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Paul Cezanne

France (Aix-en-provence 1839 -  Aix-en-provence 1906 ) Wikipedia® : Paul Cezanne
CEZANNE Paul  Les Baigneurs

Phillips, De Pury & Luxembourg /Oct 17, 2017
16,934.80 - 25,402.20
31,890.00

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Variants on Artist's name :

Cezanne

Cézanne Paul

 

Artworks in Arcadja
922

Some works of Paul Cezanne

Extracted between 922 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Paul Cezanne - Jeune Fille En Méditation / Young Lady In Meditation

Paul Cezanne - Jeune Fille En Méditation / Young Lady In Meditation

Original
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Lot number: 412
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CÉZANNE Paul , JEUNE FILLE EN MÉDITATION / YOUNG LADY IN MEDITATION Technique , oil on canvas mounted on board framed Certificate , with certificate by Louis Malbos (Judicial expert of art in Aix-en-Provence) and Philippe Cézanne (Representative of the Society of Paul Cézanne / great-grand son of Paul Cézanne) Literature , D. Coutagne, \”Cézanne ou la peinture en jeu\”, Limoges, 1982, p.57 M.T. Lewis, \”Cézanne's Early Imagery\”, London, 1989, p.117, no.54 J. Rewald, \”The Paintings of Paul Cézanne, A Catalogue Raisonné\”, London, 1996, vol. 2, no.10 P. Matchotka, \”Cézanne: La Sensation à l'oeuvre\”, Marseille, 2008, vol.1, No.17, vol.2, p.34 board / 板 : 28.5×19.5 cm canvas / 畫布 / キャンバス : 27.5×18.5 cm Year , cir. 1860
Paul Cezanne - Étude Pour "la Partie De Pêche"

Paul Cezanne - Étude Pour "la Partie De Pêche"

Original 1873-74
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Lot number: 259
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ÉTUDE POUR "LA PARTIE DE PÊCHE" Pencil on paper 4 by 6 3/4 in. 10.2 by 17 cm Executedcirca1873-74. Provenance Estate of the artist Paul Cézanne fils, Paris (by descent from the above) Valentine Gallery, New York Mrs. Philip B. Stanley (acquired from the above on January 27, 1937) Frances Stanley Stout (by descent from the above in 1970) Sam Stout, Connecticut (by descent from the above in 2009) Acquired from the above Exhibited Paris, Galerie Renou et Colle, Aquarelles et baignades de Cézanne,1935, n.n. Literature Ambroise Vollard, Paul Cezanne (exhibition catalogue), Paris, 1914, illustrated p. 73 Lionello Venturi,Cézanne, son art-son oeuvre,vol. I,Paris, 1936, no. 1211, catalogued p. 295; vol. II, no. 1211, illustrated pl. 339(titled Pêcheurs à la ligneand dated 1872-75) Adrien Chappuis,The Drawings of Paul Cézanne: A Catalogue Raisonné,vol. I, London, 1973, no. 259; illustratedvol. II, n.p.
Paul Cezanne - Nature Morte

