Jan I Brueghel

Belgium (15681625 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Jan I Brueghel
BRUEGHEL Jan I A Wooded Landscape With A Hermit Monk

Christie's /Jul 5, 2011
136,106.49 - 204,159.73
295,249.78

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Variants on Artist's name :

Breughel Jean Dit De Velours

Bruegel Jan I

Brueghel Jan, The Elder

 

Artworks in Arcadja
221

Some works of Jan I Brueghel

Extracted between 221 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Jan I Brueghel - Still Life With Tulips, Roses And Irises In An Unpainted Clay Vase, And A Brooch, Ring And Beetle On A Ledge

Jan I Brueghel - Still Life With Tulips, Roses And Irises In An Unpainted Clay Vase, And A Brooch, Ring And Beetle On A Ledge

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Lot number: 35
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LOT 35 PROPERTY RESTITUTED TO THE HEIRS OF JULIUS KIEN JAN BRUEGHEL THE ELDER BRUSSELS 1568 - 1625 ANTWERP STILL LIFE WITH TULIPS, ROSES AND IRISES IN AN UNPAINTED CLAY VASE, AND A BROOCH, RING AND BEETLE ON A LEDGE oil on panel, marouflaged 66.2 by 51 cm.; 26 by 20 1/8 in. (69.9 by 51 cm. including its later extension along the upper edge)
Jan I Brueghel - A Study Sheet With Several Figures

Jan I Brueghel - A Study Sheet With Several Figures

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Lot number: 119
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Jan Brueghel the Elder (Brussels 1568-1625 Antwerp) A study sheet with several figures, pen and black ink, grey wash on paper, 21.8 x 20.6 cm, unmounted, unframed, (Sch) Provenance: European private collection. Comparable literature: Klaus Ertz, Jan Brueghel d. Ältere (1568-1625). Die Gemälde mit kritischem Oeuvrekatalog, Köln 1979, p. 511, 542; Teréz Gerszi, Pieter Brueghel der Jüngere - Jan Brueghel der Ältere: Flämische Malerei um 1600: Tradition und Fortschritt, Exh. cat. Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum, 1997, pp. 32-36, William W. Robinson (Ed.), Brueghel to Rembrandt. Dutch and Flemish Drawings from the Maida and George Abrams Collection, Exh. cat. London, 2002-2003, p. 98, Cat.36. The attribtuion of the drawing to Jan Brueghel the elder was confirmed on the basis of a photograph by Klaus Ertz. The spontaneous and seemingky arbitrary arrangement of the figures in the present drawing suggests that the sheet is perhaps a free study of real persons in the daily surrounding of Jan Brueghel, who he could have studied near a market place or a laundry place. While the majority of Brueghel’’’’s drawings is dedicated to the traditional genre landscape, only few figure drawings could hitherto be ascribed to the artist. Until today allegedly only a little more than a dozen of such studies are known. (comp. Robinson 2001, p. 98). The significance and function of these drawings have not yet been sufficiently explained. Brueghel only rarely transferred figures into his paintings, they seem to have served as sample material which he could refer to when needed for staffage figures. The majority of known studies were executed with a combination of pen and bropwn ink and delicate wash with the brush; in rare cases he used solely the pen, as is the case with the present drawing. The sheets are dateableon stylistic grounds to 1600-1620. It is difficult to establish a chronology as they are rarely connected with datable paintings (comp. Gerszi 1997, pp. 32-36). For comparable figure studies by Jan Brueghel see Rijksbureau voor Kunsthistorische Documentatie (RKD) The Hague (Inv. 18808, Inv. 55837, Inv. 56830). Other study sheets are preserved in Stockholm, Nationalmuseum (Inv. NM H 1906/1863), in Rotterdam (Ertz 1979, p. 447, Fig. 542), in Windsor Castle (Ertz 1979, p. 511, Fig. 622). A double-sided drawing with figure studies by Jan Brueghel was sold at Christie's, London, July 6, 2004, lot 163. Specialist: Mag. Astrid Schierz
Jan I Brueghel - The Rape Of Proserpina

