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Maurizio Cattelan

Italy (Padova 1960 ) Wikipedia® : Maurizio Cattelan
CATTELAN Maurizio The 1:6 Scale Wrong Gallery

Phillips, De Pury & Luxembourg
Apr 23, 2019
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Artworks in Arcadja
614

Some works of Maurizio Cattelan

Extracted between 614 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Maurizio Cattelan - Mini-me

Maurizio Cattelan - Mini-me

Original 1999
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Lot number: 513
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Description:
Maurizio Cattelan MINI-ME resin, rubber, fabric, wool, synthetic hair and paint 14 by 8 1/4 by 10 1/4 in. 35.6 by 21 by 26 cm. Executed in 1999, this work is a unique variant from an edition of 10. Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Or Massimo de Carlo, Milan Private Collection, New York Giraud Pissarro Segalot, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Kunsthalle Basel,Maurizio Cattelan 30/1999, October - November 1999, cat. no. 5, n.p., illustrated in color (anotherexampleexhibited) New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum,Maurizio Cattelan: All, November 2011 - January 2012, cat. no. 69, pp. 76 and 219, illustrated in color (another example exhibited) Monnaie de Paris,Maurizio Cattelan.Not Afraid of Love, October 2016 - January 2017 (anotherexampleexhibited) Literature Giorgio Verzotti,Maurizio Cattelan, Milan 1999, p. 47, illustrated in color (another example illustrated) Francesco Bonami, Nancy Spector and Barbara Vanderlinden,Maurizio Cattelan, London 2000, p. 125, illustrated in color (another example illustrated) Francesco Bonami, Nancy Spector, Barbara Vanderlinden and Massimiliano Gioni,Maurizio Cattelan, London 2003, p. 139, illustrated in color (another example illustrated) Catalogue Note Maurizio Cattelan\’s Mini-Me isfrom an edition of 10 miniature sculptures made in 1999. Each work depicts Cattelan in his own image, in an assortment of action-figure sized manifestations. While each edition bears similar resemblance to the artist, they are all clothed differently, based on different imitations of the Cattelan's garments. Cattelan was propelled to international fame following his inclusion in the Italian Pavilion at the 47th Venice Biennale in 1997. There, he displayed his work Tourists, which saw a multitude of pigeons perched on ceiling pipes, gazing over visitors as they meandered the space below. Wielding a bemused expression, Mini-Me\’sraised brow eludes to an air of antagonistic judgment. Its perching, omniscient stance is reminiscent of Cattelan\’s aforementioned work and suggests the continuation of an inquiry into the duality of being completely embedded in something on the one hand, while being starkly removed from it on the other. This duality was felt by Cattelan throughout his childhood, where his strict Roman Catholic upbringing cemented feelings of estrangement and separation from global events. Born in Padua, Italy in 1960, Cattelan\’s Italian heritage is central to his work. He has been linked to the Italian-bred Art Povera movement for his unconventional approaches to material and conceptual audacity—an association that he is enamored by, but ultimately refutes. Despite not belonging exclusively to an Italian artistic tradition, Cattelan is displaced due to his insular battle between a contemporary reality and a collective nostalgia for the traditional notion of Italy that no longer exists. Cattelan states: \“This is why nomadism is so important today; not only does it provide a constant reminder of what being an outsider feels like, but it helps you to return home and see the places you live with re-opened eyes\” (the artist in conversation with Robert Nickas in Francesco Bonami, Nancy Spector and Barbara Vanderlinden, Maurizio Cattelan, London 2000, p. 132). Growing up in middle-class Italy, Cattelan was at once naïve to the social changes of the larger world, yet today works within the complex global hybridity of present culture. His 2008 work, Daddy-Daddy,depicts a life-size sculpture of Disney\’s 1997 animation Pinocchio. Operating at a distance from his peers, the puppet's filmic quest is to become \‘a real boy.' In Cattelan\’s rendition—in a cruel twist of fate—Pinocchio is seen lying face down in a pool of water as though he has fallen in and drowned. Presented for the first time in the 2008 exhibition, theanyspacewhatsoever, at the Guggenheim Museum in New York, Daddy-Daddy can be viewed in parallel to Cattelan\’s Mini-Me renditions of himself. Both sculptures share a strong Italian heritage, a large nose and a supercharged ego coupled with a sense of existential angst. In a nod to another staple movie of 1990s, the work\’s title Mini-Me bears reference to the spy movie parody Austin Powers and particularly references the small malevolent clone of the villain, Dr. Evil. Here, Cattelan\’s own Mini-Me doppelganger embodies the shared roguish charisma for which both Dr. Evil and the artist are known. Notorious for his outlandish nature and instinct towards replication, Cattelan explores self-hood through the guise of humility, referencing himself as a troublemaker. While Cattelan\’s highly conceptual sculptures can at first be striking, the artist does not see them at provocateurs. He states: \“I actually think that reality is far more provocative than my art…I\’m always borrowing pieces—crumbs really—of everyday reality. If you think my work is very provocative, it means that reality is extremely provocative, and we just don\’t react to it\” (Ibid, p. 17). Conceptual grandeur is vast throughout Cattelan\’s practice. Once the immediacy of encountering a work has faded, audiences are invited to explore the pools of abstract meaning that have influenced their creation. Despite a trajectory of individual and context specific sculptural endeavors, \‘the self\’ is a theme that Cattelan unusually returned to repeatedly. His whimsical self-portraits are at once self-deprecating and aggrandizing. As such,Mini Me is an important emblem of Cattelan\’s inner consciousness. Although his public persona is that of a charming boisterous troublemaker, his work on a serious level endures as a manifestation of his innermost thoughts. Mini-Me suggests a certain existential anxiety, not just for Cattelan himself, but also a generalized societal apprehension as seen in society. Cattelan's refreshing awareness of the politics and absurdities of the modern world establishes itself in artworks that provide new perspectives on contextualizing oneself in relation to contemporary debate and global politics.
Maurizio Cattelan - Il Giardino Delle Delizie (the Garden Of Delights)

