Charles Burton Barber

United Kingdom (18451894 ) - Artworks Wikipedia® - Charles Burton Barber
BARBER Charles Burton Sharp, Brother Of Fern - One Of Queen Victoria's Dogs

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Artworks in Arcadja
40

Some works of Charles Burton Barber

Extracted between 40 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Charles Burton Barber - Trust

Charles Burton Barber - Trust

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Lot number: 49
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Lot Description Charles Burton Barber (British, 1845-1894) Trust signed and dated 'C Burton Barber/1888' (lower left) oil on canvas 24 x 19 in. (60.9 x 48.2 cm.) Lot Condition Report I confirm that I have read this Important Notice and agree to its terms. View Condition Report Provenance with Savoy Galleries, New York, April 1967. Judge Allan Horowitz. Thence by descent to the present owner. Pre-Lot Text PROPERTY FROM A NEW YORK COLLECTION Literature H. Furniss, The Works of Charles Burton Barber, London, 1896, pl. 9, illustrated. Engraved Mezzotint entitled Trust, engraving by Frederick Stacpoole, A.R.A. (1813-1907), published by Thomas McLean, London, 1889, and exhibited at the Royal Academy, 1889 (no. 1813). View Lot Notes ›
Charles Burton Barber - Trust

Charles Burton Barber - Trust

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Lot number: 49
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Charles Burton Barber (British, 1845-1894) Trust signed and dated 'C Burton Barber/1888' (lower left) oil on canvas 24 x 19 in. (60.9 x 48.2 cm.) with Savoy Galleries, New York, April 1967. Judge Allan Horowitz. Thence by descent to the present owner. PROPERTY FROM A NEW YORK COLLECTION H. Furniss, The Works of Charles Burton Barber, London, 1896, pl. 9, illustrated. Mezzotint entitled Trust, engraving by Frederick Stacpoole, A.R.A. (1813-1907), published by Thomas McLean, London, 1889, and exhibited at the Royal Academy, 1889 (no. 1813). Charles Burton Barber was born in Great Yarmouth on 24 March 1845. He exhibited 32 paintings at the Royal Academy between 1866 and 1893. Barber was a meticulous painter and exhibited only one or two major works a year, many of which were commissioned by Queen Victoria. He worked for her for a quarter of a century, sometimes traveling to the Scottish Highlands to draw deer hunts, and eventually succeeded Sir Edwin Landseer as her principal canine portraitist. Nearly thirty of his oil portraits of Victoria's favourite dogs still hang in Osborne House, the Queen's holiday home on the Isle of Wight. Barber also contributed to Cassell's Illustrated Book of the Dog by Vero Shaw (London: Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co., 1881). During the 19th century, two giant dog breeds were popular in England. The Newfoundland dog, as epitomized by Landseer's Saved (1856), was favored by the early Victorians. These dogs are known for their tremendous strength, calm dispositions and loyalty. The Saint Bernard dog became popular in the late 19th century and was prized for its dependability and temperament. The breed originated from the Hospice at St. Bernard Pass in Switzerland, where their Alpine rescue ability is legendary. Their thick coats insulate against the cold and kept many a lost traveler warm, and their huge paws help them dig and walk through snow. Trust is one of a series of amusing compositions of children and pets which Barber exhibited from the late 1870s until his death. It was painted at the artist's studio and home at 1 Tichfield Road, Regent's Park, London. Barber had two daughters, and the girl in the present work appears to be the younger one, Audrey Margaret Barber. As today one might balance a biscuit on a dog's nose to test its obedience, here the little girl is placing a sugar cube taken from the silver reeded bowl on the Saint Bernard's nose. Another cube from a previous attempt is on the carpet. Barber would have been well aware of the double meaning of the painting's title; the wise sentinel trusts the girl, while her parents entrust their most precious prodigy to the gentle giant. Barber's earliest drawing of a Saint Bernard appeared on the inner front page of The Graphic Magazine on 2 December 1882. The following year, he painted a Saint Bernard accompanying a girl to school while carrying her umbrella in its mouth. In 1887, he included one in his painting A Scratch Pack. The year after Trust he painted Partners (Tooth & Sons, London, Spring 1889, no. 37), showing the same dog being cuddled by a girl. Barber was very influential on Arthur J. Elsley, who also painted Saint Bernards in many of his works. One of Elsley's paintings, entitled I'se Biggest (R.A. 1892) featured a Saint Bernard named Rollo, the star of a play at the Lyric Theatre. Leading magazines of the time such as the Illustrated London News, The Graphic, Penny Illustrated Paper, and The Lady's Pictorial reproduced Barber's works as prints sent out with their Christmas issues. Barber's biographer, neighbor and fellow artist Harry Furniss wrote, 'How conscientious he was, and how he painted and repainted every detail! He was a delightful companion, the gentlest and truest of friends, and the sweetest-natured man that ever held a brush.' Barber died of diabetes at his home on 27 November 1894 at the age of 49. Queen Victoria sent a representative to his cremation with a wreath bearing the inscription 'A mark of admiration and regard from Victoria R.I.'. Barber's most famous work, Suspense, was reproduced after his death as a large color chromo-lithograph presented with Pears' Annual in 1895. Trust is a version of Barber's Royal Academy entry, Summer 1888 (no. 387). Another version, loaned by Charles Churchill of Weybridge Park, Surrey, was exhibited at St. Jude's School House, Commercial Street, Whitechapel Fine Art Exhibition, Easter 1889. Churchill also owned two other Barber works, In Disgrace and Once Bit, Twice Shy. He loaned his version of Trust again to the next Whitechapel exhibition later in 1889, where it was voted the third best painting, after works by William Holman Hunt and Francis Davis Millet. We are grateful to Terry Parker for his help in preparing this catalogue entry.
Charles Burton Barber - Once Bit, Twice Shy

