David Bomberg

United Kingdom (18901957 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - David Bomberg
BOMBERG David Dancers

Christie's /Nov 21, 2013
3,579.53 - 5,965.88
6,287.40

Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of David Bomberg at auctions worldwide.
Go to the complete price list of works Follow the artist with our email alert
Along with David Bomberg, our clients also searched for the following authors:
Sidney Robert Nolan, John Piper, Frederick Hall, Tristram Hillier, Lynn Chadwick, Paul Nash, Elizabeth Frink
Artworks in Arcadja
328

Some works of David Bomberg

Extracted between 328 works in the catalog of Arcadja
David Bomberg - Ronda Valley (from La Casa De La Virgen De La Cabeza)

David Bomberg - Ronda Valley (from La Casa De La Virgen De La Cabeza)

Original 1954
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 42
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
David Bomberg (1890-1957) Ronda Valley (from la Casa de la Virgen de la Cabeza) with studio stamp (on the reverse) charcoal 17 ½ x 23 ¼ in. (44.4 x 59 cm.) Executed in 1954. Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). If the Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer also agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.
David Bomberg - Mt. Scopus And Government House

David Bomberg - Mt. Scopus And Government House

Original 1923
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 9
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Provenance Collection of Lt. Col. and Mrs. Robert Solomon Acquired by Mr. Margulies at the Ben Uri Gallery, June 21, 1968 Exhibited London, The Leicester Galleries, David Bomberg, Paintings of Palestine and Petra, February 1928 Jerusalem, Israel Museum, David Bomberg in Palestine, October 18, 1983 – Janurary 18, 1984 London, Ben Uri Gallery, David Bomberg in the Holyland, 1923-1927, Janurary 30- February 29, 1984 9 PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF MR. WILLIAM MARGULIES David Bomberg 1890 - 1957 MT. SCOPUS AND GOVERNMENT HOUSE oil on canvas 19 3/4 by 24 3/4 in. 50 by 63 cm. Painted in 1923. Estimate 80,000 - 120,000 USD Print Please notify me when the condition report is available
David Bomberg - Flowers

David Bomberg - Flowers

Original 1943
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 77
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
David Bomberg (1890-1957) Flowers signed and dated 'Bomberg '43' (lower left) oil on canvas 43 x 32 in. (109.3 x 81.3 cm.) Acquired from Cecily Bomberg and thence by descent to the present owner. R. Cork, David Bomberg, New Haven, 1987, p. 248, no. 313. Following his series of ‘Bomb Store’’’’ paintings in 1942 Bomberg lapsed into a phase of despondency leaving him unable to paint. His second wife, Lilian, brought a bunch of flowers home in the hope that it might inspire him. The flower arrangement lifted Bomberg’’’’s creative spirits and he was soon going early to Convent Garden every day to pick out sprays of blooms for his paintings. His fluid and rapid brushstrokes convey the extent of his newly returned enthusiasm and rigour for painting. Richard Cork comments, ‘In canvas after canvas the stalks and leaves launch themselves out of the vase with ebullience, burgeoning into blooms so exuberant that they often seem to scatter colour like star-bursts into the sky.’’’’ (R. Cork, David Bomberg, New Haven, 1987, p. 249).
David Bomberg - Dancers

