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Jan I Brueghel

Belgium (1568 -  1625 ) Wikipedia® : Jan I Brueghel
BRUEGHEL Jan I Canal Landscape With Two Workshops At The Banks

Palais Dorotheum /Oct 20, 2015
300,000.00 - 400,000.00
369,000.00

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Variants on Artist's name :

Breughel Jean Dit De Velours

Bruegel Jan I

Brueghel Jan, The Elder

 

Artworks in Arcadja
280

Some works of Jan I Brueghel

Extracted between 280 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Jan I Brueghel - The Temptation Of Saint Anthony

Jan I Brueghel - The Temptation Of Saint Anthony

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 67
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Jan Brueghel I (Brussels 1568–1625 Antwerp)The Temptation of Saint Anthony,oil on panel, 14 x 23,6 cm, framed Provenance:Private collection, BelgiumWe are grateful to Klaus Ertz for confirming the authenticity ofthe present painting. A written certificate, dated 23 December2015, is available.Ertz dates the present painting to around 1595, Brueghel’’’’s Italianperiod. He writes: ‘In his early years, Jan Brueghel the Elder hadalready dealt with the subject of Saint Anthony in severalversions, including one dated from around 1595 and a second, whichis preserved in Dresden and was painted ten years later (see K.Ertz/Ch. Nitze-Ertz, Jan Brueghel der Ältere, Lingen, 2008–10, vol.II, pp. 616-623, cat. nos. 293 and 295). In all of these versions,the artist invented the infernal landscape. The motif of the Templeof the Tiburtine Sibyl near Rome, which the artist frequently usedat the time, also speaks in favour of this early date of execution.It is typical of Jan Brueghel the Elder that he treated a theme ina version on copper and slightly varied it on panel. Probably thepresent little panel is one of the earliest versions of the subjecton which the Dresden painting is based. In all of his compositionsdevoted to the theme of Saint Anthony, it seems to have beenunthinkable for Jan the Elder to set the scene of the temptation indifferent surroundings, such as in an intimate forest. The presentcomposition thus proves a theory frequently voiced in this context,namely that Jan the Elder, as soon as he had chosen a compositionaltype for a certain subject, would remain true to it.’’’’In his monograph on Jan Brueghel the Elder, Ertz comments uponBrueghel’’’’s special iconography for the subject: ‘With suchinfernal landscapes, Jan Brueghel the Elder presents himself as ahighly typical exponent of Mannerist painting around 1600. AFleming, he particularly adopted the theme of monsters and spookyand fantastic creatures that had been introduced by HieronymusBosch and which in Brueghel’’’’s art culminated in a genre of its ownright. It goes without saying that he was also influenced by thespectres in the art of his father, such as those encountered in theFall of the Rebel Angels in Brussels. In literature and general artjargon, the name ‘Hell Brueghel’’’’ is often wrongly used as asynonym for landscapes ravaged by fire or illuminated by lightningand populated by fantastic and eerie creatures, the darknessfrequently being torn apart by dazzling lights. However, thisnickname has always been associated with one of the two Pieters andespecially became a rigid formula for Jan’’’’s brother, although ithas meanwhile turned out that Pieter the Younger did not paint asingle so called infernal landscape.’’’’
Jan I Brueghel - Hans Efterföljd

Jan I Brueghel - Hans Efterföljd

Original -
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Price:

Lot number: 278
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Jan Brueghel I Flanders 1568‑1625. Hans efterföljd, 1600-tal. Väderkvarnar i holländskt landskap. Olja på koppar. 11 x 14. Jan Brueghel I Flanders 1568‑1625. Hans efterföljd, 1600-tal. Väderkvarnar i holländskt landskap. Olja på koppar. 11 x 14. Follower of, 17th century. Wind mills in a Dutch landscape. Oil on copper, 11 x 14 cm. Färgbortfall, i hörnen samt längs marginal under figurerna. Smärre fläckar. Retuscher vid boskapen. Kopparplåt med smärre buckla vid nedre marginal. Rammått: 15 x 18. Paintloss, in the corners and along the margin under the figures. Minor spots. Retouches by the cattle. The copper plate with minor buckle in the lower margin. Frame size: 15 x 18 cm.
Jan I Brueghel - Panoramic Landscape With Travellers With Horses Carts And Cattle On A Sandy Road

