Bernardo Bellotto

Italy (Venezia 1721Varsavia 1780 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Bernardo Bellotto
BELLOTTO Bernardo Perspective De La Ville Neuve, Et Du Palais De S. M. Dit D'hollande Et Des Environs De La Campagne De Loschuwitz, Avec Une Partie De La Roiale Eglise Catolique, Et Des Basions De La Ville De Dresde (de Vesme 9; Kozakiewicz 156)

Sotheby's /Sep 20, 2007
7,155.12 - 10,017.17
8,051.24

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Variants on Artist's name :

Bellotto Bernardo Pseudonimo Canaletto

 

Artworks in Arcadja
119

Some works of Bernardo Bellotto

Extracted between 119 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Bernardo Bellotto - An Architectural Capriccio With Figures And A Soldier By A Pond, And Others In The Courtyard Beyond

Bernardo Bellotto - An Architectural Capriccio With Figures And A Soldier By A Pond, And Others In The Courtyard Beyond

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Lot number: 52
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Lot Description Bernardo Bellotto (Venice 1721-1780 Warsaw) An architectural capriccio with figures and a soldier by a pond, and others in the courtyard beyond oil on canvas, the extremities of the upper corners made up 42¼ x 45½ in. (107.3 x 115.6 cm.) with inventory no. '464' (lower left) Provenance Mrs. Freeman, Maine. with Dr. Rudolf Heinemann, New York. with Agnew's, London, by 1974. Exhibited New York, Colnaghi, Views from the Grand Tour, 25 May-30 June 1983, no. 1, catalogue introduction by J.G. Links and entry by C. Whitfield. London, Harari and Johns, Ltd., Six Centuries of Old Master Paintings, 16 November-15 December 1989, no. 21. Gorizia, Palazzo della Torre, Le Meraviglie di Venezia: Dipinti del '700 in collezioni private, 14 March-27 July 2008, no number, catalogue entry by D. Succi. Conegliano, Palazzo Sarcinelli, Bernardo Bellotto: Il Canaletto delle corti europee, 11 November 2011-15 April 2012, no. 11, catalogue entry by A. Delneri. View Lot Notes > Lot Notes This architectural fantasy, as Whitfield was the first to propose, must have been conceived during Bellotto's second period of residence at Dresden from 1761 until the winter of 1766-1767. He had first worked for the Saxon court there between 1748 and 1758, and it was in that period that his justly celebrated views of Dresden itself and the great castle of Königstein were painted. Several of the architectural compositions assigned to the second period at Dresden show richly decorated palaces seen through the arches of loggias, the shadows within which serve, as in this canvas, to focus the eye on the sharply lit buildings beyond. In other instances multiple versions, or variants, of such compositions survive (for example, the Capriccio with Motifs from the Ducal Palace and the Dioscuri; see S. Kozakiewicz, Bernardo Bellotto, London, 1972, nos. 307-9, and the Capriccio with a Motif from the Palazzo del Senato, Rome, op. cit., nos. 311-4): but there would appear to be no other versions of this composition, the number on which, 464, implies that at an early date it formed part of a very substantial collection. As Dario Succi noted, a number of the figures in this picture correspond closely with those in other pictures of the period, thus the guard is similar to one in an overdoor at Dresden (op. cit., no. 318), but with different boots and a yellow rather than a blue lining; while parallels could be cited for other figures. What is arguably Bellotto's most ambitious architectural composition of the kind, the upright fantasy in which Bellotto showed himself in the costume of a Venetian patrician, known from three versions (op. cit., nos. 333, 334 and 334a) is generally dated to the end of the Dresden period, 1765-1766: the signed Warsaw version (no. 333) is thought to have been taken to that city when Bellotto moved there in 1767, and it cannot be excluded that the artist created some of the replicas of other architectural fantasies when in Warsaw, or indeed that this composition might have been evolved after the artist left Dresden. The extent to which Bellotto drew upon the services of his son Lorenzo, who was to die in 1770, in the initial preparation of replicas of his pictures cannot be established. The son's one signed work, dated 1765 (Northampton, Massachusetts, Smith College; op. cit., no. 316), which daringly shows the wing of a great palace through a curved arcade, although similar in scale, is rather different in detail, corresponding in both tone and precision with, for example, the architectural fantasy of 1762 at Hamburg (op. cit., no. 318), universally given to the father. That Bellotto himself revised his ideas for the composition of this canvas is suggested by visible underdrawing between the mouldings below the spandrels of the arcade on the left and by the horizontal canvas join that runs just below the arches that frame the composition.
Bernardo Bellotto - View Of The Grand Canal In Venice With Santa Maria Della Salute On The Right.