David Bomberg - Dancers

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 101
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
David Bomberg (1890-1957) Dancers signed and dated 'Bomberg/19' (lower right) pen and ink with wash 10 3/8 x 7 7/8 in. (26.4 x 20 cm.) with Fischer Fine Art, London. Property from the Estate of the Late David Bomberg, sold by the Fischer Family Trust to benefit Hadassah International David Bomberg and the Fischer Family An Introduction by Dr Wolfgang Fischer David Sylvester (1924-2001), certainly one of the most important talent-scouts of the London art world in the second half of the 20th century, had met my father, Harry Fischer, for lunch and drew his interest to the oeuvre of the painter David Bomberg who had died a few years earlier (in 1957). Both gentlemen were not only passionate art lovers but connoisseurs, and both were members of the Reform Club in Pall Mall. As my father - like many others - enormously respected David Sylvester's ingenuity in talent spotting, his weight as art critic and his brilliance as a Jewish intellectual, he let himself be persuaded by David to go in for the full support of Bomberg - a speculative endeavour one would think. Speculative perhaps: David Bomberg, the seventh of eleven children of a very poor Polish Jewish immigrant family, found some recognition early on, became a war artist during the First World War, went to Palestine and continued to build up his career back in London often in dire circumstances. Praised by some critics as most promising, even as 'the most important British painter of our time' (John Berger) he died almost destitute in 1957. Ten years later the Tate Gallery honoured him with the exhibition David Bomberg 1890-1957. However the breakthrough and highlight came with Sir Nicholas Serota's 1979 show at the Whitechapel Art Gallery, David Bomberg: The Later Years. In 1983 the Israel Museum arranged a comprehensive show of his works of Palestine and Jerusalem, David Bomberg in Palestine 1923-1927, and the Hayward Gallery included Bomberg in the exhibition The Shadow: Recent British and European Art in 1986. Under Sir Nicholas Serota, the Tate Gallery acquired over the years a considerable collection of important Bomberg works. My father arranged our first Bomberg exhibition at Marlborough New London Gallery in 1964. Following our separation from Marlborough there were a number of Bomberg shows in our gallery, Fischer Fine Art in King Street, St James's, throughout the 1970s and 1980s. I remember the dinner party Sir Nicholas Serota gave at the Tate Gallery after one of our shows for Lilian Bomberg, the Fischers and a number of Bomberg enthusiasts. It must be said that apart from David Sylvester it is Serota who very early on had the vision to recognise Bomberg's all important place in modern British art. Meanwhile a next generation of artists emerged who knew Bomberg as a teacher and felt greatly inspired by him: Leon Kossoff and Frank Auerbach to name the best known. In interviews and in their writings they acknowledge their great debt to him. I would like to recall that our team with Cavan O'Brien, Jeffry Solomons and Anita Besson did their best over the years to look after Bomberg's works and to arrange shows in New York, Los Angeles and in Australia. My family and I are happy to be able to contribute through Bomberg's work to the needs of the Hadassah hospitals in Israel by sharing proceeds from the sale. When we visited the new building, the Davidson Tower, we were deeply impressed not only with the impressive architecture but also with the humanitarian arrangements of the rooms providing sleeping accommodation for family members and the children's wing with space for accompanying mothers or siblings. More could be said about the advanced technology and medical research. In a dream I would have loved that our whole collection could go to the Israel Museum - which other artist of Bomberg's background and achievements has in his work so many direct connections to the early days of the country? It would be a crowning of the long involvement of the Fischers with Bomberg not only to see material results but also to see his place represented by a large body of works in this museum of outstanding architecture, one which he would certainly have appreciated having always confronted the central issues of his time in his art. An Introduction to the Collection by Richard Cork Taken together, this remarkable group of works by David Bomberg reveals his fascinating range as an artist. The radical simplification of the earliest image, Composition for New Art Salon poster (lot 111), shows how much the young Bomberg was involved with modernist experimentation in the early 20th century. Even after the tragic disruption of the First World War, he made an inventive series of drawings and watercolours inspired by bargees on a Flanders canal-bank (lot 102) and a similar scene near London. One ink and chalk study in 1919, Design for Coterie (lot 109), focuses on a skeletal figure evocative of the horrors Bomberg had witnessed in the trenches. But other drawings of Players (lot 114), Dancers (lot 101) and Ghetto Theatre Series - Interval (lot 106) reflect his love of post-war life in London. At the same time, references to a more rural existence are introduced in Composition, Stable Interior, Riders on Horseback (lot 104). By 1922, however, Bomberg was yearning for a complete change. A year later he set off for Jerusalem. Some of the charcoal drawings he made there, like Study for Quarrying Palestine (lot 120), and Zionist Irrigation Development (lot 117), focus on intense human labour. Yet many of his Jerusalem pictures are studies for very carefully executed paintings of the city, and buildings as important as Church of the Holy Sepulchre (lot 118). The most prophetic works Bomberg made there are severely simplified, like Monastery of St George, Wadi Kelt (lot 119). It looks forward in style to 1935, when Bomberg drew the powerful images of a Horse (lot 123) and The Mountain of Asturias (lot 122). Forced to flee Spain in 1935 after the bitter Civil War broke out, he saluted one of its greatest masters by painting Goyaesque I (lot 124) in 1937. But he battled with depression as well, painting his second wife Lilian (lot 127) and then drawing an intensely revealing self-portrait in 1938 (lot 131). Their daughter Diana became the subject of a meditative portrait just after the Second World War (lot 126). In the same year he explored monumental limbs in a dream-like Nude Figure Composition (lot 130). Bomberg longed, above all, to return to Spain. And the final drawing, Plaza del Toros (lot 129), celebrates his beloved Ronda only two years before he died. We are very grateful to Richard Cork for preparing this introduction and the catalogue notes for lots 112, 125, 128 and 132. Sarah MacDougall and Rachel Dickson, senior curators at Ben Uri, are currently preparing a new monograph on the work of David Bomberg, which Lund Humphries plan to publish in 2017. They would be interested in hearing from any owners of works by the artist for possible inclusion in the book. Please write to: Sarah MacDougall and Rachel Dickson, c/o Christie's, Modern British Art department, 8 King Street, London. SW1Y 6QT. London, Fischer Fine Art, David Bomberg A Tribute to Lilian Bomberg, March - April 1985, no. 24.
David Bomberg - Irrigation, Zionist Development, Palestine

