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Carl Andre

(1935 ) Wikipedia® : Carl Andre
ANDRE Carl 81 Ace Zinc Square

Sotheby's /Nov 11, 2015
519,249.31 - 741,784.73
Not Sold

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Artworks in Arcadja
239

Some works of Carl Andre

Extracted between 239 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Carl Andre - Thirteenth Copper Cardinal

Carl Andre - Thirteenth Copper Cardinal

Original 1974
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Lot number: 21
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Carl Andre (B. 1935) Thirteenth Copper Cardinal copper, in thirteen parts each: 1/4 x 19 5/8 x 19 5/8in. (0.5 x 50 x 50cm.) overall: 1/4 x 19 5/8 x 255 7/8in. (0.5 x 50 x 650cm.) Executed in 1974 Provenance Wide White Space, Antwerp. Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1974. Pre-Lot Text Property of an Important European Collection Literature A. Westwater, Carl Andre : sculpture 1958-1974, exh. cat., Bern, Kunsthalle Bern, 1975, p. 87, no. 1974-1 (installation view illustrated, p. 86). C. Andre, R. Sartorius and P. de Jonge, Carl Andre, exh. cat., The Hague, Haags Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, 1987, no. 1, p. 78. C. Andre and E. Meyer-Hermann, Carl Andre: Sculptor 1996, Krefeld at home, Wolfsburf at large, exh. cat., Krefeld, Museum Haus Lange, 1996, p. 188. Post-Lot Text This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist dated 1974.
Carl Andre - I. Al Σ 1 Ii. Al Σ 3

Carl Andre - I. Al Σ 1 Ii. Al Σ 3

Original 2006
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Lot number: 293
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Carl Andre B.1935 I. AL Σ 1 II. AL Σ 3 [TWO WORKS] i. aluminum ii. aluminum, in 3 parts i. 3/8 by 4 by 4 in. 1 by 10 by 10 cm. ii. Each: 3/8 by 4 by 4 in. 1 by 10 by 10 cm. Overall: 3/8 by 11 3/4 by 11 3/4 in. 1 by 30 by 30 cm. Executed in 2006, each work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Galeria Alfonso Artiaco, Naples Schönewald Fine Arts, Dusseldorf (acquired from the above in 2007) Private Collection, Germany Exhibited Naples, Palazzo delle Arti Napoli, Museum, Dedica–1986-2006 Twenty Years from Galleria Alfonso Artiaco, December 2006 - March 2007
Carl Andre -  Untitled

Carl Andre - Untitled

Original 1960-69
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Lot number: 96
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CARL ANDRE Two prints. Untitled (Equivalents), lithograph, 1960-69. 555x397 mm; 21 3/4x15 5/8 inches (sheet), full margins. Signed and numbered 38/50 in pen and black ink, lower margin * Untitled (Announcement Poster for "Periodic Table"), screenprint. 1967. 455x455 mm; 17 7/8x17 7/8 inches (sheet), full margins. Signed and numbered "14" in pen and black ink, lower right. Published for the same-titled exhibition at the Dwan Gallery, New York. Very good impressions.
Carl Andre - 81 Ace Zinc Square