Paul Cezanne - Nature Morte

Original 1890
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Gross Price
Lot number: 27
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NATURE MORTE Paul Cézanne 1839 - 1906 Oil on canvas 11 1/8 by 15 7/8 in. 28.3 by 40.5 cm Paintedcirca1890. Ambroise Vollard, Paris Count Harry Kessler, Weimar (acquired from the above on February 14, 1902) Galerie Etienne Bignou, Paris Royan Middelton, Aberdeen Paul Rosenberg& Co., New York Heinz Berggruen,Paris Thomas Gibson Fine Art, London Sale:Sotheby's New York, November 11, 1999, lot 111 Acquired at the above sale Exhibited Berlin, Paul Cassirer, Cézanne – Ausstellung, 1921, no. 39 (titled Apfel und Birne) Glasgow, Glasgow Art Museum, XIX-XX Century French Painting, 1930, no. 17 London, Alex. Reid & Lefevre, Renoir and the Post-Impressionists, 1930, no. 11 Edinburgh, Royal Scottish Academy & London, Tate Gallery, Paintings by Cézanne, 1954, no. 41 (dated circa 1887 and with incorrect dimensions) Tokyo, National Museum of Western Art; Fukuoka, Cultural Center & Kyoto, Municipal Museum, Cézanne, 1974-75, no. 43, illustrated in the catalogue New York, Acquavella Galleries, XIX and XX Century Master Paintings, 1982, no. 6, illustrated in the catalogue Tübingen, Kunsthalle& Zurich, Kunsthaus, Cézanne – Gemälde, 1993, no. 57, illustrated in color in the catalogue Literature Eugenio d\’Ors, Paul Cézanne, Paris, 1930, illustrated p. 9 Christian Zervos, \“De l\’importance de l\’objet dans la peinture d\’aujourd\’hui\” in Cahiers d\’Art, 1930, no. 7, illustrated p. 115 Gualtieri Di San Lazzaro, Paul Cézanne, Paris, 1936, illustrated fig. 31 Eugenio d\’Ors, Paul Cézanne, Paris, 1936, illustrated pl. 31 Lionello Venturi, Cézanne, Son art- son oeuvre, Paris, 1936, vol. I, no. 206, catalogued p. 111; vol. II, no. 206, illustrated pl. 55 (dated circa 1873-77) Meyer Shapiro, \“The Apples of Cézanne, an Essay on the Meaning of Still-Life\” in Art New Annual XXXIV, 1968, illustrated p. 52 Alfonso Gatto & Sandra Orienti, L\’Opera completa di Cézanne, Milan, 1970, no. 204, illustrated p. 95 (dated 1873-77 and titled Piatto con frutta) John Rewald, The Paintings of Paul Cézanne, Catalogue Raisonné, New York, 1996, vol. I, no. 677, catalogued p. 433; vol. II, no.677, illustrated p. 232 Bertram Schmidt, Cézannes Lehre, Kiel, 2004, illustrated fig. 84 Pavel Machotka, La Sensation à l\’oeuvre, Marseille, 2008, vol. I, illustrated fig. 284; vol. II, catalogued p. 184 Jean Colrat, Cézanne: Joindre les mains errantes de la nature, Paris, 2013, no. 68, illustrated p. 174 Walter Feilchenfeldt, Jayne Warman & David Nash, "Nature morte, c. 1890 (cat. no. 802)." The Paintings of Paul Cézanne: An Online Catalogue Raisonné. http://www.cezannecatalogue.com/catalogue/entry.php?id=657 (accessed September 6, 2017) Paintedcirca1890,Nature morteencapsulates Cézanne\’s artistic achievement, and displaysthe brilliance and economy which characterize his best work. This strikingly modern compositionexemplifies the artist's unrivaled facility with the medium and his ability to imbue a still-life with all of the subtlety and emotional potency of portraiture. Cézanne\’s still-lifes have long been recognized among his greatest achievements, the works which demonstrate most clearly the innovations that led to the stylistic developments of early twentieth-century art. His vision breathed new life into the tradition of still-life painting, and his accomplishmentshad aprofound impact on the generations of artists that followed. Picasso proclaimed that \“Cézanne was like the father of us all,\” and this statement has remained true to this day, with his painting, particularly still-lifes, continuing to influence artists in thetwenty-first century. Cézanne executed a powerful series of medium-scale still-lifes during the1880s and 1890s. His depictions of fruit from this period focus on the inherent geometry of objects and explore the spatialchallenges of representing three-dimensional form on a two-dimensional surface.The present work achieves its dynamic composition through a contrast between the rounded shapes of thefruitand the pronounced horizontal of the background and the table-top. Cézanne\’s still-life series became increasingly complex, and would culminate in celebrated paintings such asLes Grosses pommesofcirca1890 andRideau, cruchon et compotierpainted in 1893-94. Cézanne initially approached the genre during the first decade of his artistic production, the 1860s. He executed a number of varied still-lifes, romantic in feeling and based on close observation of reality. In the subsequent decades, his pictorial language became more sophisticated and his compositions more complex. Richard Kendall wrote about Cézanne\’s mature paintings: \“By this stage in his career, the still-life had taken on a special significance for [Cézanne], and he was to become one of the most original and dedicated exponents of the form. Far from being just a pretext for picture-making, the groups of apples, pears, cherries or flowers were for Cézanneas much a part of nature\’s extravagant beauty as the trees and hillsides of Provence, andas likely to produce his \‘vibrating sensations\’ as the landscape itself. According to Joachim Gasquet, Cézanne once claimed tooverhearconversationsbetween thefruit he was painting, and approached each item in a group as he would a human