Bernardo Bellotto - View Of The Grand Canal In Venice With Santa Maria Della Salute On The Right.

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Lot number: 3084
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Sale A148 Lot 3084 - 27 March 2009 15:00 * BELLOTTO, BERNARDO (Venice 1721 - 1780 Warsaw), Circle of View of the Grand Canal in Venice with Santa Maria della Salute on the right. Oil on canvas. 61 x 104 cm. CHF 70 000.- / 100 000.- € 46 050.- / 65 790.- * BELLOTTO, BERNARDO (Venedig 1721 - 1780 Warschau), Umkreis Blick auf den Canal Grande in Venedig mit der Kirche Santa Maria della Salute auf der rechten Seite. Öl auf Leinwand. 61 x 104 cm. CHF 70 000.- / 100 000.- € 46 050.- / 65 790.-
Bernardo Bellotto - Venice; View Of The Grand Canal With The Rialto Bridge, Seen From The North, The Fondaco Dei Tedeschi At Left, The Palazzo Dei Camerlenghi And The Fabbriche Vecchie Di Rialto At Right

Bernardo Bellotto - Venice; View Of The Grand Canal With The Rialto Bridge, Seen From The North, The Fondaco Dei Tedeschi At Left, The Palazzo Dei Camerlenghi And The Fabbriche Vecchie Di Rialto At Right