Carl Andre - 81 Ace Zinc Square

Original 2007
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Lot number: 49
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Carl Andre B. 1935 81 ACE ZINC SQUARE zinc, in eighty-one parts each: 16 x 16 x 1/4 in. 40.6 x 40.6 x .6 cm. overall: 144 x 144 x 1/4 in. 365.7 x 365.7 x .6 cm. Executed in 2007, this work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist and dated 2011. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Ace Gallery, Los Angeles Acquired by the present owner from the above in 2011 Exhibited Beverly Hills, Ace Gallery, zinc, October - February 2007 Catalogue Note As part of one of the artist’’s most iconic bodies of work, Carl Andre’’s exquisitely gleaming 81 Ace Zinc Square is a fundamentally discrete yet enduringly monumental metallic force. As an experiential sculpture this significant work summons the beholder to an arena that is both ancient and modern; Andre conjures the natural laws of geometry and numbers, materialized through the raw metals of the earth to create a masterpiece of Minimalism. Across a delicate yet persistently ordered linear format of a perfected square grid the artist perfectly articulates the principles of reduction, simplicity, repetition and clarity that underpin the revolutionary artistic movement of which he remains a firm pioneer. With its elegant utilization of raw, polished factory materials, the present work exemplifies the revolutionary achievements Andre has made in redefining the medium of sculpture. It was in the late 1960s that Andre produced his first metal grid works; a simplistic gesture which reconfigured our conceptions of sculpture in their radical placement across the gallery floor and in the invitation for viewers to walk over them. Manifesting themselves in lived space, they have a unique participatory dimension that has altered our perceptions of the function of sculpture within the art historical canon. In his choice of materials Andre refers to the periodic table, the fundamental metals and elements that make up all matter, elements which give life. Realized in 81 equal parts, arranged as 9 rows of 9 squares, 81 Ace Zinc Square continues this profound sculptural legacy, adhering to the strict laws of square numbers and expressing the proportional laws of mathematics that guide our comprehension of nature. Andre’’s rigidly organized floor-bound grids are aligned within a strain of historically important artists working with the principles of geometric abstraction, important figures such as Piet Mondrian and Kazimir Malevich. Whilst Andre came to be influenced by Minimalist sculptors, such as Donald Judd and Robert Morris, having started his career making sculpture in the studio of Frank Stella, the influence of the painter’’s line and concentric grid work is not to be overlooked. Andre described Stella's approach to painting: "He treated a painting as a work to be accomplished by a consistent rigorous application entirely across a surface of the canvas ... breaking down a form into elements and then combining them." (Exh. Cat. London, Whitechapel Art Gallery, Carl Andre, 1978, n.p.) This basic idea is a tenet of Andre's Minimal sculpture, most perfectly expounded across the brilliant surfaces of his flat, floor-based tile pieces such as 81 Ace Zinc Square. These materials and methods of construction can also be associated with the artist’’s years spent working on the Pennsylvania Railroad in the early 1960s, where identical units could conceivably be deconstructed and reassembled in different formats. This interest in the properties of industrial elements can also be linked to his wider political outlook and commitment to Marxism, which led him to participate in artists’’ strikes and other industrial actions in the late 1960s. Andre eschews decoration and craftsmanship, choosing to simply arrange the metal plates systematically with the repetitive labor of a factory worker on a production line. When interviewed in 1970 he claimed: “The forms of my work have never particularly interested me. What has been my search really is for a material, a particle of a material. It’’s finding a material or a unit of material like a brick of the right size and the right shade and density and so forth – from finding this particle, I would combine it with others to make a work." (the artist cited in James Meyer, ed., Cuts: Texts 1959–2004, Massachusetts, 2005, p.99). Andre’’s approach to sculpture is inherently additive in nature and is based upon multiplication. As evidenced perfectly in 81 Ace Zinc Sqaure, the artist considers sculpture as a revelation that is not enacted through cuts into a block of material or bound by agents such as nails or welds, but rather built up and assembled with units, beautifully standardized in form and measurement. In this he gracefully elevates industrial systems to new levels of refined beauty; a quiet revolution that has changed the course of art history. See More See Less
Carl Andre - 15 Ace Zinc Corner

