Cookies help Arcadja providing its services: browsing the portal you accept their use.
I cookies aiutano Arcadja a fornire i suoi servizi: navigando nel portale ne accettate l'utilizzo.
Cookies disclosure/Informativa cookies

  • Art Auctions, Ventes aux Encheres Art, Kunstauctionen, Subastas Arte, Leilões de Arte, Аукционы искусства, Aste
  • Research
  • Services
  • Enrollment
    • Enrollment
  • Arcadja
  • Search author
  • Login

Antonio Canal Canaletto

Italy (1697 -  1768 )
CANALETTO Antonio Canal Title Page From Vedute Altre Prese Da I Luoghi Altre Ideate

Galerie Koller /Mar 31, 2017
1,119.61 - 1,399.51
Not Sold

Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of Antonio Canal Canaletto at auctions worldwide.
Go to the complete price list of works Follow the artist with our email alert

 

Variants on Artist's name :

Canaletto Giovanni Antonio

Canal Antonio Canaletto

 

Artworks in Arcadja
907

Some works of Antonio Canal Canaletto

Extracted between 907 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Antonio Canal Canaletto - The Coronation Of The Doge On The Scala Dei Giganti

Antonio Canal Canaletto - The Coronation Of The Doge On The Scala Dei Giganti

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 44
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Giovanni Antonio Canal, called Canaletto THE CORONATION OF THE DOGE ON THE SCALA DEI GIGANTI VENICE 1697 - 1768 Pen and brown ink and three shades of grey wash, heightened with touches of white over black chalk, within original brown ink framing lines 389 by 554 mm Provenance Probably Lodovico Furlanetto, Venice, Sir Richard Colt Hoare, 2nd Baronet, acquired in Venice probably from Furlanetto, circa 1787-89, thence by inheritance at Stourhead, Wiltshire, Stourhead Heirlooms sale, London, Christie's, 2 June 1883, lot. 28 (to Grindley, on behalf of a member of the Hoare family), by descent in the Hoare family until 2005; Private Collection Exhibited Venice, Fondazione Giorgio Cini, Canaletto. Disegni-Dipinti-Incisioni (catalogue by Alessandro Bettagno), 1982, pp. 51-2, no. 66 Literature W.G. Constable & J.G. Links, Canaletto. Giovanni Antonio Canal (1697-1768), 3rd edition, Oxford 1989, vol. II, p. 528, no. 632, reproduced vol. I, plate 115 Imposing in scale and composition, totally engaging in terms of narrative, and brilliantly accomplished in its virtuosic lighting and handling of the media, this superbly preserved drawing ranks among the greatest that Canaletto ever made. It belongs to a highly original series of twelve depictions of the ceremonies and festivals of the Doges, the Feste Ducali, conceived in the first instance as drawings, but made specifically to be engraved. Ten of the drawings are known today, four of them in the British Museum, two in the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., and the remainder elsewhere1; this is the first drawing from this extraordinary series, so unusual within Canaletto\\\’s work, yet so definitive of his genius, to appear at auction since 1974, when two were offered for sale in these Rooms, from the collection of Eva, Countess of Rosebery.2 Though Canaletto\\\’s drawings and paintings are often very accurate renderings of specific locations – frequently, one would assume, at the request of one of the artist\\\’s illustrious noble patrons – images like these of actual historical events are relatively rare in his work. Yet he clearly relished the opportunities offered by the subjects of this series of depictions of ceremonies and pageants, such a fundamental element in the Venetian spirit, and the compositions that he produced for this series are among his most original and inventive. In this work, the third in the series, we see the Doge being crowned at the top of the Scala dei Giganti, the grand, ceremonial staircase that forms the focus of the courtyard of the Doge\\\’s Palace. Or rather, we see what is clearly a hugely important ceremony going on, and somewhere in the middle of it we know the Doge, and this important moment, are to be found. Yet in fact, it is not the Doge himself and his coronation that is the subject here, it is Venice, her life and her people. As Peter Kerber so aptly wrote in the catalogue of the recently opened Getty Museum exhibition on depictions of historical moments in the 18th century, \\\‘The Doge is but a tiny figure…: the true protagonist of this and the other depictions in the series is the Serene Republic, embodied by its rituals and traditions.\\\’3 Drawing, perhaps, on what he had learned early in life from his theatrical scene-designer father, Canaletto has here conceived and constructed his composition so as to maximise in every possible way the impact and drama of his scene. Both in scale and in compositional complexity, this is one of the most ambitious of all the artist\\\’s drawings. Although the imposing façade of the building that forms the background of the entire sheet could potentially have made the composition seem flat, Canaletto has used every imaginable device to counteract this: the great staircase, flanked at the top by Sansovino\\\’s giant statues of Mars and Neptune from which it gets its name, Scala dei Giganti, is set subtly off centre and at a slight angle, to highlight the recession; the depth of the scene is further emphasised by the dramatic shadows cast by the wing of the building to the left; the façade itself is broken up by a remarkable array of windows and shutters, open and closed, on various levels, and by a plethora of other architectural details; and, perhaps most importantly of all, the whole scene is populated with a massive crowd of onlookers, brilliantly rendered with minimalist penstrokes and vibrant highlights, whose motion the artist has hardly managed to arrest. You can almost hear the hubbub of excited conversation. On the roof of the building to the left, figures crane perilously forward to catch a glimpse of the action while below in the courtyard the guards, their rifles and hats emphasised with deft touches of darker ink wash, resolutely try to hold back the throng. Everything in this wonderfully rich image speaks of an essentially Venetian wit and lightness of being, from the brilliance of the architecture and the lighting to the animation of the endlessly