Kusuma Affandi

Indonesia (19071990 ) - Artworks
AFFANDI Kusuma Eating Crabs

Christie's /Nov 22, 2014
191,389.36 - 287,084.04
233,508.00

Find artworks, auction results, sale prices and pictures of Kusuma Affandi at auctions worldwide.
Go to the complete price list of works Follow the artist with our email alert

 

Variants on Artist's name :

Affandi

 

Along with Kusuma Affandi, our clients also searched for the following authors:
Sindutomo Sudjojono, Sudarsono Trubus, Saiman Dullah, Roland Strasser, Fernando Cueto Amorsolo, Carlos Francisco, Jerry Elizalde Navarro
Artworks in Arcadja
464

Some works of Kusuma Affandi

Extracted between 464 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Kusuma Affandi - Self-portrait

Kusuma Affandi - Self-portrait

Original 1952
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 340
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Affandi 1907 - 1990 SELF-PORTRAIT Signed and dated 1952 Oil on canvas 107 by 95.5 cm.; 42 by 37 1/2 in. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Property from the collection of the late Professor Arthur Lim Exhibited Singapore, NUS Museums, National University of Singapore, The Arthur Lim Benefaction: Twelve Important Paintings, 2003 Literature Singapore, NUS Museums, National University of Singapore, The Arthur Lim Benefaction: Twelve Important Paintings, 2003, pg. 12, colorplate The painting is brighter than it appears in the catalog illustration. The canvas has been relined. Upon close inspection, there is very light cracking to areas of thicker impasto, consistent with age. There are two very small areas of paint loss and abrasion at upper right quadrant. Examination under ultraviolet light reveals areas of restoration at the edges of the painting, the background at upper right and upper left quadrant and at black pigments throughout the surface of the canvas, including the hair, torso and signature. Framed. "In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."
Kusuma Affandi - Minum Tuak (drinking Tuak)

Kusuma Affandi - Minum Tuak (drinking Tuak)