portrait\” (R. Kendall,Cézanne by Himself: Drawings, Paintings, Writings, London, 1988, p. 11). Nature morte imparts the full rangeof expressive potential that Gasquet identified in Cézanne's still-lifes. Theapples are constructed through careful geometries and intrusions of bright yellow tones. Cézanne grounds the gentle curves of the fruit with a clear horizon line provided by the table's back edge. He creates a sense of space and volume that gives the fruit a palpable presence -there is an intrinsic logic to the composition wholly unique to Cézanne's artistic vision. Cézanne\’s mature still-lifes are considered the harbingers of twentieth-century Modernism, and provided a key inspiration for the Cubist compositions of Picasso and Braque. As they formulated a new artistic language during the early years of Cubism, these artists were inspired by Cézanne\’s radical approach to form. Although Cézanne\’s art was well known and widely exhibited during his lifetime, the first major retrospective of his work was held at the Grand Palais in Paris in 1907, a year after his death. This comprehensive view of his oeuvre was an instant inspiration to many artists, including JuanGris and Henri Matisse. Many of Matisse's still lifes, including examples such asLes Pommes sur la table, sur fond vertof 1916, possess a certain weightlessness of the still life elements anda certain ambiguity in the treatment of space on the table top surface. Botharthistoriansandartists havearguedthatCézannereached the very pinnacle of his genius within the genre of still-life. This genre – unlike portrait orplein airpainting – allowed him the greatest time in which to capture his subject, since in the studio environment he could create and control the composition, arranging the elements in ways that provided an infinite variety of formal problems tobe solved on the canvas. The young painter Louis le Bail described how Cézanne composed a still-life, reflecting the great care and deliberation with which he approached the process: \“Cézanne arranged the fruits, contrasting the tones one against the other, making the complementaries vibrate, balancing the fruits as he wanted them to be, using coins of one or two sous for the purpose. He brought to this task the greatest care and many precautions; one guessed it was a feast for him. When he finished, Cézanne explained to his young colleague, \‘The main thing is the modeling; one should not even say modeling, but modulating\’\” (quoted in J. Rewald,Cézanne: A Biography, New York, 1986, p. 228). Discussing Cézanne\’s still-life paintings, the English artist and critic Roger Fry noted that he \“is distinguished among artists of the highest rank by the fact that he devoted so large a part of his time to this class of picture, that he achieved in still-life the expression of the most exalted feelings and the deepest intuitions of his nature. Rembrandt alone, and only in the rarest examples, or in accessories, can be compared to him in this respect. For one cannot deny that Cézanne gave a new character to his still-lifes. Nothing else but still-life allowed him sufficient calm and leisure, and admitted all the delays which were necessary to him for plumbing the depths of his idea. But there, before the still-life, put together not with too ephemeral flowers, but with onions, apples, or other robust and long-enduring fruits, he could pursue till it was exhausted his probing analysis of the chromatic whole. But through the bewildering labyrinth of this analysis he held always like Ariadne\’s thread, the notion that the changes of color correspond to movements of planes. He sought always to trace this correspondence throughout all the diverse modifications which changes of local color introduced into the observed resultant… it is hard to exaggerate their importance in the expression of Cézanne\’s genius or the necessity of studying them for its comprehension, because it is in them that he appears to have established his principles of design and theories of form\” (R. Fry,Cézanne: A Study of his Development, Chicago, 1927, pp. 37 & 50). One of the first owners ofNature mortewas Count Harry Kessler. Kessler was a cultural connoisseurwhom W. H. Auden referred to as "probably the most cosmopolitan man who ever lived." Involved in many forms of the fine and performing arts, works from his collection are now found in many of the world\’s most important institutions, including the Barnes Foundation. He was an earlier supporter and proponent of the works of Edvard Munch, who in turn executed numerous portraits of his patron. Henri Matisse, Les Pommes sur la table, sur fond vert, 1916, oil on canvas, Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, Virginia Henri Matisse, Les Pommes sur la table, sur fond vert, 1916, oil on canvas, Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, Virginia Georges Braque, Fruit Dish, 1908, oil on canvas, Moderna Museet, Stockholm Fig. 3 Paul Cézanne, Nature morte au compotier, 1879-80, oil on canvas, The Musuem of Modern Art, New York Fig. 4 Photograph of Paul Cézanne circa 1906 Paul Cézanne, Rideau, Cruchon et Compotier, circa 1893-94, oil on canvas, sold: Sotheby\’s, New York, Impressionist & Modern Art from the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. John Hay Whitney, May 10, 1999, lot 23, for $60,502,500
Paul Cezanne -  Les Baigneurs