Jan I Brueghel - The Rape Of Proserpina

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Lot number: 484
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Jan Brueghel I (Brussels 1568–1625 Antwerp) The Rape of Proserpina, oil on copper, 18.7 x 26 cm, framed Certificate: Dr. Klaus Ertz (August 2011). This well preserved and hitherto unpublished copper panel is an important rediscovery. With its extraordinary compactness and shining colours, endowing the painting with an almost jewel-like nature as an object per se, it is impressive in several respects: besides the brilliant handling of technique, the work also stands out for its masterfully theatrical composition. From a slightly raised vantage point, the spectator overlooks a wooded river landscape. In the focus of the scene are four black horses, racing towards the spectator at a gallop rendered in a dramatic and most virtuoso fashion. They pull the elaborately adorned chariot of Pluto, who holds Proserpina, wrapped in a blue cloth, in his arms. In his Metamorphoses, Ovid relates how Pluto, in the underworld, was worried about the condition of his realm. He consequently mounted his chariot, drawn by four black horses, in order to inspect the foundations of Sicily. On his way there he was spotted by Venus, who, intending to overpower Pluto, sent out Cupid. Pluto, struck by Cupid’’’’s arrow, discovered Proserpina picking flowers; he was overcome by an amorous passion and seized Proserpina to race away with her. Brueghel even remembered a small detail: the nymph Cyane, who was courageous enough to step in Pluto’’’’s way and halt the wheels of his chariot. However, Pluto caused the earth to split open in order to disappear in the underworld with his reluctant bride. Cyane was so disappointed about her failure that she dissolved away in tears, turning into a spring. Brueghel rendered the elegantly meandering streamlet in the left background and the foliage framing the composition with great mastery, doing justice to his nickname, “Velvet Brueghel”. Even the tiniest details reveal the master’’’’s superb skills. For instance, the highlights placed on the leaves in order to brighten their tips and indicate an illumination of the left foreground are facing away from the spectator, so that they are consistently perceived against the light. The three figures are by the hand of Brueghel’’’’s colleague Hendrick van Balen. Around 1600, such precious and exquisitely executed collectibles were in high demand on the expanding European art market. As often holds true for Jan’’’’s oeuvre, there exist two versions of the subject: a slightly altered larger and coarser one on panel (in a German private collection) and the present painting on copper, which is much more delicately rendered. Dr. Ertz dates both this version and the panel into the 1610s (comp. K. Ertz, Jan Brueghel der Ältere, Die Gemälde, Lingen 2008–2011, vol. II, p. 780, no. 388).
Jan I Brueghel - A Wooded Landscape With A Hermit Monk

Jan I Brueghel - A Wooded Landscape With A Hermit Monk

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Lot number: 32
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Jan Brueghel I (Brussels 1568-1625 Antwerp) A wooded landscape with a hermit monk oil on panel, circular 6¾ in. (17.2 cm.) diam. VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price and at 20% on thebuyer's premium. Anonymous sale [The Trustees of Bishop's Court]; Sotheby's,London, 6 March 1957, lot 133, as 'J. Brueghel' (440 guineas toGutz). FROM THE COLLECTION OF MONSIEUR AND MADAME FRANÇOIS K. Ertz, Jan Brueghel der Ältere: Die Gemälde, Lingen,2008-2010, II, pp. 605-7, no. 285*, illustrated, as on copper, 'vonallerbester Qualität um 1600 von Jan d.Ä. geschaffen'. Described recently by Klaus Ertz as a work 'von allerbesterQuälitat um 1600 von Jan d.Ä. geschaffen' (loc. cit.), the presentwork offers a superb example of Jan Breughel the Elder's mostrefined style employed for small-scale landscape painting at theturn of the 16th century. Other examples from the same date, thatadopt the same circular format, include the The Sacrifice of Isaac(Geneva, Musée d'Art et d'Histoire), and the Rest on the Flightinto Egypt (Munich, Alte Pinakothek), both of which, like thisexample, are unsigned and on panel. The meditative theme of thehermit shown in isolation and in harmony with the landscape was asubject treated sporadically throughout the artist's career. Thepresent composition seems, as Ertz has suggested, to have been bornfrom a drawing made by Jan in 1593 (Rotterdam, Museum Boymans vanBeuningen), which shows, in rectangular format, broadly the samearrangement of the landscape elements. This drawing may in turnhave been inspired by an engraving by Hieronymous Cock after PieterBrueghel the Elder (Jan's father), which first adopts this type ofmarshy, wooded setting (for reproductions of both works on paper,see Ertz, loc. cit., p. 607).
Jan I Brueghel - Paradise Landscape With Eve Tempting Adam Eve