varied, and mostly masked figures, who seem about to step onto the stage for a popular theatre production (perhaps together with the actors portrayed in Canaletto\\\’s sheet of figures studies, which is lot 48 below). The exact origin and chronology of this joy-filled series of drawings is unclear, but they surely originate from a major commission, seemingly the last such instruction that Canaletto received. The compositions exist in the form of drawings by Canaletto, prints by Giovanni Battista Brustoloni which credit the designs to Canaletto (fig. 1), and paintings by Guardi, as well as through various other painted and drawn copies. This has given rise, over the years, to much discussion of which set of images came first, and whether there were originally also paintings of these subjects by Canaletto, but the consensus is now that the initial commission was for Canaletto to produce drawings that would then be engraved by Brustoloni, and that subsequently, probably around 1775, Guardi was asked to make a series of paintings, now in the collections of the Louvre, based on these prints.4 Eight of the prints were announced for sale (though not yet actually printed) by the publisher, Lodovico Furlanetto, in March 1766, and four months later, in July, he obtained permission to extend the series to twelve plates.5 There is no way of knowing exactly how much earlier than this the drawings were made, but one of them, The Doge attends the Giovedi Grasso Festival in the Piazzetta, now in Washington6, includes the arms of the Doge Alvise Mocenigo IV, who was elected in 1763, so it seems reasonable to assume that the drawings were all made some time between then and 1766, and in the case of those compositions that show events specific to the election of the Doge, rather than annual festivities, that they were based on Canaletto\\\’s first hand observation of the festivities following the election of 1763. Though the full series of the Feste Ducali prints consists of twelve compositions, drawings by Canaletto are only known for ten of them. These ten sheets were discovered in a bookseller\\\’s in Venice (very probably the premises of the publisher Furlanetto himself), by Sir Richard Colt Hoare sometime between 1787 and 1789, when the dealer Giovanni Maria Sasso described them to Sir Abraham Hume, noting that they were as fine as any paintings.7 Hoare proudly took the ten drawings back to Stourhead, in Wiltshire, where for the next century or so they were apparently hung, as a set, over a fireplace in the library. (If this is indeed true, the library must have been kept very dark, as the drawings remain even today in outstandingly good, fresh condition.) In 1883, much of the contents of Stourhead were dispersed at auction, and the Canalettos were included in that sale, but this drawing and one other8 were bought back by a family member, thereby remaining in the hands of the Hoare family until sold to the present owner a few years ago. The drawing has therefore only changed hands three times since its creation and has not been seen on the auction market since 1883. Although the series of drawings to which this work belongs was executed very late in Canaletto\\\’s career (no dated work is known from after 17669, and he died only two years later), they are none the less all full of the vibrant, optimistic energy of the artist\\\’s drawings from much earlier periods, yet given an added resonance by the historical subject-matter that ostensibly provides the focus for each scene. As already mentioned, although Canaletto did occasionally depict real historical events, as in the splendid painting of around 1735, The Doge Visiting the Church and Scuola di San Rocco, in the National Gallery, London10, the vast majority of his paintings and drawings, even the most specifically topographical, are not linked to any particular moment. Indeed, the narrative content in this series of the festivals of the Doges is unparalleled in any other project undertaken by the artist, but the application of his extraordinary pictorial skills to this somewhat unfamiliar type of composition simply serves to add yet more layers of potential excitement and satisfaction for the viewer. All the visual riches of more typical masterpieces such as the Capriccio: Terrace and Loggia of a Palace on the Lagoon, in the Royal Collection (currently starring in the canaletto exhibition at the Queen's Gallery, London11) are also abundantly present in the drawing now under discussion, but here they are interacting in a wonderful way with another, entirely different, realm of content and expression. It is hard to imagine a more total expression of the essence of Canaletto\\\’s genius as a draughtsman than this extraordinary drawing, which – both literally and figuratively – transports us to the very heart of 18th-century Venice, in all its glory, wit and mystery. That it was loved and cherished for so long by one of the greatest families of English cognoscenti is the final piece in the jigsaw of elements that together make this by far the most important drawing by Canaletto to have come to the market in recent decades, and one of the most illuminating and enlightening, as well as one of the most visually exciting and satisfying, that he ever made. 1. Constable/Links, op. cit., vol. II, pp. 525-32, nos. 630-639 2. Constable/Links nos. 636 & 637; sale, London, Sotheby's, 11 December 1974, lots 10 & 11 3. Eyewitness Views. Making History in Eighteenth-Century Europe, exh. cat., Los Angeles, J. Paul Getty Museum/Minneapolis Institute of Art/Cleveland Museum of Art, 2017-18, p. 15 4. The twelve paintings by Guardi are all in the collections of the Louvre, but three of them are on deposit in museums elsewhere (in Brussels, Grenoble and Nantes). 5. Constable/Links, op. cit., pp. 525-6, citing earlier sources 6. Constable/Links no. 636 7. Constable/Links, op. cit., p. 527 8. Constable/Links no. 630 9. The latest known dated drawing is a view of the interior of St. Mark's, Venice, now in the Hamburg Kunsthalle; Constable/Links no. 558 10. Inv. no. NG937 11. Constable/Links no. 821; Rosie Razzall and Lucy Whitaker, Canaletto & the Art of Venice, exh. cat., London, The Queen's Gallery, 2017, no. 138
Antonio Canal Canaletto - The Portico With The Lantern

