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Bicci Di Lorenzo

Italy (Firenze 13681452 ) - Artworks
BICCI DI LORENZO The Madonna And Child With Saints Matthew And Francis

Sotheby's /Jan 31, 2013
113,002.86 - 150,670.48
117,052.25

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Variants on Artist's name :

Lorenzo Bicci Di

Bicci De Laurent

Bicci Lorenzo Di

 

Artworks in Arcadja
44

Some works of Bicci Di Lorenzo

Extracted between 44 works in the catalog of Arcadja
 Bicci Di Lorenzo - Saint Benedictsaint Margaret

Bicci Di Lorenzo - Saint Benedictsaint Margaret

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Lot number: 1002
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Lot 1002: Bicci di Lorenzo, Saint BenedictSaint Margaret Description: The saints Benedict and Margaret of Antiochia are here depicted full-length and dressed in the pale habit of the Benedictine order. The dragon shown devouring a small nude figure, which Saint Margaret is holding on a leash like a dog refers to her legend. In this, a city prefect saw the shepherdess Margaret watching her flock and desired her, but when she steadfastly refused his advances he had her imprisoned. Whilst in jail, the devil appeared to her several times in the form of a huge, ferocious dragon, but she defeated him by making the sign of the cross and the saint remained unharmed. The style of both panels places them within the oeuvre of the Florentine painter Bicci di Lorenzo. He belonged to the second generation of a famous dynasty of painters founded by his father Lorenzo di Bicci (ca. 1350-1427) and continued far into the 15th century by Neri di Bicci (1418-1492) in the third generation. The present panels are comparable to the wings of a small altarpiece by Lorenzo di Bicci in the Berliner Gemäldegalerie (Fondazione Federico Zeri no. 11806). This work also shows the artist's typical abstraction and simplification of outlines in the saint's faces. Bicci di Lorenzo's work displays the unmistakable influence of his father, but his early works also show characteristics of Spinello Aretino, one of the main proponents of Florentine "Neo Giottism". Since the last decade of the 14th century, Aretino had contributed to the "Renaissance" of Giotto's forms occurring in the city, and the somewhat crude abstraction typical of this style is also visible in di Lorenzo's works of around 1415-20. The Berlin panels are characteristic of this, as is a small, round predella panel from a private collection which was recently sold by Sotheby's in New York (29.1.2015, lot 113). After around 1420, Bicci's style begins to display influences of Gentile da Fabriano, the forms becoming freer, more slender and of a finer character. It can be assumed that the present panels were created in circa 1420 for a winged altarpiece which would have aided the private devotion of a Benedictine monk or nun. The fact that the panels form a continuous earthy plane when placed next to each other indicates that they probably originally formed the reverse of the outer wings of an altarpiece which would have been seen in the closed position. Bicci di Lorenzo Dimensions: Each 33 x 10 cm Medium: Tempera on panel
 Bicci Di Lorenzo - Ecce Homo With The Madonna And Saint John The Evangelist

Bicci Di Lorenzo - Ecce Homo With The Madonna And Saint John The Evangelist

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Lot number: 113
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Bicci di Lorenzo FLORENCE 1373 - 1452 ECCE HOMO WITH THE MADONNA AND SAINT JOHN THE EVANGELIST, THREE PREDELLA ROUNDELS Quantity: 3 a set of three, all tempera on panel, gold ground, tondi each 9 1/4 in.; 23.5 cm. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Achille de Clemente Collection, Florence; His sale, New York, American Art Association, 15-17 January 1931, lot 193 (as Agnolo Gaddi); Anonymous sale, New York, Sotheby's Parke-Bernet, 20 January 1971, lot 1 (as Master of the Bambino Vispo); Private collection, Milan. Literature B. Berenson, Quadri senza casa, Il Trecento fiorentino, Milan 1932, pp. 184-186 (as Master of the Bambino Vispo); B. Berenson, Italian Pictures of the Renaissance - Florentine School, London 1963, p. 141 (as Master of the Bambino Vispo); B. Berenson, Homeless Paintings of the Renaissance, Bloomington 1969, p. 146-147, reproduced p. 147. Miklós Boskovits was the first to ascribe these striking predella roundels to Bicci di Lorenzo in 1978, an attribution most recently upheld by Sonia Chiodo. 1 Prior to Boskovits' comments, the panels had been published by Bernard Berenson as the so-called “Master of the Bambino Vispo” (see Literature), an artist now convincingly identified as Gherardo Starnina. Berenson did, however, concede that these panels were treated very differently from other works by the Master of the Bambino Vispo and, comparing them to another predella depicting the Man of Sorrows, he wrote, “The same artist is, however, entirely Tuscan in the three medallions of a Predella (…) where the same theme is as completely presented in another and perhaps intrinsically nobler language.” 2 There are marked parallels between the figures represented here with those in a portable triptych by Bicci di Lorenzo, dating to circa 1420 and sold London, Sotheby’’s in 2007 (fig. 1). 3 The faces of Christ and Saint John the Evangelist in the present roundels are remarkably similar to those of their counterparts in the Crucifixion scene decorating the right hand wing of the triptych. The Madonna here is also reminiscent of the same figure in the Christ Carrying the Cross on the left hand wing. Born in Florence, Bicci di Lorenzo trained under of his father, Lorenzo di Bicci, eventually taking over the workshop, which became a thriving enterprise, and was later handed to his own son, Neri di Bicci. Though one of the most important painters of the early 15 th century in Florence, Bicci di Lorenzo actively ignored the popular Renaissance styles that were embraced by his contemporaries. He, instead, adhered strictly to a Gothic treatment of his subjects, creating a distinctly retardataire style that he retained for the duration of his career. Isolated figures depicted against gold backgrounds came to characterize Bicci di Lorenzo’’s paintings and this beautiful Man of Sorrows with the Virgin and Saint John the Evangelist is entirely typical of his traditional, yet highly popular style. We are grateful to Sonia Chiodo for endorsing the attribution on the basis of photographs. 1. Frick Art Resource Library, photo archive note dated 3 October 1978; Private written communication from Sonia Chiodo, dated 16 October 2014. 2. B. Berenson 1969, under Literature, p. 147. 3. Anonymous sale, London, Sotheby’’s, 4 July 2007, lot 46. Fig. 1 Bicci di Lorenzo, Portable Triptych , sold London, Sotheby’’ ’’s, 4 July 2007, lot 46
 Bicci Di Lorenzo - Saint John The Baptist And Saint Michael - Left Panel Of The Main Tier Of A Polyptych

