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Jean Béraud

France (1849 -  1935 ) Wikipedia® : Jean Béraud
BÉRAUD Jean Envol D'un Biplan Type Wright

Christie's /May 23, 2017
89,855.33 - 134,783.00
128,181.88

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Artworks in Arcadja
229

Some works of Jean Béraud

Extracted between 229 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Jean Béraud - L'arc De Triomphe, Champs-elysées

Jean Béraud - L'arc De Triomphe, Champs-elysées

Original 1882
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Lot number: 69010
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Description: Jean Béraud (French, 1849-1935) L'Arc de Triomphe, Champs-Elysées, circa 1882-85 Oil on canvas 22-1/2 x 15-1/4 inches (57.2 x 38.7 cm) Signed lower right: Jean Beraud PROPERTY FROM THE MERRYL ISRAEL ARON FAMILY TRUST PROVENANCE: [With]Mac Connal-Mason & Son Fine Paintings, London (label); Newhouse Galleries, New York. EXHIBITED: Richmond Museum of Fine Arts, "Expert's Choice, 1000 Years of the Art Trade," 1983. LITERATURE: J. Walker, Expert's Choice, 1000 Years of the Art Trade, exhibition catalogue, Richmond Museum of Fine Arts, 1983, p. 181, illustrated; P. Offenstadt, Jean B?éraud, The Belle Époque, A Dream of Times Gone By: Catalogue Raisonné, Paris, 1999, p. 144, no. 134, illustrated. Honoring those who fought and died for France during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, the Arc de Triomphe de l'Étoile stands majestically at the center of the present work by Jean Béraud, the master of Belle Époque Parisian painting. In this stunning portrait of the famous monument on a glorious sunlit day, Béraud presents the prototypical view of the Champs-Élysées: fashionably dressed figures stroll under the trees and others ride in carriages down the busy avenue. Many have commented on Beraud's realistic portrayal of everyday life at the fin-de-siecle and this attention to detail extends to his meticulous depiction of a plaster sculpture that surmounted the Arc itself at the time-Alexandre Falguière's The Triumph of the Revolution. As one of the finest sculptors to practice during the Second Empire, Falguière conceived his monumental plaster sculpture as an elaborate quadriga preparing to "crush Anarchy and Despotism", a worthy commentary on the political vagaries that had beset France in the past. The plaster group was in place from 1882 until it crumbled in 1886. Unfortunately, no version in bronze was commissioned; there is only a maquette of the sculpture in the collection of the Musée d'Orsay, and, of course, images such as Béraud's Arc de Triomphe. HID04901242017
Jean Béraud - La Conversation