Charles Burton Barber - Once Bit, Twice Shy

Original 1885
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Lot number: 53
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LOT 53 PROPERTY OF A LADY CHARLES BURTON BARBER BRITISH, 1845-1894 ONCE BIT, TWICE SHY signed C. Burton Barber and dated 1885 (lower right) oil on canvas 150,000—200,000 USD measurements measurements 36 1/4 by 28 1/4 in. alternate measurements 92 by 71.7 cm Description signed C. Burton Barber and dated 1885 (lower right) oil on canvas Sale: Sotheby's, London, June 14, 1989, lot 179, illustrated andas coverCollection of the late Mr. and Mrs. Gordon T. Southam, Vancouver,Canada (acquired at the above sale)Thence by descent London, Royal Academy, 1885, no. 1120London, Royal Academy, Summer Exhibition, 1886 "Royal Academy Third Notice," The Times, May 25, 1885, p.4Henry Blackburn, Academy Notes, London, 1885, p. 16The Art Journal, 1885, p, 258 The present work is one of Burton Barber's characteristicallycharming works of children and dogs. In his short life (he died at49), the artist earned great popularity over his twenty-eight yearsof exhibitions at London's Royal Academy even drawing the attentionof Queen Victoria who requested the artist paint the royal dogs. Inparticular, Once Bit, Twice Shy drew great acclaim upon itsfirst exhibition in 1885. The Academy Notes considered thecomposition, hung among the works of less remarkable landscapeartists, "a highly humorous incident not to be missed" (Blackburn,p. 16). The Times elaborated, naming Once Bit, TwiceShy "the most amusing picture in the Academy... It is adoubtful experiment to make an elaborate joke on canvas, but if thejokes are as good as this one there is much to be said for them"("Royal Academy," p. 4). Set in a well appointed interior, a young girl sits neatlydressed in white pinafore over a vibrantly blue silk dress,fox-terrier puppy in arm, one hand tucked under his chin while theother holds a silver spoon, digging deep into a mustard pot. Thehumorous tension of the moment was easily understood andappreciated by contemporary viewers. As a Royal Academy visitorexplained: "the dog, as the title implies, has had the sameexperience before, and once is enough. But its young mistress hasno idea of paying any attention to random protests, and isproceeding with perfect calmness to her duty. The contrast betweenher tranquil indifference and the ludicrous horror depicted on theface of the puppy is a pictorial triumph" ("Royal Academy," p.4). Parents are rarely (if ever) present in Burton Barber'ssubjects, yet in the present work the carafe, empty wine glasses,and discarded cloth napkin suggest they have recently left the room— leaving their young daughter to her experiments. Despite the girlremoving the puppy's belled collar, adult attention may not beavoided for long. In the darkened room, with its deep brown woodfurniture and richly patterned carpet, light bounces across thetablecloth and spills over the girl's glossy auburn hair and thepuppy's white coat, suggesting a door that has been reopened.Burton Barber's contrasting light effects adds to the theatricalityof the scene, while his brilliant ability to capture the psychologyof this subjects is evidenced in the detailed expression of thewary puppy and his tense posture as well as the young girl'sstudied, downward gaze and sweet if determined smile. Outside of the exhibition galleries, Once Bit, Twice Shy, like many of Burton Barber's compositions, was likely well knownthrough the wide distribution of prints and chromolithographs thatwere sold of his works.
Charles Burton Barber - Sharp, Brother Of Fern - One Of Queen Victoria's Dogs