Paul Cezanne - Les Baigneurs

Original 1896-98
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Gross Price
Lot number: 1
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PAUL CÉZANNE - Les baigneurs (grande planche) (The Large Bathers), circa 1896-98 Dimensions: I. 16 1/2 x 20 1/4 in. (41.9 x 51.4 cm) S. 19 x 21 5/8 in. (48.3 x 54.9 cm) Medium: Lithograph in colors, on MBM laid paper with watermark, with full margins, the colors strong. Literature: Ambroise, Vollard, Recollections of a Picture Dealer, London, 1936, pp. 247-248 Lionello, Venturi, Cézanne: son Art - son Oeuvre, No. 1157, Vol. 1, Paris, 1936, p. 287 Alphonse Kann maquette repr. Vol. 2, pl. 332 Una E. Johnson, Ambroise Vollard,Editeur, 1867-1939, New York, 1944, No. 30, pp. 15, 68-9, 193 Melvin Waldfogel, Caillebotte, Vollard and Cézanne’s "Baigneurs au Repos", Gazette des Beaux-Arts, February 1965, pp. 113-20, repr. p. 114 Jean Cherpin, L’Oeuvre gravé de Cézanne, Arts et Livres de Provence: Bulletin, No. 82, 1972, No. 7, pp. 47-58, 68-9, first state repr. p. 53 Douglas W. Druick, Cézanne, Vollard and Lithography: the Ottawa Maquette for the "Large Bathers" Colour Lithograph, The National Gallery of Canada Bulletin, 19, 1972, 1974, pp. 1-36, repr. p. 8 Douglas Druick and William Rubin (ed.), Cézanne’s Lithographs, Cézanne: the Late Work, London, 1978, pp. 119-37, first state repr. p. 125
Paul Cezanne - Baigneuses, La Montagne Sainte-victoire Au Fond

Paul Cezanne - Baigneuses, La Montagne Sainte-victoire Au Fond

Original 1902
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Price:

