est également le sujet principal du tableau de Georges Seurat, Le Mouillage à Grandcamp (lot 257 dans la vente du 23 mars), dans lequel l\’artiste inonde son paysage marin d\’une clarté scintillante et d\’une charmante touche pointilliste et miroitante. Les recherches d\’Huguette Berès sur Georges Seurat ainsi que les expositions de ses œuvres à la Galerie, dont cette délicate huile sur panneau de 1885, ont contribué à la renommée internationale de cet immense peintre et dessinateur trop tôt disparu. L\’exposition récente du Grand Palais à Paris consacrée à Gauguin l\’alchimiste a également été l\’occasion de mettre l\’accent sur l\’importance de la recherche technique et de l\’innovation comme moteur créatif chez l\’artiste. Le monotype Tête de Tahitienne (lot 55 de cette vente) constitue ainsi un aperçu de la manière dont Gauguin utilise ses expérimentations pour créer une image chargée d\’exotisme. L'on retrouve enfin dans la Maison près d\’un pont de Paul Cézanne (lot 54 de cette vente) la finesse toute poétique d\’une esquisse où l\’utilisation du papier blanc met en valeur la palette vive et raffinée de l\’artiste. Si chacune de ces œuvres constitue un témoignage émouvant de ces quatre grands maîtres de l\’art moderne français, elles reflètent surtout l'œil intelligent et sensible autant que la quête constante de qualité d\’Huguette Berès dans l\’édification de sa collection. Christies is honoured to present for sale a selection of paintings and works on paper from the former collection of Huguette Berès. In the words of respected New York Times critic Souren Melikian, \“A renowned connoisseur dealer\”. She was a particularly bold collector who defied convention. All through her career, Huguette Berès was celebrated for her defined taste, which was elegant and very discerning. The Galerie Berès at 25, quai Voltaire opened in 1951. In the sixty years that followed, the Galerie Huguette Bérès specialised mainly in Japanese woodblock prints in the Ukiyo-e style and late 19th century and early 20th century French avant-gardist paintings, particularly works on paper. In addition to the five works on paper and the Bonnard screen featured in this catalogue, we have a selection of six paintings which will be presented at the Impressionist and Modern Art sale taking place in Paris on 23 March 2018. This set of works, complete with Édouard Vuillard\’s superb Madame Vuillard épluchant des légumes (lot 258 in the 23 March sale), is a perfect illustration of Huguette Berès\’ passion for French art at the turn of the 20th century. Dating from 1895, this oil painting is considered a wonderful example of the artist\’s characteristically intimate style, described by Jean Clair as the \“apotheosis of daylight before the tyranny of electricity\” (J. Clair, Autoportrait au visage absent, Paris, 2008, p. 36). Light is also the main subject of Georges Seurat\’s, Le Mouillage à Grandcamp (lot 257 in the 23 March sale), in which the artist floods his seascape with a shimmering light, with a delightful gleaming, pointillist touch. The research that Huguette Berès carried out on Georges Seurat and her exhibitions of his works at the Gallery, including this delicate oil on board from 1885, contributed to the international renown of this outstanding painter and draughtsman, who died very young. The recent Gauguin l\’alchimiste exhibition at the Grand Palais in Paris was an opportunity to highlight the importance of technical research and innovation as a creative driving force for the artist. The monotype Tête de Tahitienne (lot 55 of this sale), for example, gives us an insight into how Gauguin used his experiments to create an image charged with exoticism. And again in Paul Cézanne\’s Maison près d\’un pont (lot 54 of this sale) we see the quite poetic finesse of a sketch in which the use of the white paper highlights the artist\’s vivid, refined palette. Not only is each of these works a moving testament to these four masters of French modern art, they are also a reflection of Huguette Berès\’ clever and sensitive eye, and her constant quest for quality when it came to building up her collection. Literature A. Lhote, Les Invariants plastiques, Paris, 1967, p. 38 (illustré; titré 'La montagne Sainte-Geneviève'; erronément daté '1905'). J. Rewald, Les aquarelles de Paul Cézanne, Paris, 1984, p. 121, no. 149 (illustré). Exhibited Martigny, Fondation Pierre Gianadda, Paul Cézanne, Le chant de la terre, juin-novembre 2017, p. 333, no. 50 (illustré en couleurs, p. 209). Post Lot Text Maisons près d'un pont, la Montagne Sainte-Victoire, composition subtilement exécutée vers 1885, est manifeste des développements artistiques majeurs de Paul Cézanne au cours des années 1880. Alors sous l\’influence de son ami Camille Pissarro et de leurs moments passés ensemble à Pontoise et Auvers-sur-Oise, le style de l'artiste évolue progressivement de l\’héritage de ses prédécesseurs impressionnistes français vers un style plus mature, nourri par son attachement à sa terre natale, la Provence. Entre 1883 et 1887, Cézanne réside principalement dans cette région et décide de s'en inspirer pour se consacrer à la représentation de paysages qui l'entouraient. Dans la présente aquarelle, l'artiste nous en livre une interprétation très personnelle en associant la teinte du papier, les lignes structurelles du paysage et de délicates touches de couleurs apportées par l'aquarelle afin de souligner la forme architecturale dévoilée à la surface du papier. Comme l'a écrit John Rewald à propos de ses aquarelles de la fin des années 1880, l'artiste «s'est attaché à établir un équilibre entre la maîtrise, la sobriété et l\’éloquence du dessin et l\’usage tout aussi parcimonieux et adroit de touches de couleurs lumineuses [...] Elles représentent, si ce n\’est un changement radical du rôle conventionnel du papier blanc dans les aquarelles, tout le moins un type d'harmonie à laquelle la blancheur du support est essentielle. Ce vide omniprésent intensifie la relation mystérieuse entre les rares lignes marquées et les rares accents de couleur.» (J. Rewald cité in op. cit, p. 28). Executed circa 1885, Maisons près d'un pont, la Montagne Sainte-Victoire, a skillfully-rendered composition, exemplifies Paul Cézanne's significant artistic developments made during the 1880s. Emerging from the influence of his friend Camille Pissarro and their time spent together in Pontoise and Auvers-sur-Oise, Cézanne\’s style gradually evolved from the legacy of the French Impressionists before him to a mature style grounded in his adoration of his birthplace, Provence. Between 1883 and 1887, Cézanne, who had resided predominantly in the area around Aix, chose to focus primarily on the lush landscapes of his surroundings. As in the present watercolour, the relationship between the paper ground, the structural lines of the landscape and the soft zones of colour which define the space and the subject, foster Cézanne's personal depiction of the world and combine to form architectural shapes which emerge from the surface of the paper. As John Rewald wrote in respect to his watercolours from the late 1880s, the artist "strove to establish a balance between his masterful, economic yet eloquent drawing and the equally economic yet deft use of luminous spots of colours [...] They represent, if not a radical departure from the conventional concept of the role of white paper in watercolours, at least a type of harmony to which the whiteness of the support is essential. Its all-embracing emptiness intensifies the mysterious relationship between a few firm lines and a few colour accents" (John Rewald, quoted in op. cit, p. 28).
Arcadja LogoServices
Subscription
Advertising
Sponsored Auctions
Subscription

Arcadja
Our Product
Follow Arcadja on Facebook
Follow Arcadja on Twitter
Follow Arcadja on Google+
Follow Arcadja on Pinterest
Follow Arcadja on Tumblr