Antonio Canal Canaletto - The Portico With The Lantern

Original 1740
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 206
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
206 ANTONIO DA CANAL, IL CANALETTO The Portico with the Lantern. Etching, circa 1740. 303x435 mm; 12x17 1/8 inches, wide margins. Third state (of 3), with the letters and number lower left. Remondini, letter R watermark (Bromberg 53-54). A brilliant, richly-inked impression with strong contrasts and with crisp, partially inky plate edges. Canaletto (1697-1768), whose work embodies the city of Venice perhaps more than any other artist, was a highly fashionable painter already known primarily for his topographical views that were popular among Europeans (particularly English visitors) on the Grand Tour, when he embarked on a series of some 30 Venice-inspired etchings in the early 1740s. This project was encouraged by and mostly financed by Joseph Smith, the British consul to the Venetian Republic, who also acted as Canaletto's agent on behalf of foreign collectors. The Portico with the Lantern typifies Canaletto's approach to his Venice etchings, most of which are capricci or imaginary views, blending familiar Venetian vernacular architectural elements--the vine covered portico--with classical motifs such as the triumphal arch and temple at the right. De Vesme 10; Bromberg 10
Antonio Canal Canaletto - The Grand Canal, Venice, With San Geremia, Palazzo Labia, And The Entrance To The Cannareggio

