Elizabeth-Jeanne Bouguereau

United States (18371922 ) - Artworks
BOUGUEREAU Elizabeth-Jeanne The Farmer's Daughter

Sotheby's /Apr 23, 2010
149,925.04 - 224,887.56
371,517.85

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Variants on Artist's name :

Gardner Elisabeth-Jeanne

 

Along with Elizabeth-Jeanne Bouguereau, our clients also searched for the following authors:
Jacob Johan Silvén, Gaston La Touche, Narcisse Virgile Diaz De La Pena, Alfred James Munnings, Joseph Bail, Rosa Bonheur, Auguste Toulmouche
Artworks in Arcadja
12

Some works of Elizabeth-Jeanne Bouguereau

Extracted between 12 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Elizabeth-Jeanne Bouguereau - By The Seaside

Elizabeth-Jeanne Bouguereau - By The Seaside

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Lot number: 14
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Elizabeth Jane Gardner Bouguereau 1837 - 1922 AMERICAN BY THE SEASIDE signed Elizabeth Gardner (lower left) oil on canvas 21 1/2 by 16 1/2 in. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Authentication We thank Charles Pearo for his assistance in cataloguing this work. Mr. Pearo is currently preparing the forthcoming Elizabeth Jane Gardner Bouguereau catalogue raisonné. Provenance Sale: Christie's, London, 1928, March 12, 1928, lot 92 Private Collection (acquired at the above sale) Thence by descent (and sold, Bukowskis, Stockholm, May 30, 2006, lot 0297A, illustrated) Acquired at the above sale by the present owner The present work is a smaller version of Gardner’’s By the Seaside, exhibited at the Paris Salon of 1912 and now held by the Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, Nebraska. Though by this time married to William Bouguereau, the artist signs the present work with her maiden name suggesting it may have been painted on informal request (versus the use of her full name reserved for professional commissions). The stamp of L. Aube is clearly visible on the work’’s reverse; the art supplier was located around the corner from the Bouguereaus' Paris home on La rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs.
Elizabeth-Jeanne Bouguereau - Moses In The Bulrushes

Elizabeth-Jeanne Bouguereau - Moses In The Bulrushes

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Lot number: 31
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Elizabeth Jane Gardner Bouguereau (American, 1851-1922) Moses in the Bulrushes signed 'Elizabeth Gardner' (lower right) oil on canvas 49¼ x 34¾ in. (125 x 88.2 cm.) Westerly Memorial Library Association, Westerly, Rhode Island. Their sale; Sotheby Parke Bernet, New York, 7 October 1977, lot 217. with Irvin Brenner Galleries, Ltd., New York. New York Times, 'Famous Painters to be Married', 8 June 1896. M. Fidell-Beaufort, 'Elizabeth Jane Gardner Bouguereau: A Parisian Artist from New Hampshire', Archives of American Art Journal, vol. 24, no. 2, 1984, p. 6. Paris, Salon, 1878, no. 973. As an academic painter and salon artist, Elizabeth Jane Gardner had one of the longest expatriate careers of any American artist living in Paris. Not having the independent means to fund her training in the capital, she initially made her living by doing portraits and painting copies of famous works. With time, arduous study and hard work, she became one of the earliest examples, in American art, of a woman artist living entirely off the sale of her work. Her personal and professional relationship with the distinguished French painter William Bouguereau (1825-1905), whom she eventually married in 1896, was much discussed in the capital and abroad. As his fiancée, assistant and student for many years, she profited from his mentorship more than any of his students and was able to take her skills as a figure painter to a level that eventually rivaled his. By 1878, when Moses in the Bulrushes was exhibited at the annual Paris Salon, Gardner's reputation as an artist was already well established. She had two other works on exhibit that year in the American section of the Universal Exposition, and was receiving a large number of notable visitors at her Left Bank studio. The American Register, a newspaper published by the American colony in Paris and catering to the colony and its visitors, reviewed the work: 'Miss E. J. Gardner has just completed her picture for the Salon, Moses in the Bulrushes. The subject is taken at the moment when Moses has just been placed amongst them, and his sister has parted the bulrushes to watch the approach of Pharaoh's daughter, who is seen in the distance. The expression of anguish in the mother's face is especially well rendered, and the coloring is remarkably fine' (American Register, April 6, 1878, p. 6). In a letter to her brother in Exeter, New Hampshire, she described her progress on the painting: 'I have advanced my picture of little Moses a good bit this month. The canvas is now covered and now comes what is to me the hardest part. I have always ideas enough for nice subjects but it is so hard to make the reality come up to the dream. I get sometimes quite frantic over it' (Elizabeth Gardner to Jonny Gardner, 2 December 1877). At the time, women were discouraged from attempting male-dominated genres such as history and religious paintings as these were considered a higher art form than portraiture or still life and, therefore, not appropriate to women's skills. By painting subjects such as Moses in the Bulrushes, the artist was placing herself in direct competition with her male counterparts. In addition, she chose to portray heroic women, as in this composition, where it was through acts of courage by the infant's mother and the Pharaoh's daughter that Moses' life was spared. Gardner's ambitions were not limited to her paintings; she also focused on her reputation as a Salon artist, 'I must work to get a medal in Paris and not for money a while longer' (ibid.). Her choice of priorities proved worthwhile. The next year, 1879, Gardner received an 'honorable mention' for her Salon submission, À la fontaine. However, it would take nine more years for her to achieve her dream. In 1887, she was awarded the first and only medal that was ever bestowed on an American woman painter at the Paris Salon. We would like to thank Dr. Charles Pearo for his assistance in cataloguing this work which will be included in his forthcoming Elizabeth Jane Gardner catalogue raisonné. (fig. 1) Moses in the Bulrushes, Archives photographiques du Musée Goupil, Bordeaux, carte album, no. 67, 1878.
Elizabeth-Jeanne Bouguereau - Before The Engagement