David Bomberg - Irrigation, Zionist Development, Palestine

Original 1923
Estimate:

Price:

Lot number: 46
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
David Bomberg (British, 1890-1957) Irrigation, Zionist Development, Palestine oil on canvasboard 31.9 x 40.2 cm. (12 1/2 x 15 7/8 in.) Painted in 1923 (according to a label verso) Footnotes PROVENANCE: With Marlborough Fine Art, London Sale; Christie's, London, 11 June 1982, lot 60 (as Farm Irrigation, Zionist Development ) As Richard Cork states, David Bomberg's Palestinian works, painted 1923-27, are 'for him a crucial turning point ...once landscape imagery took hold of Bomberg's imagination, humanity would never regain the position it had previously occupied in his work. Only Jerusalem and its hillsides promised to provide him with the stimulus he now needed.' (Richard Cork, David Bomberg , Yale University Press, New Haven, 1987, p.149). Bomberg, born to Polish-Jewish immigrant parents and raised in London's East End, became an integral part of the prodigal generation of students who matriculated from the Slade School of Arts in the years prior to the First World War. The Slade students (Spencer, Paul Nash, Nevinson, Roberts, Wadsworth to name but a few) came to their artistic adulthood at one of British Arts most vital moments. In November of 1910 Roger Fry opened Manet and the Post-Impressionists at the Grafton Galleries, an exhibition which in one fell swoop firmly placed new continental modernism at the forefront of British critical debate. Bomberg, like many artists of the day, quickly adapted and developed the concepts showcased. In 1913 he travelled with Jacob Epstein to Paris to view further cubist and futurist exhibitions and met among others, Picasso, Derain and Modigliani. Bomberg's subsequent semi abstract Vorticist works led to the general acknowledgment of him as one of the most adventurous artists of this progressive generation. However, in the wake of the atrocities of the First World War the flavour for such cutting edge modernism did not quite seem as appropriate. Artists, critics and collectors were seeking a return to realism, for an artist as progressive as Bomberg this required a reassessment of approach. He felt the desired change should be found by way of a new location. At the suggestion of fellow artist Muirhead Bone, Bomberg approached the recently formed Zionist Organisation with the goal of finding employment as their official artist in Palestine. It was proposed that through travel of the region and depiction of Zionist activities Bomberg's works could be used to promote the Zionist cause. Although this proposal was not initially successful, reduced funding was secured for a trip from the closely related Palestine Foundation Fund, whose mandate was to aid Jewish settlers in establishing new construction, irrigation schemes and to increase Jewish immigration. Bomberg left for Palestine with his wife Alice in April of 1923. The initial paintings he produced across the first two years of the trip were vast depictions of Jerusalem and Petra. These stemmed from an immediate enchantment with the exotic landscape and dazzling light. The formal compositions of his early abstractions were carried over into structural simplification, but not the dominant figural subject matter of previous works, which was almost entirely lost with most positive results. However, in these works Bomberg had moved too far from the doctrine under which he had secured funding. In May of 1924 the Zionist Executive complained in a letter to the London Organisation that his works were 'exclusively Arab' in subject and that they did not fulfill the propaganda brief initially proposed. Although Bomberg's personal opinions were not entirely in line with the Zionist cause he felt duty bound to deliver upon his agreement and in 1925 he started to address the task of painting the Zionist settlements. He painted strictly outside, in confidently applied, structured strokes, reminiscent of the earlier abstractions and pre-empting the later views of Ronda and Cyprus. Immediately after his return in Autumn of 1927 a selection from this body of work was shown at the Leicester Galleries. This was met by rapturous applause by way of glowing reviews in The Observer, Daily Telegraph, Sunday Times and The Times. However, for Bomberg these years were tinged slightly with personal sadness; it was over this period that his marriage to Alice broke down, but as is so often the case personal turmoil led to artistic gain as Cork concludes; 'Palestine gave Bomberg an enduring love of landscape painting in the open air, and it also gave him a life-long partiality for the heat and brilliance of Mediterranean countries. More important still, throughout the rest of his life he rarely forsook the habit developed in Jerusalem of scrutinizing his subjects first hand ... He had learned how to look during his years of intense lonely observation ... and this ardour discipline stood him in good stead ... infusing the objective study with his own passionately subjective response' ( Op.Cit , p.174).
Arcadja LogoProducts
Subscriptions
Advertising
Sponsored Auctions
Subscriptions

Who we are
Our Product
Follow Arcadja on Facebook
Follow Arcadja on Twitter
Follow Arcadja on Google+
Follow Arcadja on Pinterest
Follow Arcadja on Tumblr