Original 1957
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 1033
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Affandi 1907 - 1990 MINUM TUAK (DRINKING TUAK) Signed and dated 57 Oil on canvas 120 by 136 cm.; 47 1/4 by 53 1/2 in. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Private Asian Collection Distinguished for his unique painting style and idiosyncratic subject matter, Affandi was considered the consummate expressionist painter in Asia during the mid-20 th century. He was born in 1907 and grew up surrounded by nationalist leaders and literati, eventually becoming an active player in the struggle for Indonesian independence. Entrenched in the revolutionary aesthetic movements that occurred on a global scale during the World-War and Post-World-War period, Affandi became the founder of the Lembaga Pelukis Rakyat (The People’’s Painters’’ Association), which invigorated Indonesian artists to focus on populist themes, commoners, and the indigenous human experience in its most candid form. Affandi was aware of the pre-existing art historical representations in Indonesia; the Mooi Indie genre which captured romantic depictions of the archipelago during the colonial period, the Pita-Maha style, an amalgamation of the local wayang forms with stylized techniques by foreign primitivist painters, and the Persagi (Association of Indonesian Draughtsmen) movement that encouraged an art form that articulated the artist’’s visions while simultaneously conveying the thoughts of the nation and culture at large. In grave disaccords with these exotic and orientalist portrayals of his nation, Affandi elucidated the genuine nature of his country through his art, emphasizing a pan-Indonesian existence that would ultimately instigate and propel the evolution of a truly Indonesian modernism. The present lot was painted in 1957, immediately when Affandi returned to Bali years after having visited for the first time in 1939. He voyaged there strictly for a purpose: to capture events that rightly reflected the Balinese life such as cockfights, traditional dances and particular scenes that touched him. He admitted that “I too like beautiful things, but they do not necessary provide inspiration for my work. My subjects are expressive rather than beautiful. I paint suffering – an old woman, a beggar, a black mountain... My great wish is that people learn a little from my work. “ In keeping with his longing to describe the honest Indonesian experience, Affandi chose to render a group of Balinese men as they nongkrong, or gather with friends, while drinking tuak manis, sweet rice-wine. Sitting cross-legged on the floor in the foreground of the painting, the ungainly kinsmen imbibe gulps of this local concoction of palm, yeast and sugar in the night alfresco. The manner in which they urgently guzzle down their liquor is strikingly similar to that depicted in The Drinkers, which was painted by Dutch Post-Impressionist Vincent Van Gogh after a woodblock print by Honoré Daumier. Emotionally affected by the circadian activities of the humble, these three artists’’ expressions resonated with the subject of alcohol as a form of escapism. Though the men portrayed are clearly in the company of their friends, they do not engage one another. Instead, they avidly concentrate on swallowing their alcohol with such indulgence and haste as to satisfy a thirst that transcends the mere physical. This reveals the bleak despondency of inebriation, serving as a social commentary imbued with a deep sense of pathos. Behind these animated men in Minum Tuak are roosters, their heads protruding through the large, cylindrical cages in which they are confined, signifying the anticipation of a Balinese cockfight. The cockfight, or tajen, is an ancient ritual in Balinese Hinduism practiced by men in order to banish evil spirits. A crouching man wearing a conical, Indonesian hat known as the caping proudly lifts his gamecock as he approaches the cockpit. A yellow outline on the right side of the backdrop delineates a prowling dog with his tail upright and ears erect, insinuating a sense of anxiousness and excitement in the work. While the kinsmen seem content in the familiarity of their peers and the routine of this age-old sport, the scene is made tense by the urgency and forceful strokes so prevalent in Affandi’’s expressionistic painting style. Enraptured by the process of painting his work, Affandi squeezed paint directly from the tube and applied it onto the raw canvas, forcefully spreading the wet pigments across the surface with his bare hands, wrists, fingers and palms. It is evident when beholding this dynamic work that the riveted artist painted with the spontaneity and zeal akin to that of Action Painting, suggesting that the physical act of painting itself was an essential aspect of the finished product. This inimitable technique afforded Affandi with the aesthetic liberty otherwise stymied by the paintbrush, ultimately eradicating the physical distance between artist and creation. According to the critic Herbert Read, Affandi had succeeded in ‘developing a new course of Expressionism.” As manifest in Minum Tuak, Affandi’’s quintessential modus provided his works with a thick, palpable impasto and three-dimensional quality, which affected his overall use of color, shape and line. Comparable to the sinuous lines Van Gogh utilized to represent the clouds, clothes and grass, the swirling outlines in the Affandi’’s work infuses a distinct rhythm, vitality and soul to the scene, allowing the artist to express his feelings in a tactile manner. In this manner, Affandi could pervade his work with a certain crudeness and roughness to amplify his disapproving thoughts about these drinkers. Much like French artist Paul Gauguin who experimented with the exaggeration of features and curvilinear forms in order to stylize his figures, as seen in his painting Vision after the Sermon, Affandi could distort his figures by dileneating their forms so that they appear hyperbolically grotesque. The paint, uncontrollably squeezed from its tubes, organically gnarled the outlines of Affandi’’s figures. Employing the paint straight from their containers, Affandi did not mix his pigments to find certain hues that would mimic natural tones of reality. Instead, he was dependent on the colors that were manufactured. As a self-taught artist, Affandi mastered academic painting with verisimilitude after having garnered the fundamentals of anatomy and perspective from merely observing an Italian artist in Bandung. By merging these scrupulous rules with the passionate strokes that expressed his simmering emotions, Affandi created his own form of naturalism: a type hauled from the reality he viewed and filtered through sentiments he sensed. Similar to Norwegian symbolist and expressionist artist Edvard Munch who adopted penetrating and overstated colors to express the psyche of the characters in his works, Affandi used concentrated colors that would sincerely enliven the figures in his emotionally charged painting. In his work Jealousy, Munch uses color to convey a poignant turmoil between three characters: a man with an acidic green face representing his bitter envy as he covets the red-skinned woman, the object of his lust. A second man with a sickly, yellow countenance stands in between the two, his existence isolating them from one another and drawing a vicious love triangle. The obscured backdrop in Jealousy amplifies the bright colors of the alienated figures and suggests a bleak energy, akin to the dark setting of Affandi’’s Minum Tuak. Affandi paints the people an intense red with a defined layer of black and yellow. Deep red passion, sunny yellow elation and powerful black uncouthness fuse together to emphasize the myriad emotions that transfuse these parched men, who quench themselves irrepressibly as they eagerly await the cockfight. Affandi often depicted men drinking rice wine and engaging in cockfighting, recurring subjects in his vast opus. Upon viewing this masterpiece, it is clear that Affandi did not philosophize his paintings; he merely depicted what he witnessed in a matter-of-fact manner. As a curious artist who integrated into the Balinese culture, he explored his subjects on a personal level in order to truthfully comprehend them before immortalizing them. In an effort to shatter the rose-tinted glasses through which depictions of Indonesia were filtered, Affandi inadvertently created an oeuvre that now serves as an important testament to Indonesian disposition during its infant stages of modern history. Distinguished for his unique painting style and idiosyncratic subject matter, Affandi was considered the consummate expressionist painter in Asia during the mid-20
Kusuma Affandi - Seascape And Wrestling