Carl Andre - 15 Ace Zinc Corner

Original 2007
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Lot number: 34
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CARL ANDRE (B. 1935) 15 Ace Zinc Corner , 2007 zinc, in fifteen parts each: 16 x 16 x 1/4in. (40.6 x 40.6 x 0.6cm) overall: 80 x 80 x 1/4in. (203.2 x 203.2 x 0.6cm) Footnotes Provenance Ace Gallery, Los Angeles. Acquired from the above by the present owner. Exhibited Los Angeles, Ace Gallery, Zinc , 20 October 2007-21 February 2008. This work is registered in the archives of The Carl Andre and Melissa L. Kretschmer Foundation and is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist. "Carl was an enormous influence on me... he changed the history of sculpture." 1 – Richard Serra Arguably the most radical of the Minimalist artists, Carl Andre has made an invaluable contribution within the tradition of sculpture. The first post-studio artist, Andre works with industrial materials sourced from factories and assembled on-site. His innovation stems from his lack of transformation; the uniform elements of his simple, linear sculptures are not even welded together. By re-orienting his works as horizontally planar, inviting audiences to walk upon them, Andre's works continue to be unsurpassed in their iconoclastic extremism. A creature of habit and repetition, Andre has costumed himself in the same German-made bib overalls for decades, keeping his hair long and stringy. In Calvin Tomkins' profile of Andre, he concedes that this choice is often misunderstood, "when the artist started wearing overalls in the late sixties, people took it as a political statement-a declaration of working-class solidarity by a man who espoused Marxist doctrines and took a leading role in the anti-establishment Art Workers Coalition. Not true, (Andre) told (Tomkins)...'it was because of my belly. All my life, my weight has fluctuated enormously, and these were the only clothes that fit me.'" 2 The son of a marine draftsman, Andre grew up in working-class Quincy, Massachusetts. The rundown industrial city has been a major informer of his work. He keeps what he calls his "Quincy Book", with black and white images of sites in Quincy, including shipyards, granite quarries, vacant lots, estuaries, brick houses, and cemeteries. His wife, the artist Melissa Kretschemer, explained that "if anyone wants to know about (Carl) they should start with 'The Quincy Book'". 3 An exemplary student, Andre was given a scholarship to Philips Andover Academy, where he began his journey towards becoming an artist through studying the extensive collection at the Addison Gallery. The painter Frank Stella was also a student at Andover, and though the two never met as schoolmates, they both spent long stretches of time opposite one another in the basement-level art studios. Stella and Andre connected in New York and became important influences on each other's practices. In what is now a legendary miscommunication, early on in their careers, Andre was carving a vertical wood sculpture in the manner of Brancusi, with negative space suggesting the rungs of a ladder. When Stella saw the uncarved back of the sculpture, he remarked that it was a good sculpture too. He had meant to urge Andre to continue to carve the back, but Andre understood his statement differently; perhaps the untouched flat side of the timber was better than what he had carved. He decided that Stella was right. He had been considering using plain units of material, and this conversation solidified his choice to proceed as such. While his friendships and subsequent intellectual connections with Frank Stella, Barbara Rose, Angela Westwater, and Richard Serra provided crucial artistic navigation, Andre credits a position working on the Pennsylvania railroad as his most informative experience towards becoming a sculptor. As a brakeman, he was forced to understand the working parts of the train's machinery. The railroad, made up of identical, repetitive elements, became a metaphor for Andre's oeuvre and began his almost erotic relationship with industrial materials. Over the course of his career, he has used steel, copper, zinc, marble, aluminum, limestone, gold, and sheet brass, explaining that "my particles are all more or less standards of the economy, because I believe in using materials of society in the form the society does not use them." 4 Andre, unlike Sol LeWitt, Brice Marden, or Richard Mangold, has never resisted the title of Minimalist. For him, there is a freedom in the tenants of Minimalism: a repetition of form marked by conceptual rigor and a purity of form devoid of human expression. Regarded as a reaction against the almost suffocating prominence of Abstract Expressionism in the 1950s, Minimalists identified with the avant-garde of the early 20th century. Suprematism, like Mimimalism, worked towards creating a universal aesthetic with the potential to be understood by the entirety of humanity without elucidation on the artist's state of mind. Within a context of mathematical structures, geometric forms, and seriality, Andre celebrates nontraditional materials, entirely removing the hand of the artist. Andre spoke to his admiration for his Minimalist title and its meaning, "what the idea of 'Minimal Art' means to me is that the person has drained and rid himself of the burden, the cultural over-burden that stands shadowing and eclipsing art. I think art is quite apart from that and you have to really rid yourself of those securities and certainties and assumptions and get down to something, which is closer and resembles some kind of blankness. Then one must construct again out of this reduced circumstance." 5 For Andre, art is ultimately about seizing and holding space in an attempt to move towards blankness, achieved through possibly infinite repetition. Like Donald Judd and Dan Flavin, his pieces physically command space both vertically and horizontally. However, Andre's palette remains earthen and one dimensional: the periodic table serves as his color spectrum. The muted, elemental quality of 15 Ace Zinc Corner (2007) echoes the sharp lines and right angles of Romanesque architecture while highlighting the subtle shimmering quality of the zinc. Utilized prehistorically, medieval alchemists burned zinc to derive zinc oxide, forming what they called "philosopher's wool" or "white snow". Andre presents a material with immense chemical prowess, but presents it simply and in repetition. By disassociating zinc's rudimentary alchemic qualities from the linearity of the assembly itself, Andre achieves his "ambition as an artist... to be the 'Turner' of matter as Turner severed color from depiction, I attempt to sever matter from depiction." 6 Though he is at his core a dissident revolutionary, Andre ironically continually attempts to equivocate the clout of the Greek caryatids and the monumental Stonehenge he was so moved by in his early twenties. For his review in The New York Times of Andre's retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1970, the critic Peter Schjeldahl commented that Andre's work stood "with an aggressive air of completeness and finality, as if each were the only, or anyway the last, work of art in the world." 7 Schjeldahl's lofty statement carries the same weight as it did in the 1970s in relation to Andre's more recent work, 15 Ace Zinc Corner included. As the artist enters the final phase of his career, Andre's mystical simplicity is as alluring and mysteriously redolent as ever. 1. C. Tomkins, "The Materialist," in The New Yorker , 5 December 2011, p. 64. 2. Ibid , p. 67. 3. Ibid , p. 65. 4. P. Tuchman and E. Meyer Hermannd (eds.), Carl Andre Sculptor , Stuttgart, 1996, p. 47. 5. D. Bourdon, "A Redefinition of Sculpture," in Carl Andre: Sculpture 1959-1977 , New York, 1978, p. 14. 6. P. Tuchman, p. 47. 7. P. Schjeldahl, "High Priest of Minimal," in The New York Times , 18 October 1970, p. 23.
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