Bicci Di Lorenzo

Italy (Firenze 13681452 ) - Artworks
BICCI DI LORENZO The Madonna And Child In Glory

Christie's /Jan 25, 2012
313,087.04 - 469,630.56
298,648.55

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Variants on Artist's name :

Lorenzo Bicci Di

Bicci De Laurent

Bicci Lorenzo Di

 

Artworks in Arcadja
42

Some works of Bicci Di Lorenzo

Extracted between 42 works in the catalog of Arcadja
 Bicci Di Lorenzo - Saint John The Baptist And Saint Michael - Left Panel Of The Main Tier Of A Polyptych

Bicci Di Lorenzo - Saint John The Baptist And Saint Michael - Left Panel Of The Main Tier Of A Polyptych

Original
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Gross Price
Lot number: 18
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Lorenzo di Bicci (Florence c.1350-?1427) Saint John the Baptist and Saint Michael - left panel of the main tier of a polyptych inscribed 'ECCE· ANGN / DEI · QUI TO' (centre, on the scroll) on gold ground panel 31¾ x 23 in. (80.6 x 58.3 cm.) The Convent of S. Agata, Florence. The Rev. Walter Davenport Bromley, Wootton Hall, Staffordshire, and by descent at Capesthorne Hall, Cheshire. THE PROPERTY OF THE BROMLEY-DAVENPORT FAMILY (Lots 18 & 19) THE REV. WALTER DAVENPORT BROMLEY (1787-1863) After visiting Wootton Hall, Dr. Waagen wrote 'Mr. Davenport Bromley is an ardent admirer of all such pictures, be they of the 13th or 16th century, in which an unaffected and genuine feeling is expressed. I found, accordingly, in his house a number of works, chiefly altar-pictures, illustrating the Italian schools from their first rise in the 13th century to their highest development in the 16th, such as I have not met with, especially as regards the earlier schools, in any other gallery in England' (Treasures of Art in Great Britain, ed., 1854, III, p. 371). The quality of the collection which so impressed Waagen seems all the more remarkable today. Professor Francis Haskell has described it as 'one of the most distinguished collections in England of early Italian painting' (Rediscoveries in Art, ed. 1980, p. 203, note 64) and Professor Federico Zeri has called Davenport Bromley one of the 'particularly outstanding collectors' of mid-19th century England (Behind the Image, 1987, p. 116). Walter Davenport Bromley was born to Walter Davenport, the third and youngest son of Davies Davenport (1757-1837). The Davenports had been a prominent Cheshire family since the thirteenth century and Davies Davenport served the county as High Sheriff, and for twenty-four years, its Member of Parliament. While Walter's eldest brother would inherit Capesthorne Hall and his other brother joined the army, Walter inherited Wootton Hall and Baginton from a distant relative in 1822, and assumed the additional name of Bromley. It was not until a visit to Florence and Rome in 1844 that Davenport Bromley, then in his late fifties, revealed a penchant for collecting pictures. During the following sixteen years, however, he acquired more than 170 early Italian panels, almost all of them religious subjects as befitted his cloth, taking advantage of all the opportunities offered by the great sales of the period to add carefully selected pieces to the collection. Having purchased a few pictures in Florence and Rome in 1844, Davenport Bromley set about collecting in earnest at the great sale of most of the collection of Napoleon's uncle, Cardinal Joseph Fesch, held in Rome in 1845; there he acquired more than forty pictures, by far the largest number he was ever to acquire at a single sale (for the indentification of some of these, see D. Thiébaut, Ajaccio, musée Fesch. Les Primitifs italiens, 1987, pp. 160-89, and the catalogue of the 1863 Davenport Bromley sale). On his return to England, he purchased a dozen paintings from the collection of William Young Ottley, mostly from his son's sale at Foster's in 1847, and during the following thirteen years acquired pictures from all the major collections sold at Christie's, including those of Edward Solly, Edward Harman (both 1847), General Meade (1851),King Louis-Philippe (1853), Joly de Bammeville (1854), James Dennistoun (1855), Samuel Rogers (1856), Lord Northwick (1859) and Samuel Woodburn (1860). While a few of Davenport Bromley's paintings were hung in his London house at 32 Grosvenor Street (Waagen, Collections of Art in Great Britain, London, 1857,, pp. 166-8), most were placed in four rooms at Wootton (see Waagen, op. cit., 1854, pp. 371-80). A watercolour by James Johnson, a joiner employed at Capesthorne, shows how a number of the pictures and Greek vases were displayed, J. Cornforth, Family Histories in Watercolour, Capesthorne Hall, Cheshire - II, Country Life, 8 September 1977, p. 608, fig. 4). Following Davenport Bromley's death, almost all of his collection was consigned for sale in these Rooms, of the 174 lots only eight failing to find buyers (including Giotto's Dormition of the Virgin, now in Berlin). These and a small number of pictures apparently bought back by Davenport Bromley's son William (who changed his surname to Bromley Davenport in 1868) were transferred to Capesthorne when he inherited it from his cousin in 1867. The rest were scattered and many have now found permanent homes in the great galleries of Europe and the United States. Seven are now in the London National Gallery, including Giovanni Bellini's Agony in the Garden, Foppa's Adoration of the Magi, the central panel of Pesellino's altarpiece of the Trinity, Boltraffio'sMadonna and Child, and a panel from Ugolino di Nero's Santa Croce altarpiece. Eight are in the Courtauld Institute, including Bernardo Daddi's polpytych of the Crucifixion, two predella panels by Lorenzo Monaco, the Coronation of the Virgin sometimes attributed to Lorenzo Monaco and a Madonna by the Master of San Miniato. The Fitzwilliam Museum has Cosimo Rosselli's Sacra Conversazione and cassone panels by Jacopo del Sellaio and Biagio di Antonio. Marco Pamezzano's Sacra Conversazione is in the National Gallery of Ireland and the Immaculate Conception by Girolamo Marchesi da Cotignola is in the Brera. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, has Sassetta's Journey of the Magi and two of the saints by Crivelli shown hanging between the bookshelves in James Johnson's watercolour. Notable among the pictures which have reappeared on the market in recent years are Duccio's Crucifxion, sold in the Rooms, 2 July 1976, and now at Manchester, and Lorenzo Monaco's Saint Jerome in the Wilderness, sold at Sotheby's, 6 July 1988. A polyptych by Taddeo Gaddi and four other early Italian pictures were sold in these Rooms, 21 May 1991, lots 33-7.
 Bicci Di Lorenzo - The Madonna And Child With Saints Matthew And Francis

