Frederick Brown

(18511941 ) - Artworks
BROWN Frederick An Impromptu Dance: A Scene On The Chelsea Embankment

Sotheby's /Nov 14, 2006
103,542.63 - 147,918.04
207,807.58

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Artworks in Arcadja
12

Some works of Frederick Brown

Extracted between 12 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Frederick Brown - Grandma's Comfort

Frederick Brown - Grandma's Comfort

Original 1883
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Gross Price
Lot number: 63
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Frederick Brown (1851-1941) Grandma's Comfort signed and dated 'FRED BROWN/1883' (lower right) and signed and dated again 'FRED BROWN 73 EDITH GROVE LONDON/SW/Aug 1883' (on the reverse) oil on canvas 26 x 19 in. (66 x 48 cm.) Anonymous sale; Louis Taylor Auctions, Stoke-on-Trent, 17 March 2009. Anonymous sale; Sotheby's, London, 15 July 2009, lot 64. In June 1883 two men boarded a train from Dieppe to Paris and in the course of conversation discovered that they were both art students. One was the Canadian painter, William Brymner, and the other, 'a very nice sort of a fellow 31 years of age and very easy to get on with', Fred Brown. From his letters to his parents we learn that the two quickly became friends. Brown, the more experienced, had recently shown An Impromptu Dance, a picture of children dancing to the music of a street organ, at the Royal Academy, and he was now bound for further study at the Atelier Julian. But before the rentrée, he and Brymner would spend two months together, painting en plein air in the French countryside. They resolved to explore Burgundy and in the third week of July settled in the village of Pontaubert. By mid-August, Brymner was reporting to his father that Brown and he had found local models and were painting, 'an old woman called Mariana [who] tells us very often that she is trop veille [sic] 86. She is bent nearly double. All the old women are frightfully bent. I think it must be the result of carrying such heavy loads in a basket they strap round their shoulders' (letter dated 13 August 1883). This woman can now be identified as that in the present picture. Brown, like his mentor George Clausen, was clearly impressed by the work of Bastien-Lepage and may have been thinking of the theme of youth and age when he painted the picture of Mariana passing on an old doll to her granddaughter as 'Grandma's gift'. There was no searching for superficial prettiness with the model - but great tenderness in the relationship established between her and the child by her side. She is dressed in 'the sabots and blue dresses and aprons' that peasants in the region wore on weekdays, and which, according to Brymner, 'look at home and right'. The two, joined by Clausen, were back in Paris by the end of September and by the following summer, Brown had returned to London to resume his evening classes at the Westminster School of Art where he had been teaching since 1877. He became a founding member of the New English Art Club in 1886 and a 'London Impressionist' in 1889, by which time Brymner and he were no longer in contact. He succeeded Alphonse Legros as Professor at the Slade School of Fine Art in 1892, where he quickly appointed Philip Wilson Steer and Henry Tonks. The present canvas is however, important evidence of his early days when the values of naturalistic reporting were much to the fore.
Frederick Brown - Little Miss Prim

Frederick Brown - Little Miss Prim

Original 1886
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Gross Price
Lot number: 62
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
LOT 62 FREDERICK BROWN 1851-1941 LITTLE MISS PRIM 6,000—8,000 GBP measurements note 54 by 39cm., 21 by 15 1/2 in. DESCRIPTION signed and dated l.l.: F. BROWN/ JUNE 86; inscribed and signed on the reverse: NO1. LITTLE MISS PRIM/ F. BROWN/ PARK LODGE/ CHELSEA/ SW oil on canvas
Frederick Brown - Louis Armstrong

Frederick Brown - Louis Armstrong

Original -
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Net Price
Lot number: 210
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
FREDERICK BROWN (1945 - ) Louis Armstrong . Color screenprint, 1989-90. 1090x940 mm; 43x37 inches, fullmargins. Signed and numbered 12/99 in pencil, lower right. Printedby Kim Francis, Los Angeles. A very good impression of this largeprint with strong colors. Frederick Brown is a painter and printmaker whose large portraitscelebrate urban heroes such as jazz legends as Louis Armstrong,Billie Holiday and Bessie Smith. In the summer of 2002, the KemperMuseum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City had an exhibit of 30 ofthese paintings curated by Lowery Sims, director of the StudioMuseum in Harlem. In 1988 Brown became the first Western artist tohave a solo show at the National Museum of the Chinese Revolutionin Beijing. He is an artist in residence at the Kemper Museum ofContemporary Art in Kansas City, MO. Estimate $3,000-5,000
Frederick Brown - An Impromptu Dance: A Scene On The Chelsea Embankment

Frederick Brown - An Impromptu Dance: A Scene On The Chelsea Embankment

Original 1883
Estimate:

Price:

Net Price
Lot number: 189
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Professor Frederick Brown, NEAC (British 1851-1941)
An impromptu dance: a scene on the Chelsea Embankment
signed and dated 'Fred Brown/1883' (lower right)
oil on canvas
106 x 153 cm. (41 3/4 x 60 in.)

Additional Notes:
Provenance:
bought directly from the artist by James Hall Renton, on his death;
Christie, Manson & Woods, April 30th, 1898, lot 64, sold for £73-10-0, purchased by Thos. Agnew & Sons on behalf of the Reverend Carrington;
thence by descent to the present owner.

Exhibited:
Royal Academy, 1883, no. 834.

Frederick Brown was born in Chelmsford in 1851. From 1868-1877 he studied at the National Art Training School (later the Royal College of Art), where he grew to resent the mechanical teaching methods then prevalent in Britain. He subsequently became a successful art teacher himself, first at the Westminster School of Art (1877-92) and later at the Slade in direct succession to Alphonse Legros, from 1893-1918. Much inspired by Legros?s reforms at the Slade, Brown encouraged his students to develop their own individual style. It is hardly surprising that Brown should have become a founder of the New English Art Club in 1886, and author of its constitution, establishing a group of discontented artists who favoured the naturalism and spontaneity of plein-air painting over the conservatism of the Royal Academy in particular and the Academic tradition in general and which included such luminaries as Harold Gilman, Roger Fry, William Rothenstein, John Lavery, Water Sickert, Philip Wilson Steer and John Singer Sargent among its members.

As a painter of landscape and genre, it was Brown?s training in Paris at the Academie Julian in 1883 and in particular the work of the French realist, Jules Bastien-Lepage (1848-1884 ) which was to influence his future output.

Frederick Brown exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1879 at which time he was living in Bramerton Street in Chelsea, moving to Edith Grove by 1882, the year before An impromptu dance was exhibited. It was during the 19th and early 20th Centuries that many artists had established their studios in Chelsea, particularly towards the end of the 1870s when sites for building along the newly-created Chelsea Embankment and the surrounding areas became available. The setting for An impromptu dance is the Chelsea Embankment, an area with which Brown would have been very familiar. Brown has depicted a charming and spontaneous scene on this most lively stretch of the Thames;
an organ grinder stands observed by two young boys, fascinated by his art, while two young women dance to his merry tune and two small girls hitch up their skirts to join in the excitement of the dance. Two young mothers and a merchant cease their activities as they turn to delight in the spontaneity of the moment, while a policeman strolls cheerily towards the group. In An impromptu dance Brown has offered the spectator a glimpse into this lively corner of London, imbuing the figures with great pathos as they take up the spontaneous dance in their simple dress.