Maurizio Cattelan - Il Giardino Delle Delizie (the Garden Of Delights)

Original 1994
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Lot number: 234
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Maurizio Cattelan (b. 1960) Il Giardino delle Delizie (The Garden of Delights) painted plaster, plastic and light bulbs under a glass dome 43.5 x 41 x 41cm. Executed in 1994, this work is number two from an edition of three, plus one artist's proof Provenance Galleria Massimo De Carlo, Milan. Acquired from the above by the present owner circa 2005.
Maurizio Cattelan - The 1:6 Scale Wrong Gallery

Maurizio Cattelan - The 1:6 Scale Wrong Gallery

Original 2006
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Lot number: 244
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Maurizio Cattelan The 1:6 Scale Wrong Gallery 2006 Multiple comprising wood, brass, steel, aluminum, resin, plastic, glass and electric lighting, with accompanying copy of the Wrong Gallery Times, all contained in the original cardboard box. 18 3/8 x 11 1/2 x 6 3/4 in. (46.7 x 29.2 x 17.1 cm) Numbered 39/2500 in black ink on the base, with the printed Cattelan copyright, published by Cerealart Multiples, Philadelphia.
Maurizio Cattelan - Maurizio Cattelan, L.o.v.e.

Maurizio Cattelan - Maurizio Cattelan, L.o.v.e.

Original 2015
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Lot number: 337
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Maurizio Cattelan L.O.V.E. Seletti 2015 concrete 15.5 h × 5.75 w × 5.75 d in (39 × 15 × 15 cm) Signed with stamped manufacturer's mark to underside '1:28 Scale Reproduction of L.O.V.E. by Maurizio Cattelan Installed in 2010 in Piazza Affari Milan Italy Seletti'. This worked is from an unnumbered edition of 1800 produced by Seletti, Milan. Sold with original packaging.ConditionWork shows a stable hairline fissure near mid-section showing as a casting flaw. Fine condition with no visible losses, surface wear or discoloration noted.
Maurizio Cattelan - Untitled (zorro)

Maurizio Cattelan - Untitled (zorro)

Original 1997
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Lot number: 201
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UNTITLED (ZORRO) Maurizio Cattelan B. 1960 acrylic on canvas 70.2 by 70.2 cm. 27 5/8 by 27 5/8 in. Executed in 1997. Provenance Galleria Massimo de Carlo, Milan Private Collection, Milan Christie's, London, 24 October 2004, Lot 72 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Francesco Bonami, Nancy Spector and Barbara Vanderlinden, Eds.,Maurizio Cattelan, Hong Kong 2000, p. 41, illustrated in colour Catalogue Note Maurizio Cattelan has been the art world\’s premier enfant terrible from the earliest days of his practice, and Untitled (Zorro) from 1997 demonstrates – with a typified formal modesty – the superb, cognisant wit of the Italian artist. Born in Padua in 1960, Cattelan would come of age in his native Italy dogged by social and political upheaval. The Zorro motif thus appears in Cattelan\’s practice as a complex symbol that overlays the pop culture of Hollywood and the anarchism that marked Cattelan\’s youth, with a wry parody of the vaunted monochromes of Lucio Fontana. Executed in a warm gold, Untitled (Zorro) is a unique painting in a series of monochrome Zorro works that Cattelan initiated in 1993. Taking its formal cues from the Concetti Spaziali(1949-1960) of Fontana, the present work appropriates the iconic \“slashing\” method by which the artist is known, refashioning the archetypal modernist incisions as the calling card of the vigilante hero Zorro. Alluding to the simplicity of Fontana\’s gesture and his seniority as the forefather of Italian Modernism, Cattelan both lampoons and lionises Fontana, deriding his method whilst hijacking his identity as a masked hero of contemporary art. Cattelan\’s artistic style is indivisible from his comedic style: reactive, versatile, unbridled, and acutely aware, his matter-of-fact delivery always belies the complex associations, biographic slant and art-historical narratives that form the inner workings of his practice. Cattelan\’s cultivated persona is itself integral to his art practice. \“We live in the empire of marketing, spectacle and seduction,\” the artist says, \“so one of the roles of artists and curators is to deconstruct those strategies, to resist their logic, to use them, and/or find new means of activism against them\” (Maurizio Cattelan cited in: \‘I Want to Be Famous – Strategies for Successful Living; Interview with Barbara Casavecchia\’, in: Francesco Bonami, Nancy Spector and Barbara Vanderlinden, Eds., Maurizio Cattelan, London 2000, p. 136). Exemplified by Cattelan\’s intervention at the Museum of Modern Art in 1998 – where a hired actor masqueraded as Pablo Picasso in an oversize, moulded caricature head – the institutions and idols of contemporary art are only challenged and advanced through their reclamation, repurposing and critique; a process that Cattelan implements through a tragi-comic, self-sacrificial humour. Untitled (Zorro) seamlessly blends the aesthetics of Modernism with the brilliant, comedic nuance that Cattelan has become famous for. Not only does the pierced canvas wonderfully epitomise Cattelan\’s own reputation as a rebellious anti-authoritarian, but it also extends its subtle critique to the idea of the artist-as-hero and the glorification of the artist-signature. In an oeuvre that has included coordinating a fictitious biennial, installing a gold toilet at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and exhibiting his gallerist, Massimo De Carlo, attached to the wall with adhesive tape, the present work is emblematic of Cattelan\’s distinguished career as one of the most innovative and lauded contemporary artists.
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