Jan I Brueghel

Belgium (15681625 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Jan I Brueghel
BRUEGHEL Jan I Paradise Landscape With The Animals Entering Noah's Ark

Sotheby's /Jan 29, 2015
2,596,246.57 - 3,338,031.30
2,947,171.40

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Variants on Artist's name :

Breughel Jean Dit De Velours

Bruegel Jan I

Brueghel Jan, The Elder

 

Artworks in Arcadja
250

Some works of Jan I Brueghel

Extracted between 250 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Jan I Brueghel - The Deer Park Of The Château Of Mariemont

Jan I Brueghel - The Deer Park Of The Château Of Mariemont

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Lot number: 136
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Lot Description Jan Brueghel the Elder (Brussels 1568-1625 Antwerp) The deer park of the Château of Mariemont with inscription '3697 / cad. Gercherain (?) X' (verso) pen and brown ink, brown, green, and blue wash, brown ink framing lines 21.2 x 24.6 cm. Lot Condition Report I confirm that I have read this Important Notice and agree to its terms. View Condition Report Provenance Emile Calando (1840-1899) (L. 837), with his inscription '1928B' and '1193-6', by descent to Emile Calando jr. (d. 1953); Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 17-18 March 1927, lot 179 ('Genre de Gillis Neyts, Le parc aux biches, plume et aquarelle, monture ancienne, 213 x 245'; sold for 150 francs to an anonymous buyer). possibly with Hevesi, Vienna; from whom purchased by I.Q. van Regteren Altena in December 1929 for 100 guilders (Inventory book: 't. 844. Brueghel en Claude landschap'). Literature E. Haverkamp Begemann and A.M.S. Logan, European Drawings and Watercolours in the Yale University Art Gallery 1500-1900, New Haven and London, 1970, I, p. 286, under no. 524, note 2. M. Winner, 'Neubestimmtes und Unbestimmtes im zeichnerischen Werk von Jan Breughel d. Ä', Jahrbuch der Berliner Museen, XIV, 1972, pp. 155-157, pl. 35. K. Ertz, Jan Brueghel der Ältere (1568-1625): Kritischer Katalog der Gemälde, Lingen, 2010, III, p. 1220, under no. 563, fig. 563/1. Exhibited Rotterdam, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Paris, Fondation Custodia, and Brussels, Bibliothèque Albert 1er, Le Cabinet d'un Amateur: Dessins flamands et hollandais des XVIe et XVIIe siècles d'une collection privée d'Amsterdam, 1976-77, no. 35, pl. 102 (catalogue by J. Giltaij). View Lot Notes >
Jan I Brueghel - Woodland Road With Wagon And Travelers

Jan I Brueghel - Woodland Road With Wagon And Travelers

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Lot number: 27
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Jan Brueghel the Elder BRUSSELS 1568 - 1625 ANTWERP WOODLAND ROAD WITH WAGON AND TRAVELERS signed and dated lower left: BRVEGHE[L]/160(9?) oil on copper, mounted on panel 3 5/8 by 5 7/8 in.; 9.2 by 14.9 cm. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Possibly Major Allnutt, Clapham Common, London; His deceased sale, London, Christie’’s, 18-20 June 1863, lot 338 (described as Brueghel, A Landscape, with post-wagons and figures on a road, for 2.15.0 guineas); or lot 395 (described as Brueghel, A Landscape, with figures and post-wagons, for 3.10.0 guineas to Naters (?); Miss Grace Shearer, 1987; Thence by inheritance until sold anonymously, (“ Property of a Lady” ), London, Christie’’s, 10 April 1987, lot 20; David Koetser, 1992. Exhibited New Orleans 1997, no. 11; Baltimore 1999, no. 9. Literature New Orleans 1997, pp. 26-28, cat. no. 11, reproduced; Baltimore 1999, pp. 21-23, cat. no. 9, reproduced; K. Ertz, Jan Brueghel der Ältere (1568-1625), Kritischer Katalog der Gemälde, vol. I, Lingen 2008, p. 184, cat. no. 70, reproduced p. 185 (as dated 160[9]).
Jan I Brueghel - Rest By A Windmill