Lot number: 10
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PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION Paul Cézanne BAIGNEUSES, LA MONTAGNE SAINTE-VICTOIRE AU FOND 1839 - 1906 watercolour and pencil on paper 12.5 by 21.3cm. 4 7/8 by 8 3/8 in. Executed circa 1902-06. There is a pencil sketch of houses on the verso. Paul Cézanne fils, Paris Dr Otto Wertheimer, Paris Robert von Hirsch, Basel (sold: Sotheby's, London, The Robert von Hirsch Collection, 27th June 1978, lot 835) The British Rail Pension Fund (sold: Sotheby\\\\’s, London, The Property of the British Rail Pension Fund, 4th April 1989, lot 18) Purchased at the above sale by the present owner Paris, Galerie Renou et Poyet, Aquarelles et Baignades de Cézanne, 1935 Zurich, Kunsthaus, Paul Cézanne, 1956, no. 141 (titled Badende Frauen and as dating from 1900-06) Tübingen, Kunsthalle & Zurich, Kunsthaus, Paul Cézanne Aquarelle 1866-1906, 1982, no. 118, illustrated in colour in the catalogue (titled Baigneuses) Hamilton, The Picker Art Gallery, Colgate University; Austin, Archer M. Huntington Art Gallery, The University of Texas & Palm Beach, The Society of the Four Arts, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Works from a British Collection, 1986-87, no. 6, illustrated in the catalogue Norwich, Castle Museum, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Works from a British Collection, 1987, no. 15 (titled Baigneuses) Basel, Museum of Fine Arts, Paul Cézanne: The Bathers, 1989, no. 92, illustrated in colour in the catalogue (titled Baigneuses devant une montagne) Lionello Venturi, Cézanne, son art - son œuvre, Paris, 1936, vol. I, no. 1108, catalogued p. 279; vol. II, no. 1108, illustrated pl. 321 (titled Baigneuses and as dating from 1900-06) Lionello Venturi, 'Sur les dernières années de Cézanne\\\\’, in Minotaure, no. 9, Paris, 1936, illustrated fig. 12 Jean Cassou, Cézanne: Les Baigneuses, Paris, 1947, illustrated in colour Francis Jourdain, Cézanne, Paris, 1950, illustrated in colour (titled Baigneuses and as dating from 1900-06) Melvin Waldfogel, 'A Problem in Cézanne's Grandes Baigneuses\\\\’, in The Burlington Magazine, London, May 1962, illustrated fig. 37 Kurt Badt, Das Spätwerk Cézannes, Constance, 1971, fig. 14, illustrated p. 49 William Rubin, Cézanne - the Late Work, London, 1978, mentioned p. 399 John Rewald, Paul Cézanne. The Watercolours, A Catalogue Raisonné, London, 1983, no. 607, illustrated (titled Baigneuses devant une montagne) Matthew Simms, Cézanne's Watercolors: Between Drawing and Painting, New Haven & London, 2008, no. 132, illustrated in colour p. 181 (titled Bathers and as dating from 1894-1906) Brilliantly coloured and sublimely composed, Baigneuses, La Montagne Saint-Victoire au fond combines two of the most important subjects of Cézanne\\\\’s œuvre – bathers and the majestic Montagne Sainte-Victoire. The subject of bathers preoccupied Cézanne from the 1870s onwards and, as the most consistently recurring theme in his œuvre, forms a major part of his artistic legacy. This ground-breaking group of works revolutionised the traditional concept of representing the human figure and as such this series proved crucial to the development of twentieth century art. The present work is a particularly beautiful example of his watercolour studies for the later Baigneuses and illustrates his total mastery of the medium. As Mary T. Lewis writes: \\\\‘Among such later versions, [the present work] is one of his most richly composed. Three distinct groups of nudes, the smallest in number in the centre, are harmoniously placed within a landscape that enhances their tripartite arrangement. The strong diagonal of the intensely blue river in the foreground corresponds to the distant line of the mountain [...]. The colour of this small Bathers is rich and continuous, and allows nature to embrace the nudes fully. Figures, water, trees and mountain all glow with a radiant blue which at times merges with yellow to suggest a soft green\\\\’ (M. T. Lewis in Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Works from a British Collection (exhibition catalogue), op. cit., p. 36). Throughout his career Cézanne had used watercolours as a means of thinking through and exploring ideas for larger-scale oil compositions. The present work relates closely to one of the three late Grandes baigneuses that Cézanne was working on at the time of his death, now in the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and provides an insight into Cézanne\\\\’s working practices. Whilst the oil shows the same triangular orchestration, in the watercolour Cézanne introduces a third group of figures in the centre of the composition and significantly, the recognisable outline of Saint-Victoire in the distance. The extent to which the watercolour differs from the oil suggests not only that Cézanne used the medium as a means of exploring compositional variations but also that he rejoiced in it for its own inherent qualities and the freedom of expression it allowed him. In comparison to the static monumentality of the oil, the present work, although rigorously conceived, is characterised by an immediacy and energy. As Matthew Simms explains: \\\\‘This lively, gestural handling [...] was as much a means for Cézanne to render a sense of the dramatic action taking place in his depicted scenarios as it was a means for him to register his own emotional participation in the subject matter. If Cézanne\\\\’s handling in his watercolour sketches for the large bathers [...] calls to mind this kind of emotional participation, it also reflects more recent concerns developed in his contemporaneous watercolour views of landscape and still life. In these contemporary watercolours, Cézanne sought to render the visual sensations of vibrant light and air in the south of France. Although based on imagination rather than observation, Cézanne invokes in these bather sketches a similar quality of shimmering light and air. More than this, he also adds to the vibrant envelope a quality of vital movement that sets these watercolours off from his contemporary landscape and still-life watercolours\\\\’ (M. Simms, op. cit., pp. 182-183). The deft application of paint in vivid tones of blue and green and the lively interplay of forms create a work of particular vivacity. Simms goes on: \\\\‘In comparison with similar oil versions, this work seems more animated and flowing perhaps because the entire process of its making is retained in each transparent touch of pigment\\\\’ (ibid., p. 36). The legacy of these watercolours – and the late Baigneuses paintings as a whole – was far-reaching. Celebrated when they were first exhibited by Ambroise Vollard in 1905, they inspired a subsequent generation of artists who saw a new world of possibility in their innovative use of space and light. An integral chapter in the history of the birth of Cubism, they paved the way for many of the key developments of twentieth century art. Baigneuses, La Montagne Saint-Victoire au fond has so far belonged to two preeminent collections. One of its early owners was legendary collector Robert von Hirsch. Von Hirsch amassed one of the most significant collections of the early twentieth century encompassing not only Impressionist and Modern paintings, but also Old Master paintings, Medieval and Renaissance works of art and furniture; of all of these his collection of Cézanne watercolours is reported to have provided him with the greatest joy. The present watercolour was among the works sold at his estate sale at Sotheby\\\\’s London in 1978 and it was at the time of this sale that the pencil sketch on the verso was discovered. It was at this point that it joined its second great collection – the British Rail Pension Fund. Although much criticised at its inception, the fund was an unparalleled success and as Michel Strauss recalls: \\\\‘over the years the term \\\\‘a British rail picture\\\\’ has become an accolade and an enhancement to any provenance\\\\’ (M. Strauss, Pictures, Passions and Eye. A Life at Sotheby\\\\’s, London, 2011, p. 10).
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