Jan I Brueghel - Paradise Landscape With Eve Tempting Adam Eve

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Lot number: 457
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Jan Brueghel I (Brüssel 1568-1625 Antwerpen) Paradise Landscape with Eve Tempting Adam Eve, oil onpanel, 36.5 x 47.5 cm, framed, Provenance: European private collection. Literature: K. Ertz, C.Nitze-Ertz, Jan Brueghel d. Ä., KritischerKatalog der Gemälde, vol. IV, Lingen 2010, add. 17, pp. 1651/52, colourplate. Certificate: Dr Klaus Ertz (2010).This painting, unpublished until recently and privatelyowned, is an important addition to the oeuvre of the elderJan Brueghel. Dr Ertz writes: “In the 1590s, Jan Brueghelthe Elder took to painting his first Paradise landscapes. He thusestablished a genre of its own, which was highlysuccessful particularly in 17th-century Flemish painting and evenamong the artist’’’’’’’’s followers, as we now know…” Theearliest example of this genre, dated 1595, isnow preserved in the Galleria Doria Pamphilj in Rome, anda Paradise Landscape with Noah’’’’’’’’s Ark was made in the followingyear (private collection, Italy). Ertz: “These two earlyParadises are the prototypes, so to speak, forall the subsequent ones: the large apple tree with the two figuresof Adam and Eve, mostly placed at the centre, frequently amidst some landscape scenery; the framing on theside (right or left); the view into the distance, eitherright or left of the tree; the accumulation of animals in theforeground, varying depending on the time when the picturein question was made. The sources for the early animal models areunclear. Jan the Elder must partly have relied on his ownobservations and partly have borrowed from such artists as PeterPaul Rubens or Gonzales Cock…”. Dr Ertz about the dating of ourpainting: “That the painting in question was made at an early dateis illustrated both by the animals, which only occur inthis form in the 1590s, and the two figures. It isgenerally assumed that Sadeler’’’’’’’’s engraving after de Vos servedas a model for the present and subsequent examples.” Ertz comparesour painting with the following works: (1) ParadiseLandscape with the Fall of Man (Staatsgalerie Neuburg an der Donau;which according to Mart dates from 1596 and was done with theparticipation of Hendrick de Clerck); (2) ParadiseLandscape with the Fall of Man (Museo del Prado, Madrid, before 1612, with the participationof Hendrick de Clerck); (3) Paradise Landscape with theFall of Man (French private collection, c. 1612). Dr Ertzabout the figures: “That the figures in the present picture are notby the hand of de Clerck – although they greatly rely on his art –but were probably painted by Jan the Elder himself, issuggested by the evident differences in style; compared to the nudefigues by the Clerck, with their muscular physiques beingaccentuated through light and shadow, they are softer andnot as heavily modelled…” “Now the serpent was more subtlethan any beast of the field which the Lord God had made. And hesaid to the woman, Yea, hath God said, Ye shall not eat of every tree of the garden? And the womansaid unto the serpent, We may eat of the fruit of thetrees of the garden: But of the fruit of the tree which is in themidst of the garden, God hath said, Ye shall noteat of it, neither shall ye touch it, lest yedie. And the serpent said unto the woman, Ye shall notsurely die: For God doth know that in the day ye eat thereof, then your eyes shall be opened, and ye shall be asgods, knowing good and evil. And when the woman saw thatthe tree was good for food, and that it was pleasant tothe eyes, and a tree to be desired to make one wise, she took of the fruit thereof, and did eat, and gave also unto her husband with her; and he did eat. Andthe eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that theywere naked…” (Genesis 3:1– 7). Specialist: Dr. Alexander Strasoldo
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