Jan I Brueghel - Rest By A Windmill

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Lot number: 53
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Jan Brueghel I (Brussels 1568–1625 Antwerp) Rest by a Windmill, oil on panel, 36.2 x 48.9 cm, framed Provenance: Sale Ader, Picard, Tajan, Paris, 14 April 1989, lot 242 (as Jan Brueghel II); Galerie d’’’’Art Saint Honoré, Paris (1990); Sale Sotheby’’’’s, New York, 17 January 1992, lot 32; Sale Christie’’’’s, New York, 26 January 2011, lot 23 Literature: K. Ertz, C. Nitze-Ertz, Jan Brueghel der Ältere, Die Gemälde, vol. I, Lingen, 2008, p. 326, no. 156 In his monograph on Jan Brueghel I, Klaus Ertz writes about the present painting: ‘Jan Brueghel the Elder seems to have painted this previously unknown version of the subject around the same year as the two variants Broad Landscape with Windmills in Munich (cat. 155) and Dresden (cat. 163), both of which date from 1611. Similar to the Munich version, the painter explicitly concentrated on the atmospheric mood expressed by effects of light and dark in the sky, which are also reflected on the earth. Jan had used the motif in the right foreground of the peasant in a red doublet bridling a horse two years earlier in the composition Resting at the Mill (cat. 154). ’’’’In his certificate of 1990, Ertz commented upon the present painting: ‘The painting can be said to be excellently preserved. The paint layers, applied in overlapping, transparent glazes – a method typical of Jan Brueghel the Elder – thus lending the scene its peculiar three-dimensionality, have survived in perfect condition. The unmistakable jewel-like colours glow in a way I only know from the master’’’’s originals. I could not detect any retouches or overpainting […].’’’’ Ertz continues: ‘The stylistic features typical of this artist can also be found in the present painting: The overall impression achieved by the handling of the colours – one of the most important criteria in the identification of works by the hand of Jan the Elder – entirely complies with the characteristic pattern of Brueghel’’’’s “wide landscapes” from his later period. Foreground, middle ground, and background seamlessly blend in with each other. The division into the three colour zones of brown, green, and blue and the staggered planes of earlier compositions have given way here to a holistic perception of space and colour. However, the brushwork is still extremely delicate. Tracing each and every form with painstaking meticulousness and technical brilliance, Jan Brueghel the Elder has created here an almost unsurpassable small masterpiece of supreme quality in terms of both technique and artistic invention. Although Jan I treated the motif of the “broad landscape with windmills” in several variants, each of them is a fantastic and technically accomplished little masterpiece in its own right that exemplifies Flemish painting during the early 17th century.’’’’ In order to corroborate his attribution and the present painting’’’’s date of origin in the first decade of the 17th century, Ertz compares it to the following secure works by Jan Brueghel the Elder: (1) Country Road with Windmills (Palazzo Spada, Rome, inv. no. 138, signed and dated 1607); (2) Wide Plain with Windmills (Staatliches Museum, Schwerin, inv. no. 138. G 23, c. 1607); (3) Broad Landscape with Windmills (Alte Pinakothek, Munich, inv. no. 1892, signed and dated 1611); (4) Broad Landscape with Windmills (Gemäldegalerie, Dresden, inv. no. 886, war loss, signed and dated 1611) Klaus Ertz concludes: ‘All of the paintings mentioned belong to the same type of “broad landscape” as the one to be assessed here. The beholder’’’’s eye glides across the picture without being “arrested”. Horizontals dominate over verticals, and there is only the separation between “sky and earth” . These paintings present themselves to us as flat landscapes in their purest form, which later culminated in the monochrome flat landscapes of Jan van Goyen or Salomon van Ruysdael in the Netherlands. Hence Jan Brueghel the Elder is the inventor proper of the flat landscape, regardless of the small size of his pictures, which were nevertheless seminal for the development of landscape painting. This underscores the artist’’’’ s significance for art history, as well as that of the painting in question.’’’’
Jan I Brueghel - Paradise Landscape With The Animals Entering Noah's Ark