Bicci Di Lorenzo - Saint John The Baptist And Saint Michael - Left Panel Of The Main Tier Of A Polyptych

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Lot number: 18
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Lorenzo di Bicci (Florence c.1350-?1427) Saint John the Baptist and Saint Michael - left panel of the main tier of a polyptych inscribed 'ECCE· ANGN / DEI · QUI TO' (centre, on the scroll) on gold ground panel 31¾ x 23 in. (80.6 x 58.3 cm.) The Convent of S. Agata, Florence. The Rev. Walter Davenport Bromley, Wootton Hall, Staffordshire, and by descent at Capesthorne Hall, Cheshire. THE PROPERTY OF THE BROMLEY-DAVENPORT FAMILY (Lots 18 & 19) THE REV. WALTER DAVENPORT BROMLEY (1787-1863) After visiting Wootton Hall, Dr. Waagen wrote 'Mr. Davenport Bromley is an ardent admirer of all such pictures, be they of the 13th or 16th century, in which an unaffected and genuine feeling is expressed. I found, accordingly, in his house a number of works, chiefly altar-pictures, illustrating the Italian schools from their first rise in the 13th century to their highest development in the 16th, such as I have not met with, especially as regards the earlier schools, in any other gallery in England' (Treasures of Art in Great Britain, ed., 1854, III, p. 371). The quality of the collection which so impressed Waagen seems all the more remarkable today. Professor Francis Haskell has described it as 'one of the most distinguished collections in England of early Italian painting' (Rediscoveries in Art, ed. 1980, p. 203, note 64) and Professor Federico Zeri has called Davenport Bromley one of the 'particularly outstanding collectors' of mid-19th century England (Behind the Image, 1987, p. 116). Walter Davenport Bromley was born to Walter Davenport, the third and youngest son of Davies Davenport (1757-1837). The Davenports had been a prominent Cheshire family since the thirteenth century and Davies Davenport served the county as High Sheriff, and for twenty-four years, its Member of Parliament. While Walter's eldest brother would inherit Capesthorne Hall and his other brother joined the army, Walter inherited Wootton Hall and Baginton from a distant relative in 1822, and assumed the additional name of Bromley. It was not until a visit to Florence and Rome in 1844 that Davenport Bromley, then in his late fifties, revealed a penchant for collecting pictures. During the following sixteen years, however, he acquired more than 170 early Italian panels, almost all of them religious subjects as befitted his cloth, taking advantage of all the opportunities offered by the great sales of the period to add carefully selected pieces to the collection. Having purchased a few pictures in Florence and Rome in 1844, Davenport Bromley set about collecting in earnest at the great sale of most of the collection of Napoleon's uncle, Cardinal Joseph Fesch, held in Rome in 1845; there he acquired more than forty pictures, by far the largest number he was ever to acquire at a single sale (for the indentification of some of these, see D. Thiébaut, Ajaccio, musée Fesch. Les Primitifs italiens, 1987, pp. 160-89, and the catalogue of the 1863 Davenport Bromley sale). On his return to England, he purchased a dozen paintings from the collection of William Young Ottley, mostly from his son's sale at Foster's in 1847, and during the following thirteen years acquired pictures from all the major collections sold at Christie's, including those of Edward Solly, Edward Harman (both 1847), General Meade (1851),King Louis-Philippe (1853), Joly de Bammeville (1854), James Dennistoun (1855), Samuel Rogers (1856), Lord Northwick (1859) and Samuel Woodburn (1860). While a few of Davenport Bromley's paintings were hung in his London house at 32 Grosvenor Street (Waagen, Collections of Art in Great Britain, London, 1857,, pp. 166-8), most were placed in four rooms at Wootton (see Waagen, op. cit., 1854, pp. 371-80). A watercolour by James Johnson, a joiner employed at Capesthorne, shows how a number of the pictures and Greek vases were displayed, J. Cornforth, Family Histories in Watercolour, Capesthorne Hall, Cheshire - II, Country Life, 8 September 1977, p. 608, fig. 4). Following Davenport Bromley's death, almost all of his collection was consigned for sale in these Rooms, of the 174 lots only eight failing to find buyers (including Giotto's Dormition of the Virgin, now in Berlin). These and a small number of pictures apparently bought back by Davenport Bromley's son William (who changed his surname to Bromley Davenport in 1868) were transferred to Capesthorne when he inherited it from his cousin in 1867. The rest were scattered and many have now found permanent homes in the great galleries of Europe and the United States. Seven are now in the London National Gallery, including Giovanni Bellini's Agony in the Garden, Foppa's Adoration of the Magi, the central panel of Pesellino's altarpiece of the Trinity, Boltraffio'sMadonna and Child, and a panel from Ugolino di Nero's Santa Croce altarpiece. Eight are in the Courtauld Institute, including Bernardo Daddi's polpytych of the Crucifixion, two predella panels by Lorenzo Monaco, the Coronation of the Virgin sometimes attributed to Lorenzo Monaco and a Madonna by the Master of San Miniato. The Fitzwilliam Museum has Cosimo Rosselli's Sacra Conversazione and cassone panels by Jacopo del Sellaio and Biagio di Antonio. Marco Pamezzano's Sacra Conversazione is in the National Gallery of Ireland and the Immaculate Conception by Girolamo Marchesi da Cotignola is in the Brera. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, has Sassetta's Journey of the Magi and two of the saints by Crivelli shown hanging between the bookshelves in James Johnson's watercolour. Notable among the pictures which have reappeared on the market in recent years are Duccio's Crucifxion, sold in the Rooms, 2 July 1976, and now at Manchester, and Lorenzo Monaco's Saint Jerome in the Wilderness, sold at Sotheby's, 6 July 1988. A polyptych by Taddeo Gaddi and four other early Italian pictures were sold in these Rooms, 21 May 1991, lots 33-7.
 Bicci Di Lorenzo - The Madonna And Child With Saints Matthew And Francis