Bicci Di Lorenzo - The Madonna And Child With Saints Matthew And Francis

Original 1432
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Gross Price
Lot number: 5
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LOT 5 PROPERTY OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART SOLD FOR THE ACQUISITIONS FUND BICCI DI LORENZO FLORENCE 1373 - 1452 THE MADONNA AND CHILD WITH SAINTS MATTHEW AND FRANCIS inscribed on the halos: SCS·MATTEVS·AP[OSTOLVS]; AVE·MARIA·GRATIA·PLE[NA]; SCS·FRANCISCHV[S] tempera on panel, shaped top, gold ground, in a carved and gilt engaged tabernacle frame with paired Solomonic columns overall: 44 5/8 by 22 1/4 in.; 113.3 by 55.6 cm.; painted surface: 32 3/4 by 18 3/4 in.; 83.2 by 47.6 cm.
 Bicci Di Lorenzo - A Triptych: The Madonna And Child With Saints Mary Magdalene And Christopher

Bicci Di Lorenzo - A Triptych: The Madonna And Child With Saints Mary Magdalene And Christopher

Original
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Lot number: 69
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Lorenzo di Bicci (Florence circa 1350-1427?) A triptych: The Madonna and Child with Saints Mary Magdalene and Christopher (central panel); The Angel of the Annunciation and Saint Bartholomew (left wing); The Virgin Annunciate and Saint Anthony Abbot (right wing); A female figure (outside right wing) tempera and gold on panel 21 7/8 x 19 in. (55.5 x 48.2 cm.) PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN Born in Florence around 1350, Lorenzo di Bicci may have trained with the Master of the San Niccolò Altarpiece, though his early paintings are highly informed by the work of Orcagna and his circle. A highly talented painter and businessman, Lorenzo would pass his thriving studio down to his son, Bicci di Lorenzo, and eventually to his grandson, Neri di Bicci, both masters in their own right. Intact triptychs from this period are extremely rare, and the present example constitutes an exceptional survival. A head in profile on the reverse of the right wing may portray one of the patrons of this exquisite object; however, identification of this figure is no longer possible. We are grateful to Everett Fahy for confirming the attribution based on first-hand inspection of the painting.
 Bicci Di Lorenzo - The Madonna And Child In Glory