Jan I Brueghel - Paradise Landscape With The Animals Entering Noah's Ark

Original 1596
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Lot number: 54
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Jan Brueghel the Elder BRUSSELS 1568 - 1625 ANTWERP PARADISE LANDSCAPE WITH THE ANIMALS ENTERING NOAH'S ARK signed and dated lower left: BRVEGHEL 1596 also signed or inscribed by scratching into the copper on the reverse of the plate: 1596/Brueghel oil on copper 10 3/8 by 14 in.; 26.5 by 35.6 cm. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Acquired by the father of the present owner in Milan in the 1950s; Thence by descent to the present owner. Exhibited Antwerp, Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Pieter Breughel le Jeune (1564-1637/8) – Jan Brueghel l'Ancien (1568-1625): Une famille des peintres flamands vers 1600, 3 May - 26 July 1998, no. 35. Literature K. Ertz, in Pieter Breughel le Jeune (1564-1637/8) –Jan Brueghel l'Ancien (1568-1625): Une famille des peintres flamands vers 1600, exhibition catalogue, Antwerp 1998, pp. 124-126, no. 35, reproduced p. 127. K. Ertz and C. Nitze-Ertz, Jan Brueghel der Ältere (1568-1625), Kritische Katalog der Gemälde, Lingen 2008-2010, vol. II, p. 454, no. 196, reproduced p. 455. This highly finished and beautifully preserved copper is an important and rare work from very early in Jan Brueghel’’s career, dating to just before his return to Flanders from Italy. It is one of the artist's earliest "Paradise landscapes," and one of the finest examples of a genre that he was to pursue throughout his career. Very much a product of his sojourn in Italy, it is a combines Italian theology with the northern landscape tradition, and the result is a delightful interpretation of this Old Testament subject. The present work is, in fact, Brueghel’’s first known painting in which he sets the scene from Genesis 7:1-4, in which the animals are called to Noah's ark in an Eden-like paradise. It is dated 1596, so he either painted it while in Milan with his patron Cardinal Federico Borromeo, or shortly after on his return to Antwerp in October of that year. As the work comes from a Milanese collection, it is most likely that Brueghel painted it in Italy and left it there when he returned to the Netherlands. In depicting the plenitude and beauty of God’’s creation with such evident delight, he marries the Cardinal’’s religious views to his own artistic preferences and in doing so creaties a painting of beguiling charm and beauty. While the concept of God revealing himself through his natural creations can been seen in the Kunst- and Wunderkammer of Northern Europe, and indeed in the paintings of Jan’’s father Pieter Bruegel the Elder, it was in Italy that the younger artist’’s religious outlook was molded. He stayed with Cardinal Borromeo in Rome and Milan from 1592 to 1596, and his time there had a profound effect on him for his entire career and on the development of the paradise landscape itself. Borromeo was steeped in the teaching of the Counter-Reformation whereby all of God's creation had value and was worthy of contemplation and he, himself, particularly emphasized the beauty and diversity of the animal world. 1 In I tre libri delle laudi divine (published only posthumously in 1632) he writes: “Looking then with attentive study at animals’’ construction and formation, and at their parts, members, and characters, can it not be said how excellently divine wisdom has demonstrated the value of its great works?” 2 What Borromeo describes in words, Brueghel does so here in oil on copper. He lovingly depicts the variety of creatures waiting to enter the ark, though contrary to the Biblical story in only a few cases are they in pairs. He is mainly concerned with presenting the animals from a characteristic viewpoint so as to be easily identified; thus two delightful peacock-like birds float in the sky as if the wind under their exotic tails were keeping them aloft rather than their wings. The lion and leopard are each in profile, perhaps to clearly distinguish one from another, and a doe and stag are pictured with their heads turned in so that the male's antlers can be clearly seen. In the lower left corner, closest to the viewer, is a lovely dapple grey horse who, for some reason, has his tongue sticking out. Brueghel painted the present work only two years after his very first Paradise Landscape, now in the Doria Pamphilij, Rome. That picture incorporates a small vignette with the Creation of Man in the background, but the main focus is on the animals and the landscape itself. The earlier painting is organized around a large tree filled with birds at the center of the composition, while in the present work a similar tree is moved to the right to create a path for the animals waiting to enter the ark. The overall structure of both paintings, with their relatively high point of view and aerial perspective is still grounded in the 16 th century Flemish model, though in later paintings the artist evolved a more naturalistic approach to the landscape. In the middle distance of the present work members of Noah’’s family dressed, in vaguely biblical clothes, are walking toward the ark accompanied by some of their domestic animals. In the background are scenes of villagers eating and dancing, presumably part of the population of sinners about to be lost in the coming flood. However, they are in 16 th century dress and are set in what appears to be a contemporary village. This combination of biblical subjects with scenes taken from contemporary Flemish life is one of the most characteristic elements of Brueghel’’s composition and can be seen in his work throughout his entire career. So, too, is his combining of events taking place at different times into a single composition: here pairing a scene from Paradise with Noah’’s ark. The Paradise Landscape was to be one of Brueghel’’s favored subjects earning him the nickname Paradise Brueghel. He continued refining his treatment of the subject throughout his career, but this early example with its gentle touch and somewhat whimsically depicted animals is among the finest examples of his artistry. 1. A.F. Kolb, Jan Brueghel the Elder: The Entry of Noah’’s Animals into the Ark, Los Angeles 2005, p. 50. 2. Ibid. p. 51.
Jan I Brueghel - Allegory Of Water

Jan I Brueghel - Allegory Of Water

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Lot number: 151
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Lot Description Jan Bruegel the Elder (Brussels 1568-1625 Antwerp) Allegory of Water traces of black chalk, pen and brown ink, black ink framing lines, watermark posthorn (?) 7 1/8 x 11½ in. (17.9 x 28.9 cm.) Literature M. Winner, 'Neubestimmtes und Unbestimmtes im zeichnerischen Werk von Jan Brueghel d. Ä', Jahrbuch der Berliner Museen, XIV, 1972, p. 142, pl. 21. K. Ertz, Jan Brueghel der Ältere (1568-1625): Die Gemälde mit kritischem Oeuvrekatalog, Cologne, 1979, p. 607, under no. 302. K. Ertz and C. Nitze-Ertz, Jan Brueghel der Ältere (1568-1625): Kritischer Katalog der Gemälde, Lingen, 2008-10, III, 'Blumen, Allegorien, Historie, Genre, Gemäldeskizzen', p. 1050, fig. 499/1. Exhibited Brussels, Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brueghel. Une dynastie de peintres, 1980, no. 164 (catalogue entry by M. Winner). View Lot Notes >
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