Original 1740
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Lot number: 114
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oil on canvas PROVENANCE James Harris (1709-1780); Thence by descent to his son, James Harris, 1st Earl of Malmesbury, Heron Court, Christchurch, Hants., and thence by descent in the family; William James Harris, 6th Earl of Malmesbury; By whom sold, Christie's, London, December 13, 1985, lot 7 (as Attributed to Bellotto); With Harari & Johns, Ltd., London; From whom purchased by the present owners in 1987. LITERATURE AND REFERENCES S. Kozakiewicz, Bernardo Bellotto, London 1972, vol. II, p. 437, cat. no. Z 193 (as not by Bellotto, based on a photograph in the Witt photo archive). CATALOGUE NOTE Perhaps no other area of Venetian vedute scholarship has occasioned more interest and discussion than the work of the young Bernardo Bellotto. In marked contrast to his later pictures, highly individual and distinctly conceived, and depicting foreign capitals? Dresden, Warsaw, Vienna and other Northern European cities? the artist's earliest paintings were of his native Venice, and produced under the influence, and, at first at least, under the direction of his uncle Giovanni Antonio Canal, called Canaletto. The high quality of even the very young Bellotto's output has made attributions at times difficult, with pictures by him being attributed to Canaletto, or other artists.1 However, recent archival work as well as a slowly increased awareness of Bellotto's own "signature" details, even in the most Canalettoesque of his works, have formed a more full and robust picture of the artist's earliest style. The present View of the Grand Canal with the Rialto Bridge is a key work in the understanding of the oeuvre of the young Bellotto, and demonstrates many of the signature details of his style, perceptible even in his earliest paintings. While the young artist had quickly absorbed, and, for the most part, mastered his uncle's impressive skills of perspective, coloration and effects of light, his artistic temperament asserted itself from very early on and is discernible even when his compositions adhere closely to a Canaletto prototype. In the present canvas, there are subtle examples of these which confirm Bellotto's authorship. Bellotto's idiosyncratic use of black, for example, is evident, in the expression of architectural details?windows, pilasters, roof tiles?and in boats and figures. The summary description of the waves in the water is also different than Canaletto's; elongated and more periodic, while Canaletto's are more varied. The interest in strong contrast in shade and dark is also seen, as is Bellotto's typical treatment of cloud formations, much less fluffy than Canaletto's and more hard edged.2 Perhaps most telling, however, is the overall palette and tonality of the View of the Grand Canal with the Rialto Bridge; rather than Canaletto's sunny and bright colors, it is painted in the flinty, wintery blue tones that would remain a constant throughout Bellotto's career. While these stylistic elements are evident, it is the exceptional provenance of the present painting that is more significant for the chronology of Bellotto's early work. In an addendum to a manuscript "Account of My Pictures" compiled in 1739, James Harris (1709-1780), the celebrated philosopher and politician, noted that he had recently added to his collection: Four Views of Venice?the two larger by Marieschi... the two lesser by Antonio Bellotti (sic), one representing the Custom house, the other the Rialto. The two first cost 20 guineas, ye two last ten. They were painted all at Venice & imported at my Request by Mr. Wm. Hayter of London, Merc.t 1743. 3 This mention of Bellotto, garbled though it is, is the first known documentary reference to the artist with which an identifiable painting can be securely connected, and shows that by this date, the artist was selling to an international clientele, under his own name (albeit misunderstood by the client who apparently confused his Christian name with that of his more famous uncle).4 Indeed the fact that the two views were purchased together with two larger paintings by Marieschi, who had just died that year and was an artist of considerable fame, is indicative of Belloto's burgeoning reputation, as is the reasonably good price that he got for them.5 These two "Bellotti" were then inherited by Harris' son, the 1st Earl of Malmesbury and then descended in the family, rarely seen, until they were both offered for public sale separately, the present canvas in 1985 (see Provenance), and its pendant just a few months later in 1986.6 They were soon purchased thereafter by the present owners, thus providing an unbroken and well-documented provenance almost from the moment they left the studio of the painter until the present day. Harris' manuscript note sadly does not allow for a precise dating of the present canvas, but does give a date of 1743 ante-quem for their production, and stylistically this View of the Grand Canal with the Rialto Bridge would seem to be in accord with other works of this period, circa 1740. Like many of Bellotto's earliest works, the present painting finds its source in a composition by Canaletto. A quintessential view of the city, this bend in the Grand Canal just before the Rialto Bridge was painted by Canaletto from the beginning of his career, as early as 1725. It depicts from left, the corner of the Palazzo Civran, which forms a solid, hard edge to the composition at left. Next to it is the Fondaco dei Tedeschi, and just to the right is the Rialto Bridge, the main focus of the composition. Next to that is the Palazzo dei Camerlenghi (a sort of treasury office for the republic) and then a bit further the open space of the Naranzeria and Erberia (the fruits and greens markets) with the Fabbriche Nuove beyond. There are a few cargo boats tied up at the side of the canal, and a few figures are standing in the now mostly vacant market piazze. It is most likely that Bellotto would have based it (as with its pendant) on the canvas that Canaletto had painted for Consul Joseph Smith, his most important patron.7 Bellotto's choice of one of Smith's pictures on which to base the composition itself is indicative of the young painter's future ambitions and his own attempts to rival and perhaps surpass his uncle. We are grateful to Bozena Anna Kowalczyk for confirming the attribution of the present painting to Bellotto. She has requested that it be loaned to the exhibition Canaletto and Bellotto: Two Masters of the Venetian View Painting Compared, to be held at Palazzo Bricherasio, Turin, March 13- June 15, 2008. 1 Many of the art historians who understood the field best had trouble distinguishing between the works of the two artists, or were hesitant in attributing Venetian views to Bellotto on stylistic grounds. For a full and reasoned discussion of the subject, please see C. Beddington, Bernardo Bellotto and his circle in Italy. Part I: not Canaletto but Bellotto, Burlington Magazine, no. 1219, vol, CXLVI, pp. 665-674. 2 Beddington (op. cit. p. 667) aptly and usefully describes Bellotto's clouds as resembling "icing sugar." 3 Cf. F. Russell, "Patterns of Patronage," in Canaletto in England, 2006, p. 40. 4 A group of four paintings by Bellotto were acquired a few years earlier in November 1740 for Marshall van den Schulenberg. These are now lost or unrecognized, although B.A. Kowalczyk hypothesizes that two of these pictures depicting views of the Piazetta may be the pair formerly in the Spitzer collection, Paris, now in a private collection (see Bernardo Bellotto and the Capitals of Europe, exhibition catalogue, Milan 2001, pp. 5-6, illus. figs. 2-3). 5 Another magnificent painting by Marieschi of the Bacino di San Marco which has remained in the family was purchased by Harris at the same time, but was given then to Canaletto himself, thus underlining the difficulties that even informed contemporaries had in distinguishing between the various vedutisti then active (see B.A. Kowalczyk, Canaletto: il trionfo della veduta, Milano 2005, pp. 144-146, cat. no. 31). 6 Venice, Entrance to the Grand Canal, looking West, with the Dogana; Sale: Christie's, London, April 11, 1986, lot 57 (as Attributed to Bellotto). 7 Now in the Royal Collection, see Constable and Links, cat. no. 236.
Bernardo Bellotto - Perspective De La Ville Neuve, Et Du Palais De S. M. Dit D'hollande Et Des Environs De La Campagne De Loschuwitz, Avec Une Partie De La Roiale Eglise Catolique, Et Des Basions De La Ville De Dresde (de Vesme 9; Kozakiewicz 156)