Antonio Canal Canaletto - The Grand Canal, Venice, With San Geremia, Palazzo Labia, And The Entrance To The Cannareggio

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 46
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
English follower of Giovanni Antonio Canal, il Canaletto The Grand Canal, Venice, with San Geremia, Palazzo Labia, and the entrance to the Cannareggio oil on canvas 29 ¾ x 49 7/8 in. (75.4 x 126.5 cm.) The Cannaregio canal was the principal northwest route into Venice from the mainland during the 18th century. The present view shows its entrance off the Grand Canal, with the church and campanile of San Geremia to the left and the Palazzo Querini detti Papozze along with the low façade of the Palazzo Emo to the right. Spanning the opening of the canal is the Ponte delle Guglie with the four obelisks (guglie) after which it was named. The church of San Geremia, shown here prior to its remodelling by Carlo Corbellini between 1753 and 1760, stands before the Palazzo Labia, which was built at the very end of the 17th century for a recently ennobled Catalan family. The Labia family launched an ambitious decorative scheme within their palazzo, employing Giovanni Battista Tiepolo to paint a scheme of large-scale frescoes between 1746 and 1747 to decorate the ballroom. Further up the canal, beyond the Ponte delle Guglie, the buildings of the former Jewish Ghetto can be seen. Canaletto’’’’’’’’s renowned depictions of Venice were hugely popular across Europe during the 18th century, especially after the painter’’’’’’’’s sojourn in England between 1746 and 1755. The present work is largely based on a view by Canaletto, painted as part of series of twelve images of the Grand Canal, now in the collection of Her Majesty the Queen of England (RCIN 400532). These works formed the basis for the fourteen engraved plates published by Visentini in his Prospectus Magni Canalis Venetiarum (Venice, 1735; fig. 1). The engravings provide a terminus post quem for the paintings, which likely date to around 1730. The pictures formed a significant part of the collection of the British Consul to Venice, Joseph Smith (c. 1682-1770), Canaletto’’’’’’’’s most important patron, and were later sold to King George III in 1762. Significantly for the present work, Canaletto added to his painting a balustrade on the left waterfront along with a statue of Saint John of Nepomuk shortly after its construction in 1742. These details do not appear in the present English version of the composition, suggesting that it was either painted from the original between c. 1730 and 1742 or that the composition was based on Visentini’’’’’’’’s engraving of Canaletto’’’’’’’’s picture.
Antonio Canal Canaletto - Title Page From Vedute Altre Prese Da I Luoghi Altre Ideate

Antonio Canal Canaletto - Title Page From Vedute Altre Prese Da I Luoghi Altre Ideate

Original
Estimate:
Starting price:

Price:

Lot number: 3632
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
CANALETTO, GIOVANNI ANTONIO (1697 Venice 1768) Title page from Vedute Altre prese da i Luoghi altre ideate, 1742-43. Etching. 30 x 42.8 cm (sheet size: 41.5 x 54.5 cm). De Vesme 1; Bromberg 1; Montecuccoli 1; Succi 2013, I, S.271, Nr.1, Zustand II (of II, with dedication). - Very fine strong and richly contrasting impression with broad margins. Scattered foxing in the margins. Scattered creases in the lower margin. The smoothed vertical central fold has a restored tear in the upper margin. Verso minor remains of old mount. Overall in good condition. Provenance: - Collection of Montecuccoli degli Erri. --------------- CANALETTO, GIOVANNI ANTONIO (1697 Venedig 1768) Titelblatt von Vedute Altre prese da i Luoghi altre ideate, 1742-43. Radierung. 30 x 42,8 cm (Bogengrösse: 41,5 x 54,5 cm). De Vesme 1; Bromberg 1; Montecuccoli 1; Succi 2013, I, S.271, Nr.1, Zustand II (von II, mit der Widmung). - Sehr schöner, kräftiger und kontrastreicher Druck mit breiten Rändern. Dort vereinzelte dezente Flecken. Einzelne Quetschfalten im unteren Rand. Die geglättete vertikale Mittelfalz im oberen Rand mit restauriertem Einriss. Verso wenige Reste alter Montierung. Insgesamt in schöner Erhaltung. Provenienz: - Sammlung Montecuccoli degli Erri.
Antonio Canal Canaletto - Cappricio Con Una Cappella Sulla Riva Di Una Collina Con Il Mare