Jean Béraud - La Conversation

Original
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Lot number: 111
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Jean Béraud FRENCH LA CONVERSATION signed Jean Béraud(lowerright) oil on canvas 22 by 15 1/2 in. 55.9 by 39.3 cm Sale: Galerie Charpentier, Paris, June 15, 1954,lot 4, illustrated Collection of Margaret Thompson Biddle, Paris and New York (and sold, Sotheby's, New York, May 18, 2016, lot 35, illustrated) Acquired at the above sale Literature Patrick Offenstadt, Jean Béraud 1849-1935, The Belle Époque: A Dream of Times Gone By, catalogue raisonné, Cologne, 1999, p. 182, no. 201, illustrated Catalogue Note The opulent spectacle of Paris, and the city\’s people in particular, was Jean Béraud's subject of choice. Whetherpromenading on the city\’s grand boulevards or the banks of the Seine, in carriages in the Bois de Boulogne, or in private, intimate spaces such as in the present work, it is the endless parade of characters who animate Béraud\’s splendid and idiosyncratic vision of Paris, and bring the subject life. Abandoning his early ambitions to become a lawyer, Jean Béraud studied portraiture with Léon Bonnat, alongside such well-known contemporaries as Gustave Caillebotte and Henri Toulouse-Lautrec. While Béraud initially emulated his master's choice of subject and painted portraits of women and children, he was quickly drawn to representing modern urban life and developed his own inimitable style. Béraud\’s affection for Parisians granted him notoriety and popularity; Marcel Proust described him as "a charming creature, sought in vain, by every social circle" and he was alleged to be a perfect gentleman, impeccably dressed and above trends and fashion (as quoted in Offenstadt, p. 7). He was intrigued by all aspects ofla vie parisienne, and once wrote to fellow artist Alfred Roll "I find everything but Paris wearisome" (as quoted in Offenstadt, p. 14). La Conversationtakes place in a well-appointed interior, furnished with white painted chairs in the Louis XVI style, a rococo carved gilt wood console table and mirror in the Louis XV style (in which the woman is beautifully reflected). The walls appear to be part of a Louis XV carved, parcel-gilt and white-painted boiserie, similar to thesalon ovale de la princesseat the Hôtel de Soubise in Paris. The couple are in evening costume, either having just returned from a ball or party, or about to go to one. Béraud is a master of subtle gestures and he has carefully rendered them here. With his hands grasping the back of the chair with intention, the man tilts back, somewhat awkwardly, perhaps in nervous anticipation. He cranes his head forward as if awaiting a response to his proposition as his companion looks down introspectively. Standing in her extraordinary cornflower blue gown, with a lowbustle silhouette, wasp waist, peplum withbasques and flounces on her skirt, the position of her hands holding an open fan may reveal a clue to her response. With the balcony doors flung wide open, Béraud deliberately brings the humming street scene into the apartment. Carriages and café tables, lit by many streetlamps and lanterns, seem to be as integral to the scene as the lamps on the console table. In the neighboring apartments beyond, illuminated windows frame figures in silhouette, suggesting the constant activity and drama of living in the city of light. Like many of his Impressionist contemporaries, Béraud was interested in the city\’s increasingly blurred boundaries of public and private, and the balcony had become emblematic of a shift towards ambiguity. A ubiquitous architectural feature of the apartments in Haussmann\’s Paris, the balcony was an extension of the home as well as a connection to the street, simultaneously inside and outside (David Van Zanten, \“Looking Through, Across and Up, The architectural aesthetics of the Paris Street,\”Impressionism, Fashion, Modernity,exh. cat., The Art Institute of Chicago, The Metropolitan Museum, New York, Musée d\’Orsay, Paris, 2012, p. 154-8). The space was a potent device for artists, notably employed by Édouard Manet inLe Balcon(1868-9, Musée d\’Orsay, Paris, fig. 1) in which he depicts the artist Berthe Morisot, wearing a relaxed dress that suggests an intimate gathering, and violinist Fanny Claus, who is dressed to be out walking with gloves and parasol. Similarly, Gustave Caillebotte punctures interior boundaries in his painting, Interior, Woman at a Window(1880, Private Collection) depicting a woman dressed for a promenade and turned away from the viewer, looking through the closed door of her balcony towards the street. The previous owner of La Conversation was the legendary American collector, Margaret Thompson Biddle. Upon her death, the Galerie Charpentier in Paris offered a portion of her extraordinary art collection, including masterpieces by Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Claude Monet, Paul Cézanne and a still life by Paul Gauguin which sold for three times its estimate and is widely credited for launching the secondary market for Impressionist art. The catalogue\’s introduction was written by the renowned French politician André Cornu, and he rightly described Mrs. Thompson Biddle as an heiress, ambassadress, elegant hostess, and friend to all, a woman of great heart, charm, intelligence and beauty, American by birth, French in spirit. Fig. 1 Édouard Manet, Le Balcon, 1868-9, Musée d\’Orsay, Paris
Jean Béraud - Young Woman With Children In Mountain Landscape

Jean Béraud - Young Woman With Children In Mountain Landscape

Original
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Lot number: 179
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JEAN BERAUD (FRENCH 1848-1935) Young Woman with Children in Mountain Landscape oil on panel 45.8 x 37.5 cm (18 x 14 3/4 in.) signed lower right PROVENANCE Hotel Drouot, Paris, June 30, 1952, lot 115 Schweitzer Gallery, New York LITERATURE Patrick Offenstadt, Jean Beraud 1849-1935, The Belle Epoque: A Dream of Times Gone by, Catalogue Raisonne, Paris, 1999, p. 237 (illustrated)
Jean Béraud - Envol D'un Biplan Type Wright