Jan I Brueghel - Panoramic Landscape With Travellers With Horses Carts And Cattle On A Sandy Road

Original -
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Lot number: 31
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Jan Brueghel the Elder BRUSSELS 1568 - 1625 ANTWERP PANORAMIC LANDSCAPE WITH TRAVELLERS WITH HORSES CARTS AND CATTLE ON A SANDY ROAD signed and indistinctly dated lower right: BRUEGHEL 1*** oil on copper 22.2 by 33 cm.; 8 3/4 by 13 in. Exhibited New York, Bob P. Haboldt, Fifty Paintings by Old Masters, 1995, no. 12; Essen, Villa Hügel; Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Pieter Brueghel der Jüngere–Jan Breughel der Ältere, 26 August 1997–14 April 1998, no. 66; Phoenix, Art Museum; Kansas City, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art; The Hague, Mauritshuis, Copper as Canvas: Two Centuries of Masterpiece Painting on Copper, 1575–1775, 19 December 1998–22 August 1999, under no.8. Literature K. Ertz, Breughel - Brueghel, exhibition catalogue, Lingen 1997, pp. 235–237, cat. no. 66, reproduced p. 236; M.K. Komanecky, in Copper as Canvas: Two Centuries of Masterpiece Paintings on Copper, 1575–1775, exhibition catalogue, New York 1998, pp. 150–54, part of section 8, reproduced p. 154; K. Ertz and C. Nitze-Ertz, Jan Brueghel der Ältere (1568– 1625). Kritischer Katalog der Gemälde, vol. I, Landschaften mit profanen Themen, Lingen 2008, pp. 150–52, cat. no. 49, reproduced p. 151, fig. 49.
Jan I Brueghel - Canal Landscape With Two Workshops At The Banks

Jan I Brueghel - Canal Landscape With Two Workshops At The Banks

Original 1603
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Net Price
Lot number: 35
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Description:
Fullsize picture Jan Brueghel I. (Brussels 1568–1625 Antwerp) Canal landscape with two workshops at the banks fragments of a signature at lower left: B.... HEL 1.0., oil on copper, 17.5 x 22.5 cm, framed With the brand of the plate maker Peeter Stas (active between 1587 and 1610) on the reverse. We are grateful to Klaus Ertz for confirming the attribution after examination of the painting in the original (written communication, March 2015). Ertz writes: “The present painting can be said to have survived in good condition. The paints, applied in the impasto technique, still give a jewel-like and brilliant impression, while the overlapping, translucent glazes are excellently preserved. The copper plate is one of the thick and heavy types produced in the early 17th century […]. When compared to the ‘world landscapes’’’’ of the 16th century, the approach to reality in the present picture has fundamentally changed. Different from the art of Pieter Brueghel the Elder, for example, here the beholder no longer looks down on a scene set far below, but metaphorically speaking almost enters the picture’’’’s space. Nevertheless Jan Brueghel the Elder maintains the distance between the spectator and the composition by still choosing a slightly raised vantage point. At the same time, the artist ‘narrates’’’’ episodes from contemporary everyday village life, such as the conversation between villagers, animals moving about freely, figures attending to horses, and the loading and unloading of barges. These ‘story-telling’’’’ village landscapes number among the artist’’’’s most advanced and pioneering compositions, which he started tackling around 1605. They can generally be assigned to the genre of ‘village scenes by a river’’’’, which involves the peculiar combination of two themes of landscape painting that also existed individually: the village landscape and the river landscape. In this painting, the 16th century’’’’s rigid division into the three colours of brown, green, and blue has been entirely overcome. Spatial depth is now merely accentuated by zones of light and shade and, of course, by the canal, which orthogonally extends into the background. Foreground, midground, and background seamlessly blend into one another.” Ertz compares the present painting to the following works by Jan Brueghel I, all of which are closely related to it in terms of composition and painterly handling: 1. Village Scene with a Forge (Pushkin Museum, Moscow, signed and dated 1603); 2. Village Road (Alte Pinakothek, Munich, signed and dated 1610); 3. Village Landscape with a Canal (Pinacoteca di Brera, Milan, signed and dated 16.7); 4. Village Road with a Canal (private collection, signed and dated 1609) Ertz continues: “Like the present painting, the works by Jan Brueghel the Elder mentioned above belong to the landscape type of ‘wide river landscape’’’’. The beholder’’’’s eye wanders across the picture and its spatiality as a whole without ‘getting stuck’’’’. Horizontals dominate over verticals, although the row of houses on the right-hand side still betrays vertical tendencies, which would play a role in the painter’’’’s work throughout his career as a formal and compositional means to organise the two-dimensional surface of the picture. In terms of chronology, the painting to be assessed here must be assigned to approximately the period in which the comparative examples mentioned above were made. Given the development of Flemish landscape painting in general and the similarities between the aforementioned compositions and the present painting in particular, the latter seems to date from the mid-1610s.” A slightly different copy of the present composition by the hand of a follower of Jan Brueghel I was sold at the Vienna Dorotheum on 24 June 2015 as lot 20. The present picture probably shows a reloading point on the Herenstals canal in the surroundings of Antwerp. We can see so-called “hessenwagens”, coaches drawn by six or eight horses, by which goods were shipped from Antwerp to Southern Germany and Italy. Specialist: Alexander Strasoldo
Jan I Brueghel - The Vision Of Saint Hubert