Elizabeth-Jeanne Bouguereau - Before The Engagement

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Lot number: 32
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LOT 32 PROPERTY OF TWIN TOWERS, A LIFE ENRICHING COMMUNITY, CINCINNATI, OH, SOLD TO SUPPORT THE OPERATIONS AND PROJECTS AT TWIN TOWERS ELIZABETH JANE GARDNER BOUGUEREAU AMERICAN 1837 - 1922 BEFORE THE ENGAGEMENT signed Elizabeth Gardner (lower left) oil on canvas 45 by 31 1/4 in. 114.3 by 79.4 cm
Elizabeth-Jeanne Bouguereau - The Farmer's Daughter

Elizabeth-Jeanne Bouguereau - The Farmer's Daughter

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Lot number: 28
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LOT 28 PROPERTY OF A NEW YORK ESTATE ELIZABETH JANE GARDNER BOUGUEREAU AMERICAN, 1837 - 1922 THE FARMER'S DAUGHTER 200,000—300,000 USD measurements measurements 67 by 38 3/8 in. alternate measurements 170.1 by 97.4 cm Description signed Elizabeth Gardner (lower right) oil on canvas We are grateful to Charles Pearo for his assistance incatalouging this work and for providing the note. Mr. Pearo iscurrently preparing the forthcoming Elizabeth Jane GardnerBouguereau catalogue raisonné. PROVENANCE Albert E. Nettleton, Syracuse, New York (possibly acquired circa1900)Alice E. Nettleton, Syracuse, New York (by descent from the above,her father)By descent from the above EXHIBITED Paris, Salon, 1887, no. 989Paris, Exposition Universelle, 1889, no. 114 LITERATURE AND REFERENCES Theodore Child, "Salon Honors," The Art Amateur, 1887, v. 17,no. 2, p. 28William Walton, Chefs-d'oeuvre de l'Exposition Universelle deParis, 1889, Philadelphia, 1889, vol. I, p. 8, illustratedBoston Sunday Journal, July 13, 1902, n.p., illustratedAnnette Blaugrund, Paris 1889, American Artists at the UniversalExposition, exh. cat., Philadelphia and New York, 1989, p. 277,illustrated p. 55 (a photograph of the work as hung in the Main"Expatriate" Gallery, United States Section, ExpositionUniverselle), p. 277 (an engraving of the painting)Charles Pearo, "Elizabeth Jane Gardner, The Best Imitator ofBouguereau," In the Studios of Paris, William Bouguereau & HisAmerican Students, exh. cat., Tulsa, 2006, p. 59, illustrated p.61, fig. 1 (a photograph of the painting)Charles Pearo, "Elizabeth Jane Gardner and the American Colony inParis, 'Making Hay while the Sun Shines' in the Business of Art,"Winterthur Portfolio, vol. 42, no. 4, 2009, p. 310, illustrated CATALOGUE NOTE Elizabeth Jane Gardner, an aspiring artist from Exeter, NewHampshire, arrived in Paris in 1864 where she supported herselfinitially as a copyist, selling copies of popular paintings toAmerican travelers and residents in Paris. Progressively, she beganpainting original works of art and, in 1868, she became one of thefirst American women to exhibit at the Paris Salon . Gardner continued to exhibit regularly for almost thirty moreyears until her marriage to William Bouguereau (see lots 63 and 66)in 1896. After Bouguereau's death, she resumed Salon exhibitions until 1914, culminating in one of the longest(fifty-eight years) and most successful expatriate careers in theFrench capital. In 1887, at the age of fifty, Elizabeth Gardner had thedistinction of becoming the first and only American woman to everreceive a medal (third class) at the Paris Salon . Thepainting that earned her such a distinguished position amongexpatriate and French artists was The Farmer's Daughter .This work is indeed a landmark painting in the history of Americanand French art, because it documents the long and arduous effortsof women painters like Gardner who aspired to professional careerswithin the male-dominated exhibition and training sites ofmid-nineteenth-century France. As early as 1877, the artist was turning down orders fromdealers to devote more time to her Salon submissions, "Imust work to get a medal in Paris and not for money a while longer.All will come right in time I am confident if I work hard and ampatient" (Elizabeth Gardner to John Gardner, December 2, 1887). Ayear later she wrote to her sister Maria, "I am bound to get amedal some year" (Elizabeth Gardner to Maria Gardner, January 10,1878). Then it came: "My pictures at this year's Salon have just received themedal which I have waited for so many years. I hasten to