Jean Béraud - Envol D'un Biplan Type Wright

Original 1909
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Lot number: 26
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Jean Béraud (French, 1849-1936) Envol d'un biplan type Wright signed 'Jean Béraud' (lower left) oil on board 24 5/8 x 18 ½ in. (62.5 x 47 cm.) Painted circa 1909. The present work commemorates Wilbur Wright\\\’s flight of March 2nd, 1909 which took place at Pau in south western France. Six years earlier, Wilbur and his brother Orville Wright completed the first successful manned flight at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. Wilbur Wright arrived in France in May of 1908. The airplane, which had been shipped to France prior to Wilbur\\\’s arrival, was damaged as a result of careless customs handling and Wilbur spent two stressful months preparing for the first flight. Hunaudières racecourse, southwest of Paris, was selection as the flying site, and Wilbur made his first flight on August 8, 1908. Seeking warmer weather, Wilbur moved his flight demonstration to Pau, a resort town in the south of France in January of 1909. Over the next year, he made more than two hundred flights in Europe, dazzling crowds whenever he took to the air. He became a hero, lavished with praise, honored at ceremonial dinners with political leaders and the aeronautical elite and was the recipient of numerous prizes and medals, including the Legion d\\\’honneur. In Envol d\\\’un biplane type Wright, Béraud has captured all of the wonder and excitement that must have accompanied these first demonstrations of man\\\’s ability to finally fly. It is clearly a social event; the elegantly attired figures of the man and woman in the foreground, she in her fur wrap and he in his elegant coat and bowler hat, look to the sky in awe, the gathered crowd all raising their hats and cheering this almost unimaginable feat. The sky and landscape are rendered in quickly laid down washes which emphasizes the spontaneity of the composition. It is as if the entire scene is set in motion, an echo of the new mode of transportation speeding towards the ebullient crowd below. James Gordon Bennett, Jr., the first owner of this painting, was the powerful American newspaper magnate and sportsman who was brought up and educated mainly in France. In 1866, his father named him to run the family owned New York Herald, which was especially known for its innovative reporting and European coverage. The younger Bennett raised the paper\\\’s profile internationally when he provided the financial backing for the 1869 expedition by Henry Morton Stanley into Africa to find David Livingstone in exchange for the Herald having the exclusive account of Stanley\\\’s progress. After he settled in Paris, he launched the Paris Herald Tribune, which became the forerunner of the International Herald Tribune. Mr. Bennett sponsored many international sporting events, including yachting, hot-air balloon and airplane races, as well as several scientific expeditions. He organized the first Polo match in the United Stated at Dickel\\\’s Riding Academy at 39th Street and Fifth Avenue in New York City and helped found the Westchester Polo Club. He established the Gordon Bennett Cup for international Yachting and the Gordon Bennett Cup for automobile races. In 1906, he funded the Coupe Aeronautique Gordon Bennett for the fastest speed on a closed circuit for airplanes. The painting was next owned by Francois Coty, the celebrated Parisian perfumer and art collector. The Coty firm, which he established in 1904, remains active today. (fig. 1) A Wright biplane in fight.
Jean Béraud - Jeune Femme Et Enfants Dans Un Paysage De Montagne

Jean Béraud - Jeune Femme Et Enfants Dans Un Paysage De Montagne

Original
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Lot number: 506
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Jean Béraud

JEUNE FEMME ET ENFANTS DANS UN PAYSAGE DE MONTAGNE

1849 - 1935

signed Jean Béraud. (lower right) oil on panel 18 by 14 3/4 in.; 45.8 by 37.5 cm.

Provenance

Sale: Hôtel Drouot, Paris, June 30, 1952, lot 115 (titled Village de montagne) Schweitzer Gallery, New York Sale: Doyle, New York, November 2, 1998, lot 45 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner
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