Antonio Canal Canaletto - Cappricio Con Una Cappella Sulla Riva Di Una Collina Con Il Mare

Original 1768
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 283
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Giovanni Antonio Canal, detto il Canaletto (Venezia 1697 – 1768) - Cappricio con una cappella sulla riva di una collina con il mare Capriccio di rovine classiche - Dipinti Antichi - Cambi Casa d'Aste Lotto 283 Giovanni Antonio Canal, detto il Canaletto (Venezia 1697 – 1768) coppia di tempere su carta, cm 37,5x54,5, in cornice dorata I due dipinti illustrati fanno parte di una ristrettissima cerchia di lavori di Canaletto nei quali, intorno al 1740, il maestro si dedicò alla tecnica della tempera su carta, intorno al 1740 circa. Si tratta di una serie di sole sei opere conosciute di dimensioni molto simile raffiguranti paesaggi di terraferma con rovine classiche e architetture con figure. Il primo dei due rappresenta una cappella su di una collina in prossimità della costa, fiancheggiata da una strada che scende verso il primo piano dove sono presenti rovine. Sul fondo un ponte ad arco che collega gli edifici del lato sinistro della composizione mentre figurette schizzate velocemente animano la scena. Questa composizione può essere messa in relazione a disegni noti del pittore, uno schizzo conservato nello Schlossmuseum di Weimar (JG Links, un integratore a Canaletto di WG Constable, London, 1998 , pag. 53, n. 805 *, pl. 240), un altro, molto più rifinito, nel Victoria and Albert Museum di Londra (Constable I, pl.152, II, n. 805). La seconda composizione, dai toni più luminosi mostra invece rovine architettoniche con un grande arco sulla sinistra che sfonda prospetticamente verso un paesaggio con architetture che compare sullo sfondo.Anche in questo caso alcune figure animano la scena in primo piano. Questa composizione è a tutt’oggi inedita anche se ricorda i primi disegni romani, in particolare le rovine di un’edificio a cupola e un arco riprodotti in un disegno conservato a Windsor (Constable I, pl.153, II, n 815;. Kozakiewicz I, p illustrata 0,226), mentre la parte inferiore del lato destro è ripresa in controparte in un disegno di Bellotto (Hessischen Landesmuseum, Darmstadt) derivato probabilmente da Canaletto e da un’incisione (Kozakiewicz nn. 114-115, entrambi illustrati) Esposizioni: Barcellona, Centro di Cultura Contemporanea, Canaletto: Una Vanècia Imaginaria, 20 Febbraio - 13 maggio 2001 Madrid, Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Canaletto: Una Venecia Imaginaria, 29 maggio - 2 SETTEMBRE 2001 Passariano (Udine), Villa Manin, Da Canaletto a Zuccarelli: il paesaggio veneto del Settecento, 8 agosto - 16 novembre 2003 Bibliografia Canaletto: Una Vanècia Imaginaria, 2001 Catalogo della mostra di Barcellona, pp.172-7, n. 67-70 Canaletto: Una Venecia Imaginaria, 2001 Catalogo della mostra di Madrid, Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, pp. 222-7, n .77-80 Da Canaletto a Zuccarelli: il paesaggio veneto del Settecento, 2003 Catalogo della mostra di Pasarino, pp.384-9, n.105-8 Scheda del Prof. Charles Beddington At several stages in his career, Canaletto displayed an interest in technical experimentation which enhances even further his stature as an artist over that of any of this contemporaries. In the late 1720s he briefly used copper as a support, and nine paintings on copperplates are known. Similarly, when occupying a studio over a cabinet-maker's during his years in London, on four occasions he painted views on ungrounded mahogany panels. Also during his English period Canaletto replaced his normal use of a russet coloured ground with one of light grey. This desire for new challenges is particularly evident in the 1740s, when, as well as expanding his repertoire to mainland subjects, for a period he showed a notable interest in - and aptitude for - etching. Thus it shoud come as no surprise to find him trying his hand at tempera, a medium in which sush notable results had been achieved by Marco Rici, an artist who had such a strong formative influence on his style. The