Bernardo Bellotto - Perspective De La Ville Neuve, Et Du Palais De S. M. Dit D'hollande Et Des Environs De La Campagne De Loschuwitz, Avec Une Partie De La Roiale Eglise Catolique, Et Des Basions De La Ville De Dresde (de Vesme 9; Kozakiewicz 156)

Original 1747
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Lot number: 2
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Etching, 1747, a fine impression of Kozakiewicz's third state (of five), with the coat of arms still printed from a separate plate, on paper with a Proprietary watermark, with margins, with the usual central vertical fold reinforced (mainly visible verso ), some thin areas along edges of sheet and other minor defects, very slight paper discoloration
Bernardo Bellotto - Vue De La Place De La Ville-neuve De Dresden, De La Grande Allée Qui Aboutit À La Porte Noire Et Des Deux Grandes Rues Dites Räbnitz- Gasse Et Breite Gasse Ò L'on Voit Aussi La Statue Equestre Du Roi Auguste Ii De Glorieuse Memoire Et L'ancien Hôtel De Vi

Bernardo Bellotto - Vue De La Place De La Ville-neuve De Dresden, De La Grande Allée Qui Aboutit À La Porte Noire Et Des Deux Grandes Rues Dites Räbnitz- Gasse Et Breite Gasse Ò L'on Voit Aussi La Statue Equestre Du Roi Auguste Ii De Glorieuse Memoire Et L'ancien Hôtel De Vi

Original 1750
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Lot number: 40
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Bernardo Bellotto (1721-1780) Vue de la Place de la Ville-neuve de Dresden, de la grande Allée qui aboutit à la Porte Noire et des deux grandes Rues dites Räbnitz- Gasse et Breite Gasse ò l'on voit aussi la Statue Equestre du Roi Auguste II de Glorieuse Memoire et l'ancien Hôtel de Ville prise du nouveau Corps de Garde vers l'entreé du Pont (De Vesme 14; Kozakiewicz 187) etching, 1750, de Vesme's first state (of three), Kozakiewicz's first state (of two), before the erasure of the proofing marks, a very good impression, with thread margins, the usual vertical central fold only visible on the reverse, a minor repair to the tip of the lower left sheet corner, generally in very good condition, framed S. 544 x 830 mm. Provenance The collection of Dresdner Kleinwort.
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