Kusuma Affandi - Seascape And Wrestling

Original 1945
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 328
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
AFFANDI (1907-1990) SEASCAPE AND WRESTLING signed with artist's monogram; dated and inscribed '45 Kali Kering' (lower right); signed with artist's monogram and dated '45' (lower right) two ink on paper 21.5 x 30 cm. (9 5/8 x 11 3/4 in.);& 23 x 30.5 cm. (9 x 11 3/4 in.) Executed in 1945; & Executed in 1945 2 (2)
Kusuma Affandi - Eating Crabs

Kusuma Affandi - Eating Crabs

Original 1960
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 14
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Lot Description AFFANDI (1907-1990) EATING CRABS signed with artist's monogram and dated '1960' (lower left) oil on canvas 123.5 x 98 cm. (48 3/5 x 38 5/8 in.) Painted in 1960 AFFANDI (1907-1990) EATING CRABS signed with artist's monogram and dated '1960' (lower left) oil on canvas 123.5 x 98 cm. (48 3/5 x 38 5/8 in.) Painted in 1960 Provenance Private Collection, Indonesia View Lot Notes > AFFANDI (1907-1990) EATING CRABS signed with artist's monogram and dated '1960' (lower left) oil on canvas 123.5 x 98 cm. (48 3/5 x 38 5/8 in.) Painted in 1960 Provenance
Kusuma Affandi - Self Portrait With Eclipse

Kusuma Affandi - Self Portrait With Eclipse

Original 1980
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Lot number: 387
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Affandi 1907 - 1990 SELF PORTRAIT WITH ECLIPSE Signed and dated 1980 Oil on canvas 98 by 127 cm.; 38 1/2 by 50 in. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice The uniqueness of Affandi lay into his ability to dig and to explore the hidden complexity between human beings and their diverse emotional moods. His compassion in revealing the core of social and natural reality allows him to stand firmly on the ripple, among other influential Indonesian artists. His brushstrokes do not only create a pulchritudinous scene on the canvas, but more importantly they record Affandi’’s emotions and attitudes towards the society. His self-portraits are particularly striking in demonstrating his artistic development; they are the keynote of his maturity; they are the soul of his wisdom. Self Portrait with Eclipse marks as a turning point among all of his self-portraits, it can be seen as the calm before the storm, and more importantly, which is a self-portrait that Affandi has used in bridging a connotation with his later works. Different to his early self-portraits, this painting does not concentrate on the exploration of social reality that is built in racialized forms, but it uniquely intensifies on Affandi’’s appreciation towards his family and his life. Affandi’’s fondness in recording the relationship between human and nature has again appeared and this is presented through placing the sun as a subject. The sun is a visual metaphor that mirrors Affandi’’s attitude and affection towards his life and fate, therefore the boldness of the eclipse has unquestionably heightened the rarity and the stature of this painting. The present painting is similar to Affandi’’s later work – Unsuccessful (1987). Both paintings exploit the preciousness of the eclipse and from which present the artist’’s acceptance towards his fate. However, Affandi seems to carry a more cheerful attitude in Self Portrait with Eclipse. The use of harmonious colours together with the movement of velvet brushstrokes has allowed us to understand Affandi’’s expressive soul and energetic torso in 1980. In contrast, Affandi’’s figure is nearly transparent in Unsuccessful. Through merging himself with the eclipse has intensified his grief, thus highlights the metaphorical difference between Unsuccessful and Self Portrait with Eclipse. The positive energy that the present painting brings is diffused through his calm facial features and across his cheerful bite of the pipe, the collision of the colours, figure and metaphor has therefore created the scene in a highly delightful light. This painting also makes a forceful connotation with his later painting Solar Eclipse (1983). The significance of the eclipse is again presented under the use of melancholic paint; the vigorous and dramatic brushstrokes magnify Affandi’’s sorrow in Solar Eclipse. Through comparing Solar Eclipse with the present painting, we can understand that there is a gradual transition of emotions in his self-portraits. The change from happiness to grief has been recorded on the canvases; the change in thoughts has been recorded under his brushstrokes; the change in metaphor has finally allowed us to agree - Self-portrait with Eclipse is a turning point of Affandi’’s attitude and artistic development. The work is in good condition overall, as is the canvas, which is clear and taut. There is evidence of light wear and handling around the edges of the painting, but only visible upon close observation. Impastos are healthy and intact. Examination under ultraviolet light shows no sign of restoration. Framed "In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."
Arcadja LogoProducts
Subscriptions
Advertising
Sponsored Auctions
Subscriptions

Who we are
Our Product
Follow Arcadja on Facebook
Follow Arcadja on Twitter
Follow Arcadja on Google+
Follow Arcadja on Pinterest
Follow Arcadja on Tumblr