write youby the first mail for I know you will All sympathize with mein my happiness. The jury voted me the honor by a very flatteringmajority - 30 voices out of 40 ....No American woman has everreceived a medal here before. You will perhaps think I attach moreimportance than is reasonable to so small a thing, but it makessuch a difference in my position here, all the difference betweenthat of an officer and a private, and I hope it will be a goodthing for the sale of my paintings. I made an extravagant risk inmy large one this year. Monsieur Bouguereau is very happy at mysuccess. He is as usual President of the Jury, it is his greatimpartiality which has so long kept him in office. He has alwayssaid that I must succeed through my own merit and not by hisinfluence. I hope to send some photos soon....I have nearly ahundred letters of congratulation and dispatches to acknowledgetoday. I have begun by the dear ones at home" (Elizabeth Gardner toJohn Gardner, May 30, 1887). One contemporary source describes how the artist came to paintthis scene: "one afternoon, when Miss Gardner was on a sketchingexcursion, she was overtaken by rain and was forced to seek shelterin a barn. While there, she saw the "farmer's daughter" feeding herfowls, and was so struck with the picturesqueness of the scene thatshe made a drawing from which grew her prize picture" (Undatednewspaper article, Elizabeth Gardner Family Archives). The Farmer's Daughter would bring further fame to theartist in 1889. The painting was hung in the Main ("Expatriate")Gallery of the United States Section of Paris' ExpositionUniverselle together with Gardner's Too Imprudent (no.1886, sold in these rooms, April 18, 2007, lot 96). As illustratedin a contemporary photograph, The Farmer's Daughter was hungin a prime position to the left of the gallery's doorway, held inan elaborate frame of foliate and flower carving which remains withthe work today (fig 1.). Considered against works by some of thegreatest names in American painting such as William Merritt Chase,Thomas Eakins and John Singer Sargent, Gardner's submissions to theExposition Universelle earned her the bronze medal. Gardner's idealized vignettes depicting the uncorrupted valuesof nature and rural living contrasted sharply with the emergingImpressionists' depictions of city scenes, leisure and publicentertainment. They evoked a bygone era, devoid of ugliness and thefast-paced transformations of a modern world. Such works appealedto a number of prominent American collectors, many of them newlywealthy leaders of industry, like Albert E. Nettleton of Syracuse,New York, the first documented owner of The Farmer'sDaughter . The A. E. Nettelton Company, a shoe manufacturerfounded in 1879, employed over 600 workers a decade later andbecame distinguished for the quality of materials and innovation indesign. While it has yet to be determined precisely when and fromwhat source Nettleton acquired The Farmer's Daughter , heoften traveled to Europe, and likely would have been exposed toGardner's work through exhibition, her art dealer -- or simply byassociation with William Bouguereau, whose work was held in nearlyevery prominent American collection of the late nineteenth century.Since entering Nettleton's collection, The Farmer's Daughter has been known only by contemporary photographs and engravings. Itsexhibition at Sotheby's New York will be its first public viewingin well over a century.
Elizabeth-Jeanne Bouguereau - Young Girl With Lilies

Elizabeth-Jeanne Bouguereau - Young Girl With Lilies

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Lot number: 266
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MEASUREMENTS measurements 8 5/8 by 6 3/8 in. alternate measurements 21.9 by 16.1 cm DESCRIPTION (upper left) oil on canvas We are grateful to Charles Pearo for his assistance in catalouging this work. Mr. Pearo is currently preparing the forthcoming Elizabeth Jane Gardner Bouguereau catalogue raisonné CATALOGUE NOTE The present work may be a study for Gardner's 1884 composition known as Girl with Lilies or it may have been titled in French, Innocence . The same model appears in an 1887 work also titled Innocence and exhibited at the Paris Salon (no. 990).
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