Bicci Di Lorenzo - The Madonna And Child With Saints Matthew And Francis

Original 1432
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Lot number: 5
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LOT 5 PROPERTY OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART SOLD FOR THE ACQUISITIONS FUND BICCI DI LORENZO FLORENCE 1373 - 1452 THE MADONNA AND CHILD WITH SAINTS MATTHEW AND FRANCIS inscribed on the halos: SCS·MATTEVS·AP[OSTOLVS]; AVE·MARIA·GRATIA·PLE[NA]; SCS·FRANCISCHV[S] tempera on panel, shaped top, gold ground, in a carved and gilt engaged tabernacle frame with paired Solomonic columns overall: 44 5/8 by 22 1/4 in.; 113.3 by 55.6 cm.; painted surface: 32 3/4 by 18 3/4 in.; 83.2 by 47.6 cm.
 Bicci Di Lorenzo - A Triptych: The Madonna And Child With Saints Mary Magdalene And Christopher

Bicci Di Lorenzo - A Triptych: The Madonna And Child With Saints Mary Magdalene And Christopher

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Lot number: 69
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Lorenzo di Bicci (Florence circa 1350-1427?) A triptych: The Madonna and Child with Saints Mary Magdalene and Christopher (central panel); The Angel of the Annunciation and Saint Bartholomew (left wing); The Virgin Annunciate and Saint Anthony Abbot (right wing); A female figure (outside right wing) tempera and gold on panel 21 7/8 x 19 in. (55.5 x 48.2 cm.) PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN Born in Florence around 1350, Lorenzo di Bicci may have trained with the Master of the San Niccolò Altarpiece, though his early paintings are highly informed by the work of Orcagna and his circle. A highly talented painter and businessman, Lorenzo would pass his thriving studio down to his son, Bicci di Lorenzo, and eventually to his grandson, Neri di Bicci, both masters in their own right. Intact triptychs from this period are extremely rare, and the present example constitutes an exceptional survival. A head in profile on the reverse of the right wing may portray one of the patrons of this exquisite object; however, identification of this figure is no longer possible. We are grateful to Everett Fahy for confirming the attribution based on first-hand inspection of the painting.
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