re-emergence of these two gouaches, which I have studied in the original, brings to six the number of known works in this medium by Canaletto. They are entirely onsistent in handling with the only four works by Canaletto in this medium known hitherto, a group in a private collection, said to be in Milan. All are datable to the 1740s. Those are of very similar dimensions (36.5 x 53.5 cm.), and were similarly unknown until their inclusion in the following exhibitions (on each occasion the entry or entries was by Annalia Delneri): Barcellona, Centre de Cultura Contemporània, Canaletto: Una Vanècia Imaginària, 20 February - 13 May 2001, pp.172-7, nos.67-70, all illustrated in colour. Madrid, Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Canaletto: Una Venecia Imaginaria, 29 May - 2 September 2001, pp.222-7, nos.77-80, all illustrated in colour. Passariano (Udine), Villa Manin, Da Canaletto a Zuccarelli: il paesaggio veneto del Settecento, 8 August - 16 November 2003, pp.384-9, nos.105-8, al illustrated in colour (the illustrations for nos.106-7 switched). Variants of the compositions of three of those were already knoen:of the Tomb by the Lagoon, a closely corresponding painting in the Berlin Gemäldegalerie (W. G. Constable, Canaletto, London, 1962, II, no. 486(b); S. Kozakiewicz, Bernardo Bellotto, Recklinghausen/London, 1972, II, pp.484-5, no. Z391, illustrated) and a varinat in the Uffizzi (Constable no. 486; Kozakiewicz no. Z 390, illustrated); of the Cylindrical Tower near a Bridge by the Lagoon a variant drawing (Constable I, pl.152; II, no. 806); and of the Castle on a Bridge by the Lagoon a closely related painting (Constable I, pl.89, II, no.481). PRints by Fabio Berardi (1728-1788) show the first two compositions, in reverse, the second with variantions. The fourth composition was, however, previously completely unknown. It shows A Ruined Demi-Dome with a Lantern by the Lagoon and suggests, as Delneri has pointed out, That Canaletto here again,as often in the early 1740s, revisited the drawings which he had made in Rome in his youthin 1719-1720, all but one of which were retained in the studio throughout his career. Of the present two gouaches, one, the Chapel on the Side of a Hill, has similarly already been known in variant drawings, one, a compositional sketch in the Schlossmuseum, Weimar (J.G. Links, A Supplement to W.G. Constable's Canaletto, London, 1998, p. 53, no. 805*, pl. 240), the other, far more finished, in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London (Constable I, pl.152, II, no. 805). Those, and a related engraving by Berardi in reverse (Constable I, pl. 152), all show entirely different figures, and part of a carriage at lower left. They do not show the prominent classical architectural fragments in the foreground, and a church and other buildings close the view to the Langoon on the right. There are numerous other minor variations, and none show the pink flag on the belfry of the chapel. A desire to avoid axact exact repetition is characteristic of Canaletto's practise at all stages in his carrer. The other composition, that of the Capriccio of Clasical Ruins with a Man before a Crucifix, is, like the Ruined DEmi-Dome with a Lantern by the Lagoon from the other group, hitherto completely unknown. This too, recalls the early Roman drawings, in this case particularly that of Ruins of a domed Building and a Triumphal Arch recorded in a later drawing at Windsor (Constable I, pl.153, II, no. 815; Kozakiewicz I, illustrated p.226). The lower part of the right side of the composition is the reflected in a drawing by Bellotto in the Hessischen Landesmuseum, Darmstadt, presumably derived from Canaletto, and in an etching (Kozakiewicz nos. 114-115, both illustrated). The attribution has been independently confirmed by Dario Succi from photographs. 25 October 2011
Arcadja LogoServices
Subscription
Advertising
Sponsored Auctions
Subscription

Arcadja
Our Product
Follow Arcadja on Facebook
Follow Arcadja on Twitter
Follow Arcadja on Google+
Follow Arcadja on Pinterest
Follow Arcadja on Tumblr