Jan I Brueghel - The Vision Of Saint Hubert

Original
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Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 43
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Jan Brueghel the Elder BRUSSELS 1568 - 1625 ANTWERP THE VISION OF SAINT HUBERT oil on copper 20.1 by 23.5 cm.; 7 7/8 by 9 1/4 in. Provenance The Vischer-Sarasin family, Basel; The Estate of Maria Sarasin, 1908, according to a label on the reverse; Anonymous sale, Zurich, Koller, 18 March 2008, lot 3029, where acquired by the present owner. Literature K. Ertz, Jan Brueghel der Ältere (1568–1625), Lingen 2008–10, vol. II, pp. 634–36, no. 303, reproduced. Catalogue Note Klaus Ertz dates this painting to the beginning of the 1590s, when Brueghel was in Rome, although he raises the possibility that it might have been painted slightly earlier, just before the artist left Flanders. The luminous handling of the foliage and the tree trunk is however entirely consistent with Brueghel's work in Rome in the early 1590s. The influence of Gillis van Coninxloo's forest landscapes is palpable in this and Brueghel's other woodland settings. Brueghel may have met Coninxloo in Frankenthal when he was en route from Antwerp to Italy. In many of Jan Brueghel's narrative subjects set in wooded landscapes from later in the 1590, the figures are painted by other artists, for example Hans Rottenhammer, with whom Brueghel worked from about 1595 onwards, but at the start of the decade he had yet to develop contacts with such collaborators. The wooded landscape and the foliage in the present work, as well as the figure type and the hound are notably similar to other early wooded landscapes with hunting scenes on copper, such as the one in Schloss Ambras, Innsbruck, a wooded landscape with a stag hunt dated by Ertz circa 1593. Saint Hubert, Bishop of Maastricht and later Liège in the early eighth century, had in his younger days been confronted by a stag with a crucifix between its antlers while out hunting. This brought about his conversion to Christianity. He is patron saint of hunters, and as here is clad in hunter's clothes. The subject is very similar to the Vision of Saint Eustace, but the latter is generally shown wearing armour. 1.Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum (inv. no. 458), on long-term loan to Schloss Ambras; see K. Ertz, Jan Brueghel der Ältere 1569-1625, vol. I, Lingen 2008, p. 194, no. 75, reproduced. For autograph variants also dated by Ertz to the same period, see pp. 196-202, nos. 77 - 80, all reproduced.
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