Charles Burton Barber - Sharp, Brother Of Fern - One Of Queen Victoria's Dogs

Original 1877
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Lot number: 180
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Other properties Charles Burton Barber (British,1845-1894) Sharp, brother of Fern - one of QueenVictoria's dogs signed and dated 'C.B.Barber./1877.' (lower right); stencilled onthe reverse 'Sharp. Brother of Fern. C.B.Barber.', also bearsWindsor Castle inventory stamp, no. 1914 and a stamp denotingproperty of Queen Victoria oil on canvas 16 1/8 x 20 1/2 in. (41 x 52 cm.) Sharp was a smooth-coated Border Collie whose upmarket residencewas no less than the Queen's own at Windsor Castle. During hislifetime Sharp was the favourite companion of Queen Victoria. Hewas named after a government minister who was in favour withVictoria at the time and was a familiar sight at her side almosteverywhere she went. No stranger to his regal position, Sharp was known as anill-tempered dog who frightened most of the royal entourage and whospoiled for a fight with other dogs. As Victoria notes in her diaryof Wednesday 6 September 1869: "At five minutes to eleven rode off with Beatrice, good Sharpgoing with us and having occasional 'collie-shangies' (a Scotchword for quarrels or rows) with collies when we came nearcottages". Sharp's affection was indeed reserved only for the Queen and ofcourse the redoubtable John Brown, whose companionship the Queendepended upon after the death of her husband Prince Albert. Sharp is buried in the grounds of Windsor Home Park, Berkshire,England, with a tomb stone that reads: Sharp, the favourite and faithful Collie of Queen Victoria from1866 to 1879. Died now 1879 aged 15 years As a breed, the Collie experienced a surge in popularity as aresult of Queen Victoria's patronage, and as William Secord notes,with seven separate breed clubs by 1895, the Collie transformedfrom a rough and ready working dog to a refined show dog by the endof the 19th century. Although Victoria kept collies as pets andonly briefly showed them, her involvement with the breed encouragedother women to exhibit and this subsequently led to the forming ofthe Ladies Kennel Club, which had the specific remit of preventingcruelty in exhibiting practice. She was also a keen supporter ofthe RSPCA.
Charles Burton Barber - My First Partner

Charles Burton Barber - My First Partner

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Lot number: 35
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Charles Burton Barber (1845-1894) My first partner signed 'C. Burton Barber' (lower left) oil on canvas 18¼ x 12½ in. (46.3 x 31.7 cm.) Pre-Lot Text VARIOUS PROPERTIES Provenance Samuel Walmsley Esq. Exhibited London, Arthur Tooth & Sons Gallery, Spring 1889, no. 37, as 'Partners'. Lot Notes This is one of numerous child and dog paintings executed by Barber towards the end of his life. These works were very popular with dealers and were often reproduced as prints. This painting was reproduced as' My First Partner', a mixed method engraving by Frederic Stacpoole, A.R.A. (1813-1907), published by Arthur Tooth & Sons, 1890. Barber was a shy retiring man, methodical and meticulous in his work. He exhibited thirty-two paintings at the Royal Academy between 1866 and 1893, many of them canine portraits commissioned by Queen Victoria. Barber normally dated his works, but this one is not. The child model appears to be too young to be one of the artist's two daughters. The terrier is the Barber family pet. There is a photograph of the dog in the artist's photo album annotated by him; 'Gip came to us May 1888 and died 10th June 1893.' The pet first appeared in Barber's 1889 painting Amateur Gardeners, followed by Too Many Cooks and Compulsory Education both 1890, Wait for It and Cosy in 1891, and A Cubby House in 1892. The following year Barber painted the same child with 'Gip' in a similar, larger work, dated 1893, given the title The Family Wash when it was purchased by the soap magnate William Hesketh Lever. The original oil on canvas now hangs in The Lady Lever Art Gallery, Port Sunlight, Merseyside. Lever had it reproduced as a colour chromolithograph advertising show-card, and as colour magazine inserts for his Sunlight Soap. Barber still painted his pet, after its death, in Secrets (1894) and his most famous painting Suspense, reproduced by the soap company A. & F. Pears, as a print presented with Pears' Annual 1895. The original oil painting was sold for £400,000 at Christie's, New York, 22 May 1997, lot 169. Barber died of diabetes at his home at 1 Tichfield Street, Regent's Park, London, 27th November 1894, aged 49. The following day Queen Victoria sent a telegram to his family saying that she was "dreadfully shocked" at his death as she was just going to send for him; she also expressed her sympathy with their bereavement. He was cremated at Brookwood, Woking, Surrey, on Saturday 1st December. Queen Victoria sent Mr. Horace West of the Home Office as representative, with a wreath bearing the inscription 'A mark of admiration and regard from Victoria R.I.' Fellow artist Harry Furniss wrote 'He was a delightful companion, the gentlest and truest of friends, and the sweetest-natured man that ever held a brush.' We are grateful to Terry Parker for his help in preparing this catalogue entry.
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