Bicci Di Lorenzo - The Madonna And Child In Glory

Original
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Gross Price
Lot number: 26
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Description:
Lorenzo di Bicci (Florence c. 1350-1427?) The Madonna and Child in glory tempera and gold on panel 23 x 14¼ in. (58.5 x 36.3 cm.) Count Giuseppe Napoleone Primoli, Palazzo Primoli, Rome. Godfrey Locker-Lampson, London, by 1938. Anonymous sale; Christie's, London, 30 January 1948, lot 155, as 'Giovanni da Milano' (220 gns. to Canterbury). Dr. Alfred Scharf, until 1954. G. L. Lampson, A Few Italian Pictures Collected by Godfrey Locker-Lampson, n.d. [c. 1938], pp. 18-19, no. VI, as 'Giovanni da Milano'. B. Berenson, Italian Pictures of the Renaissance: Florentine School, London, 1963, I, p. 162, as 'Niccolò di Tommaso'. M. Boskovits, Pittura fiorentina alla vigilia del Rinascimento: 1370-1400, Florence, 1975, pp. 56, 336, pl. 58. R. Fremantle, Florentine Gothic Painters, from Giotto to Masaccio, London, 1975, p. 412, no. 840. D. Sutton, 'Robert Langton Douglas, Part IV,' Apollo, CX, no. 209, July 1979, pp. 8, 12, fig. 20. R. Offner, A Critical and Historical Corpus of Florentine Painting, Supplement: A Legacy of Attributions, New York, 1981, pp. 41, 99, fig. 79. M.S. Frinta, Punched Decoration on Late Medieval Panel and Miniature Painting: Part I, Catalogue Raisonné of All Punch Shapes, Prague, 1998, p. 506. Lorenzo di Bicci was born in Florence around 1350 and may have lived into the second decade of the 15th century. His name is first registered in the Florentine painters' guild in 1370 and his earliest documented work is a panel of Saint Martin Enthroned now in the Depositi Gallery, Florence, which dates to shortly after April 1380 and was painted for the Florentine guild of wine merchants, the Arte dei Vinattieri. He continues to appear in archival documents from Florence until 1410. The surviving records that mention Lorenzo provide a rich depiction of what life was like for a typical fourteenth-century artist in Italy. He was paid not only for independently commissioned paintings, but for work on major decorative campaigns, such as that of the Florence Cathedral, valuations of other art objects, drawn designs for projects in different media throughout the city, and the embellishment of pre-existing works with gold and enamel, to name just a few of his ventures. He was a painter-businessman who passed his practice down to his son, Bicci di Lorenzo, and his grandson, Neri di Bicci, both masters in their own right who ran thriving studios in Florence. Lorenzo di Bicci's art is informed by the works of Orcagna and his followers, including Jacopo di Cione and Niccolò di Pietro Gerini, and some scholars have convincingly argued that he was specifically trained in the workshop of a minor master called the Master of the San Niccolò Altarpiece. The present panel seems to date to Lorenzo's early period, in which he painted the Christ Child 'radiating strength and health' but lacking in corporeal density (Boskovits, op. cit., p. 56). The rosy-cheeked child kicks his feet playfully and grasps the little finger of his mother's hand - a remarkably innovative gesture of tenderness - but seems to float weightlessly in the Madonna's arms. In this way Lorenzo created Madonnas and saints, described by Boskovits as always in 'a type of ecstasy, with fixed eyes resplendent like enamel', that are relatable to humans but always in a distinct, sacred realm (ibid, p. 56). Lorenzo's art is also characterized by a luminous and nuanced use of color, particularly evident in the present panel. The Madonna's sumptuous red robe is depicted with incredibly sensitive attention to light and shadow, with dark glazes layered on for added richness in areas of shade. The central pair of figures is surrounded by a mandorla composed of red seraphim, of the highest angelic order, and blue cherubim, of the second-highest, which are depicted in sets of eight as outlined by church doctrine. Each angel is differentiated, with distinct facial expressions and orientations toward the central group, and enlivened with delicate lines of gold that evoke resplendent, holy light. One in particular, on the right, looks out directly to engage the viewer. The vermillion-colored seraphim echo the Madonna's rosy cheeks and her reddish-orange hair, which is beautifully articulated in individual strands and partially covered by a veil whose translucency, along with that of the Christ Child's shroud, is a testament to the artist's skill. The Madonna nursing the Christ Child is an iconographical type that dates back in Western art as far as the second century A.D. In this role, the Madonna is a symbol of nourishment and protection, both as the Mother of God and therefore as Mater omnium (Mother of all) and Nutrix omnium (Nurturer of all). As such, she also takes on the role of intercessor, or Maria Mediatrix, whose prayers could not be refused by the son whom she so nurtured. In this context of her role as nurturer, the golden stars adorning the Madonna's robe are particularly noteworthy, referring to her title as Stella Maris (Star of the Sea) and evoking the guiding light she provides. The first recorded owner of this painting was Count Giuseppe Primoli, a renowned collector and photographer as well as the great-grandson of Napoleon's brother, Lucien Bonaparte. Today the ground floor of his home, the Palazzo Primoli, contains objects from his collection and comprises the Museo Napoleonico, bequeathed to the city of Rome when the Count died in 1927.
 Bicci Di Lorenzo - Head Of An Angel In Profile

Bicci Di Lorenzo - Head Of An Angel In Profile

Original
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Lot number: 233
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Description:
LOT 233 LORENZO DI BICCI DOCUMENTED IN FLORENCE 1370 - 1427 HEAD OF AN ANGEL IN PROFILE 15,000—20,000 USD measurements measurements note diameter: 11 5/8 in.; 25.5 cm. Description fresco on earthenware, a tondo, unframed CATALOGUE NOTE We are grateful to Everett Fahy for identifying this painting tobe a work by Lorenzo di Bicci, based on firsthand inspection.
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